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lANDBOOK 

ID TltE 
.1 ir- Prf-.TURT, GAJ.UEI 



ElJROHt 



HANDBOOK 



TO THB 



PUBLIC PICTURE GALLERIES 



OP 



EUROPE. 



HANDBOOK 



TO THB 



PUBLIC PICTURE GALLERIES 



OP 



EUROPE. 



WLTB A BBIEF SKETCH OF THE HISTORY OF THE 
VABI0U8 SCHOOLS OF PAINTING, 

FROM THE 13th CENTURY TO THE 18th INCLUSIVE. 



BY 

KATE THOMPSON^ _ 

I en 

LONDON: 

MAOMILLAN AND CO. 

1877. 

JU Btghtt Reterved, 



LONDON : 

PRINTED BY WILLIAM OLOWES AND idONS, 

STAMFORD STREET AKD CHARIKG GROSS. 



PREFACE. 



-•o«- 



I WISH to say a few words as to the origin of this 
little book. During the last five years I have 
accompanied my father, Sir Henry Thompson, on 
his annual tour on the Continent, where, among 
other things, one of our main objects was to visit 
and study together the Picture Galleries in the 
great capitals of Europe. Following his advice, 
I began by making a few notes on the spot of 
each chief work, and by consulting authorities 
respecting them and the history of their painters. 
At the same time he suggested that I should 
make a chronological table of artists of all 
schools, adding a few chief biographical incidents 
relating to each, as a pursuit for my own in- 
formation and profit. It was not until this little 
exercise was nearly complete that it happened to 
be named in the hearing of my friend Mr. George 
Grove, who was pleased to think that I had 
collected materials for a small manual which 
might be of some service, at all events to the 
untravelled tourist. Accordingly the whole 
manuscript was carefully revised and somewhat 
enlarged, with a view to meet this purpose. In 



vi PBEFACE, 



working for this object I must be permitted to 
add that I have been greatly indebted to my 
father for hints and guidance both as to the 
arrangement and the matter of my work. 

What I have tried to accomplish is then as 
follows : 

1. An examination of every one of the chief 
Public Picture Galleries of Europe, and most of 
the smaller ones, so as to be able to point out 
the principal and most interesting pictures in 
each ; invariably adding their numbers and titles 
from the local catalogues, in order to facilitate 
reference on the part of the traveller. I have 
placed at the end of the work a list for each 
gallery, or short catalogue, of these pictures. 
These will be found under the painters' names, 
which are arranged for convenience in alpha- 
betical order. 

2. I have endeavoured to give a brief historical 
sketch of each of the European Schools of Art 
from its earliest known origin to the end of the 
last century. This necessarily comprises a few 
biographical records of each principal master, and 
I have examined and collated the best known as 
well as the most recent works for the facts and 
dates given. Then, in order to illustrate the 
work of each school or master, I have throughout 
invariably referred in the text to several pictures 
as typical examples, stating the number of each 
in the gallery to which it belongs. While the 
great majority of these examples is of course to 



PBEFAOE. vn 



be found in galleries and mtLsetuns^ not a few 
churches, especially in Italy, are also referred to. 
My object has not been to make a long list of 
painters, which would have been a very easy task, 
but, on the contrary, to limit as far as possible this 
elementary study to the consideration of those 
masters who were really famous or necessary to 
be mentioned in tracing the outlines of the 
history. 

3. I have compiled with great care Chrono- 
logical Tables containing the dates of birth and 
death, so far as they are known, of every painter of 
celebrity — that is, historically recognised as such 
— during the period already stated. At the same 
time I have endeavoured to ascertain the correct 
spelling of names, by no means an easy task, for 
the instances are not few in which two or more 
modes of spelling are supported on good authority. 

4. Further, I ought to say that I have not 
mentioned any picture which has not been seen 
and noted by myself : many have been examiued 
more than once or even twice. But I have not 
felt myself qualified to enter into the region of 
Art criticism, and have not aspired to do so. Still 
it has not been found possible to see and compare 
so many fine works without occasionally express- 
ing some sort of opinion here and there. 

The most difiBcult problem perhaps which pre- 
sents itself to the travelling Fine Artstudentis that 
of determining the authorship of certain pictures. 
Each gallery decides for itself— and naturally 



viii PREFACE, 



shows some partiality in doing so — the authenticity 
of the works in its own possession. In some few 
instances^ in which the assumption of a great 
name was obviously unjustifiable, I have at once 
said the work ascribed to such a master is 
certainly not by his hand; but in a certain 
proportion of doubtful examples — and they are 
numerous — I have felt it was not in my province 
to contest the name employed. On the other 
hand, in many cases throughout the catalogues 
I have intentionally denoted the existence of 
ffrave doubt by placing: the words " attributed to " 
STer the painter's naif e. 

5. Lastly, great pains have been taken to 
insure accuracy in reference to the catalogue 
numbers attached to pictures ; but in one or two 
places the catalogue is out of print — in another 
it is in course of construction, and the contents 
of the gallery are in confusion. I am conscious 
that, notwithstanding all my care, some few 
clerical errors may have crept in. I shall be 
very grateful for corrections of these, find indeed 
for any suggestions towards improving my little 
work, which occur to any one who may chance 
to use it. 

Kate Thompson. 

S5 Wimpole Street, London* 
July 1877. 



CONTENTS. 



•■01 

PAOB 



List op Museums, Galleries, and otheb places 
catalogued 



\ 



List of Authorities consulted xiii 

The Bise and Progress op Painting in — 

Italy 1 

]b*landers 101 

Holland 132 

Germany 174 

Spain 193 

France ... ... 215 

England 233 

Introductory Notes to the Catalogues . 255 

Catalogues of the Galleries in — 

Italy 257 

Belgium 302 

Holland 309 

Germany 324 

Spain 380 

France 390 

England ........ 413 

Russia 433 



Index 451 



( xi ) 



LIST OF MUSEUMS, GALLERIES, AND OTHER 

PLACES CATALOGUED. 





ITALY. 


BOME 


. . Gallery of the Capitol. 




>» 


. . CoUmna Palcuse. 


Bekgamo 


. Accademia Carrara. 


»» 


. . Corsini Palace. 


Bologna 


. Pinacoteea. 


» 


. . Boria Palace. 


Brescia . 


. Mnaeo Cimco. 


>» 


. . Fameae Palace. 


Febbaba. 


. Ateneo, 


» 


. . Villa Famesina. 


Flobbnce 


. Jecodemia (ieRe heUe 


w 


. ViUa Ludovisi. 




Arti. 


»» 


. . Boyal Palace of the 


»» 


. Fitti Palace. 




Qnirinal. 


» 


, Royal Gallery of the 


>» 


, . Boapigliosi PotUuse. 




Uffizi. 


» 


. . Seiarra Palace. 


Genoa 


(Palazzo Brigndi. — 
* \ And others. 


rt 


, . Spada Palace, 


X^ MIA^^ V/AA • 


» 


, . Vatican Collection. 


Mantua . 


. Palazzo del Ti. 


RjBNA 


, . GaUeria deUe beOe 


n • 


. DuccU Palace. 




Arti. 


11 • 


. CasteUo di Corti. 


» 


, Pahizzo PtMUeo. 


Milan . 


. Ambrosiana. 


Turin 


. . Pinacoteea. 


11 • 


. Brera. 


Ubbino , 


, Museum. 


MODENA . 


• OaUeria Estenae. 


VSNIGE . 


, . Aceademia deUe belle 


Naples . 


. Boyal Mttseum, 




AHi. 


Padua . 


. Mtiseo Civico. 


99 • 


, . Bucal Palace. 


Parma . 


. Pinacoteea. 


»» « 


. Scuola di San Bocoo, 


PEBUaiA . 


. PiTiaooieea. . 


Yebona . 


. Pinaeoteca. 


w 


. Sala de2 C^mMo. 


VlCENZA . 


, . Museum. 


PlSA . . 


. Aceademia. 






w 
BoME 


. Campo Santo. 

. Aeoademia di San 




NsuaoK. 




JLuoa. 


ANTlNrEBP 


. Museum* 


»> • 


. ViUaAlbani. 


Bruges . 


. Academy of Pictures. 


» • 


. Barherini Pcdace. 


»» 


. Hospital of St. John, 


t* • 


, Borgheae Pdlaoe, 


Brussels 


. Musee National, 



zii 



GALLERIES CATALOGUED. 



AlfflTEBDAM 



»» 



»» 



w 



Haablbm 

»» 

Hague . 

w • 

»» • 

Leiden . 
bottebdam 



ArGeBUBG 
Berlin . 

Gassel 
Cologne . 

Dabmbtadt 
Dbbsden. 

Frankfort 

MmncH . 

NtJRNBERO 

Stuttgart 



HOLLAND. 

Museum of the Trip- 

penhuis. 
Van der Hoop 

Museum. 
Six van HiUegrvm 

Collection. 
Van Loon Collection. 
Toumhall. 
TownkaJEL 

Hoffe van Berestyn. 
Royal Museum. 
Toionhall. 
Steengracht Codec- 

tion. 
Stedelyk Museum. 
Museum. 

aEBXAKY. 

. Gallery of Pictures, 

. Royal Picture Gal- 
lery. 

. GuUery of Pictwres. 

. Museum Wallraf- 
Richartz. 

. Gallery of Pictures. 

. Royal Gallery of 
Pictu/res. 

. Stddel Picture Gal- 
lery. 

. Royal Pinacothek. 

. Moritz-kapeUe. 

. Royal Gallery of 
Pictures. 



ViKNNA . 



Madrid . 



»» 



Seville . 
Valencia 



Bordeaux 
Caen . . 

Lille 
Lyons 
Marseilles 



AUSTRIA. 

. Tlie Royal Belvedere. 

. GaUery of Prince 

LiecMenstein. 



8FAIK. 

. Academia de San 

Fernando. 
. Royal Museum. 
. Museum. 
. Museum. 



FEAVCE. 

. Museum. 

. Museum in the Hotel 

de Ville. 
. Museum. 
. Museum. 
. Gallery of Pictures. 



MONTPELLIER Mus^c Fohre. 
Paris. . . Louvre. 



DULWIOH. 

Hampton 

Court . 

London . 



EKOLAND. 

Gallery of Pictures. 
Collection in the 
Palace. 
. National Gallery. 



} 



BUSSIA. 

St. Peters- \ Gallery of the Her- 
mitage. 



BUBG 



"■} 



( xHi ) 



LIST OF AUTHOEITIES CONSULTED. 



LiYES OF THE Paintebs. Bj Yasaii. Translated by Mrs. Jonathan 
Foster. Bohn's edition. 1850. 

Annals of the Abtists of Spain. By Sir W. Stirling Maxwell, 
Bart. 1848. 

The Schools of Painting in Italy. By Kngler. Translated by a 
Lady. Edited, with Notes, by Sir Charles L. EasUake, P.B.A., 
F.R.S. 1851. 

Raphael d'Urbin et son P^e, G. Santi. Par O. D. Passavant. 1860. 

The Epochs of Painting : a Biographical and Gbitical Essay on 
Painting and Paintebs of all times and many places. By 
Ralph Nicholas Womnm, Keeper and Secretary to the National 
GaUery. 1864. 

Some Account of the Life and Works of Hans Holbein. By 
R. N. Wommn. 1867. 

A Century of Painters of the English School. By Richard 
Redgrave, R.A., and Samnel Redgrave. 1866. 

History OF Art. ByDr.WilhelmLiibke. Translated by F.E. Burnett. 
1868. 

Handbook for Travellers in Spain. By Richard Ford, F.S.A. 
Fourth Edition. 1869. 

The Cicerone ; or, Akt Guide to Painting in Italy, for the use 
OF Travellers. By Dr. Jacob Burckhardt. Translated from 
the German by Mrs. A. H. Clough. Edited by Dr. von Zahn. 
1873. 

Antonio Allegri da Correggio. From the German of Dr. Jnlins 
Meyer. Edited, with an Introduction, by Mrs. Charles Heaton. 
1876. 



xiT AUTH0BITIE8 CONSULTED. 

A Brief Histobt of thb Paintebs of all Schools. By Louis 
Yiardot and other writers. 1877. 

A New Histoby of PAnarma in Italy fbom the Second to the 
Sixteenth Gentvby. By J. A. Crowe and G. B. Gavalcaselle.'^ 
1864. 

A Histoby of Painting in Nobth Italy from the Fourteenth to 
the Sixteenth Century. By J. A. Crowe and G. B. Caval- 
caselle. 1871. 

The Early Flemish Painters : Notices of their Lives and Works. 
By J. A. Crowe and G. B. Cavalcaselle. Second Edition, 1872. 

Titian: his Life and Times, with some Account of his Family, 
chiefly from new and unpublished Becobds. By J. A. Crowe 
and G. B. Cavalcaselle. 1877. 

* When the ftafhority of Meesn. Crowe and Cavalcaselle is expressly cited in the 
text* the initials C. and C. will indicate the fact. 



HANDBOOK 



TO THK 



PUBLIC PICTURE GALLERIES 



or 



EUROPE. 



HANDBOOK 



TO THE 



^nWk ipkturt iaites d ^mop. 



OUTLINES OF A HISTORY OF THE RISE AND PROGRESS 

OF PAINTING IN ITALY. 

In presenting a brief sketch of the history ot^, Intro- 
Art and of the chronology of artists of past time, i ^^*^'y- 
it seems necessary at the outset to observe that, | 
although it has been the custom to classify them \ 
according to the century in which they live, this 
mode of treatment is a somewhat arbitrary one. ■ 
For example, an artist born in the latter third of ■ 
one century may more properly belong to the next, ■ 
as majiifestly his influence is not felt until the 
latter period. It may therefore often be found 
advisable to regard an artist not as belonging to 
the century of his birth, but to that in which his 
works were first seen and known. Again, the 
works of some artists belong equally to two 
centuries, the latter part of one and the begin- 
ning of the following. Lastly, it may be desirable 
to remind some readers that the Italian mode of 

tt B 



2 



THE RISE AND PROGRESS 



Tuscan 

SchoolylZth 

century. 



Schools of 
Siena and 
Pisa, IZth 
century. 



School of 
Florence, 
ISth cen- 
tury, 

Oimabue. 



reckoning the century difiFers from our own. 
Thus the present century is for us the '* nine- 
teenth," the Italian names it the " eighteenth ;" so 
that the " Quattrocentisti " of the Italian writers 
are the masters not of the " fourteenth," but of 
our " fifteenth " century ; and the " Cinquecento " 
indicates the style of the " sixteenth " century in 
our language. 

Commencing then to reckon the century ac- 
cording to the English usage, we begin by tracing 
the rise of native Italian art in North Italy 
in the thirteenth century. Before this period 
the type, met with chiefly in the form of mosaics, 
had been largely influenced by Byzantine tra- 
ditions. It has been usual to employ the term 
Tuscan as denoting the school which embraced 
all the great painters of this century belonging 
to Northern Italy. Under this designation it is 
intended to include the painters of Siena, Pisa, 
and Florence. 

The chief of these early masters are Guido da 
Siena and Giunta Pisano. By the formre there 
is a signed picture dated 1221, painted originally 
for S. Domenico at Siena, where it still remains : 
the latter is represented by frescoes in the Upper 
Church of S. Francesco at Assisi, and one or two 
are doubtfully attribufed to him at Pisa. 

Later still, namely in 1240, was bom the 
famous Cimabue, several of whose works are still 
extant ; some of the best known being the large 
Madonnas in the Accademia and in the UfSzi at 



OF PAINTING IN ITALY. 



3 



Duccio da 
Siena, 



Florence. Besides the celebrated Madonna which 
was removed from the painter's studio with great 
pomp, and is now in the Capella Kuccellai in S. 
Maria Novella there, one also is attributed to 
him in the Louvre, No. 174, which at all events 
is an example of his style. But his principal 
achievements are the frescoes in S. Francesco 
at Assisi just referred to, which occupy a large 
portion of the upper church. Some of these 
have recently been restored, and as it appeared 
to the writer (1874) in colour unnecessarily 
positive and gaudy. 

Another painter of celebrity in this century 
was Duccio, a native of Siena. According to 
existing documents, he was an established painter 
at Siena in 1282, and therefore was a contem- 
porary of Cimabue. His greatest work is an 
altar-piece, consisting of several compartments, 
now on the walls of the Duomo at Siena, and 
originally painted for the chief altar there. His 
principal followers were the two brothers Loren- 
zetti, also Sienese by birth. The * Fathers and 
Hermits in the Wilderness', which forms a fresco 
on the walls of the Campo Santo at Pisa, was 
executed by the elder brother Pietro; and 
Ambrogio, the younger, has left some impor- 
tant frescoes, representing " justice," " concord," 
and "peace," and the "effect of good and bad 
judgment," in the Sala de' Nove at the Palazzo 
Pubblico at Siena. 

Margaritone d'Arezzo must also be mentioned 

B 2 



The 
Lorenzetti. 



Margari- 
tone, 



THE RISE AND PB0OBE88 



Cavallmi, 



as one whose works are pre-eminent at this 
period. One of his best, formerly in S. Mar- 
gherita at Arezzo, is in the National Gallery, 
London, No. 564. 

Pietro Cavallini, although a Boman by birth, 

I is another whose works may yet be seen at 
Florence, Orvieto, and Assisi. Many of his 

i mosaics also are well preserved in S. Maria in 

; Trastevere at Eome. 



Ikuoan 

8chool,14th 
century. 



Oiotto. 



FOURTEENTH CENTURY. 

Two principal schools may be distinguished in 
this century, the one chiefly associated with 
Florence, the other with Siena ; both, however, 
may be regarded as merging in the Tuscan school, 
which still maintains the first place during this 
period. It is diflScult to say how far its influence 
in the thirteenth century extended to the rest of 
Italy, but early in the fourteenth Cimabue's 
great pupil Giotto gave a new impulse to art 
throughout Italy, from the Venetian to the Nea- 
politan territories. Bom in 12T6, Oiotto's work 
belongs more strictly to the fourteenth century, 
of which he is the earliest and one of the greatest 
masters. Like some others of the most distin- 
guished of the time, his power and versatility were 
remarkable. A noble monument of his skill in 
architecture remains in the well-known Campanile 
at Florence, while his ability as a sculptor is 
shown in the statues which adorn it. He also 



OF PAINTING IN ITALY. 



designed, if he did not execute, the * Navicella ' in 
mosaic for the vestibule of St. Peter's at Eoine ; 
and several crucifixes in wood were carved by 
him. But the works which gained the highest 
celebrity are the wall paintings in the Lower 
Church of S. Francesco at Assisi ; and the series 
of frescoes of the history of Christ in the Church 
of the Madonna dell' Arena at Padua. An altar- 
piece, described by Vasari, a * Saint Francis of 
Assisi,' with predella, is No. 209 at the Louvre. 
The interesting fragments in fair preservation re- 
lating to the seven sacraments still to be seen in 
the Incoronata at Naples have been until lately 
attributed to Giotto, but they are now generally 
admitted to be the work of a follower. Ranking 
with these, probably, are two small panels in the 
Royal Gallery at Berlin, Nos. 1073 and 1074, 
there attributed to Giotto ; while four others are 
ascribed to Taddeo Gaddi. The well-known small 
panels, Nos. 4 to 14, in the Accademia of Florence, 
long believed to be by Giotto, are also now re- 
garded as the work of Taddeo Gaddi from designs 
of the master. It is not to be forgotten that Dante 
was on the most intimate terms with Giotto, and 
doubtless this friendship influenced his work to 
some extent. 

So famous a master had naturally a vast 
number of imitators and followers, wlio are 
known as the Giotteschi. Among these Taddeo 
Gaddi, and later Agnolo Gaddi, his son and 
scholar, rank first. The principal frescoes of the 



School of 
Giotto. ' 



THE BI8E AND PB00BE88 



former, representing scenes from the life of the 
Virgin, are in the Baroncelli or Giugni Chapel 
in S. Croce at Florence ; those of Agnplo Gaddi, 
depicting the * Finding of the True Cross,' are 
preserved in the choir of the same church, and 
manifest a striking advance on the earliest work 
of the school, as do also his frescoes of the life 
of the Virgin in the Cathedral of Prato, Small 
examples ascribed to Taddeo Gaddi are to be 
found at Berlin ; and a predella in three parts is 
No. 199 in the Louvre. 

Another painter of this period was Tommaso di 
Stefano, commonly called Giottino, but he chiefly 
occupied himself in imitating the great master, 
and cannot be said to have accomplished much 
for the advancement of art. 

At this point we may appropriately refer to 
Giotto's gifted contemporary Simone Martini of 
Siena (bom 1283), often erroneously called Simone 
Memmi, owing to his marriage with a sister of 
Lippo Memmi. Not much inferior perhaps to 
the Florentine, Simone's influence was first and 
greatest in the Sienese school of the 14th century. 
His works in fresco, both nimierous and important, 
are principally to be found at Siena and Assisi. 
The Palazzo Pubblico of his native town contains 
a large wall painting by him of the 'Virgin and 
Child with Saints and Evangelists;' while the 
Capella di S. Martino in the Lower Church of 
S. Francesco at Assisi is entirely decorated 
with frescoes by his hand. Besides these, in the 



hhool of 

entury. 

Simone 
\fartinu 



OF FAINTING IN IT ALT. 



UflSzi at Florence is an altar-piece, Nos. 6 and 8, 
interesting as being the joint work of Simone and 
his brother-in-law Lippo Memmi, who was also a 
painter of some note. An extremely valuable 
example of Simone's work exists in the Royal 
Institution, Liverpool, No. 7. Simone of Siena 
was intimate with Petrarch, visited him at Vau- 
cluse, and painted frescoes at Avignon, mere frag- 
ments only of which are now visible. 

It would not be right to omit noticing in this 
record, however briefly, the Campo Santo at Pisa, 
which holds such an important place in the history 
of Art of the fourteenth century. Several of 
the greatest painters of the time were employed 
to decorate its walls. Foremost among these 
stands Orcagna, or Arcagnolo, who flourished 
about the middle of the fourteenth century. His 
finest known works are the frescoes depicting the 
* Triumph of Death ' and the * Last Judgment,' 
botk remarkable for originality and independent 
thought, still preserved in the Campo Santo; 
and the frescoes of the * Last Judgment ' in the 
Capella Strozzi in Santa Maria Novella at 
Florence. A large altar-piece, the * Coronation 
of the Virgin,' and nine smaller works originally 
forming part of the same work, are now in our 
National Gallery, Nos. 569 to 578 inclusive. 
Orcagna was also both a sculptor and architect, 
as witness the elaborately adorned altar by him 
in Or San Michele at Florence. Although doubt- 
less influenced by Giotto, he can hardly be classed 



Campo 

Santo, 

Pisa. 



Orcagna. 



8 



THE JRI8E AND PROGRESS 



S<-hooi of 
Bologna, 
14M cen- 
tury. 



Sc/iool of 
Modcna, 
\Ath ceil- 
tttry. 



as one of his followers. Other frescoes in the 
Campo Santo are attributed to Francesco da 
Volterra, some of which are much in the style of 
Giotto ; Pietro di Puccio is said to have painted 
others, but the whole subject of their origin is 
involved in much obscurity. 

We know a little, but not much, of the earliest 
names in the history of the Bolognese school 
during the fourteenth century. Like others, it 
received some influence from the works of Giotto ; 
and some pictures of this age are extant in the 
Bologna Gallery and elsewhere under the names 
of Vitale, Jacopo A vanzi or da Bologna, Simone 
Crocefissi, or da Bologna, Lambertini Michele or 
Matteo da Bologna, and Jacopo di Paolo. Works 
in the gallery by each of these are Nos. 10, 103, 
104, 159, 160, 161, 162, and 203, which is an 
excellent example of Vitale. All these masters 
worked more in fresco than on smaller pictures. 

In Modena also there existed painters of 
some note in the latter half of this century — 
namely, Tommaso and Barnaba da Modena. A 
few works of the latter are still to be found : as 
examples, see at the Stadel Gallery, Frankfort, 
No. I. ; and at Berlin No. 1171. 



FIFTEENTH CENTURY. 

The term Eenaissance is usually employed to 
denote that revolution in art ideas and practice 
which resulted from the new appreciation of 



OF PAINTINO IN ITALY, 



9 



ancient Greek and Roman art in every form, and 
which very gradually appeared during the four- 
teenth, fifteenth, and sixteenth centuries. 

During the fifteenth century we observe the 
establishment of this change through the works 
of many famous masters, known as the " Quattro- 
centisti ;" until it culminated in the achievements 
of Leonardo da Vinci, Michael Angelo, Eaphael, 
Titian, and their followers, in the end of this 
century and the beginning of the sixteenth. 

In the works of the pious monk Fra Angelico 
da Fiesole (1387-1455) this new influence is not 
to be seen, for he rigidly followed the ancient i i^^ry. 
traditions of the Church. He left numerous and ! ^^^ ^"^7^ 

hco da 
Fiesole. 



School of 
Florencey 
I5th cen- 



remarkable proofs of his zeal, industry, and de- 
votional spirit in the wall paintings of the Convent 
of S. Marco at Florence. All his works are more 
or less pervaded by deep religious feeling ; and 
the type of face which he delineates is always 
marked by pious fervour or ecstasy. He painted 
with extreme care, for, although he generally 
introduces a large number of small figures into 
a picture, each one is highly and delicately 
finished. The Capella Brizio in the Cathedral of 
Orvieto contains a fresco on the ceiling which 
is one of the finest of the master's productions, 
* Christ seated in Judgment, surrounded by Saints 
and Prophets.' A large painting, a * Coronation 
of the Virgin,' No. 214, is in the Louvre at Paris ; 
and a series of small panel pictures are in the 
Academy at Florence, and many others exist in 



10 



THE RISE AND PJR0GBES8 



Masolino 

and 

Masaocio. 



various European galleries. For instance, in the 
Pitti at Florence there is a fine triptych by him, 
No. 373. There are two examples in the National 
Gallery, Nos. 582 and 663. The latter is an 
admirable illustration of Angelico's style. 

Two masters who were among the first to give 
a fresh impulse to art at this time were Masolino 
and his scholar Masaccio, both Florentines. Not 
much is known of the former ; but of Masaccio it 
is certain that he gradually freed himself from 
the conventional style of his predecessors, and 
formed one of his own from an independent and 
close study of nature itself. His principal work, 
a series of frescoes, are well preserved in the 
Brancacci Chapel in the Church of the Carmelites, 
Florence. They consist of the following : * The 
Expulsion from Paradise,' * The Tribute Money,' 

* Peter Baptizing,' * Peter curing the Blind and 
Lame,' * The Death of Ananias,' * Simon Magus,' 
and the * Eesuscitation of the King's Sob.' 
Here also is a single fresco by Masolino, 

* Preaching of Peter.' Heads attributed to 
Masaccio in some galleries — as, for example, in 
the National Gallery — ^are doubtful. 

Paolo Uccello, another of this school, is cele- 
brated for his application of the laws of perspec- 
tive to painting. Our National Gallery contains 
an important work by him, the * Battle of Sant' 
Egidio,' No, 583 ; and in the Louvre there is a 
portrait group deserving of attention, No. 184. 

The next painter of importance of the Floren- 



OF PAINTING IN ITALY. 



11 



tine school was Filippo Lippi, a Carmelite monk, 
whose style was formed chiefly on that of 
Masaccio. His most important works are the 
frescoes in the choir of the Duomo at Prato, 
representing the history of St. Stephen, that of 
John the Baptist, and several figures of saints. 
They are full of action, and show a close study 
of nature. In the Accademia at Florence is his 
best easel picture. No. 41, a ^ Coronation of the 
Virgin,' with numerous figures of pretty children, 
but without dignity of treatment; and there is 
also there an inferior * Madonna ajid Saints,' No. 
40. Perhaps more lovely works could not be 
found than the two semi-lunar panels in tempera 
in our National Gallery, Nos. 666, 667. For 
tender gradations of colour and modelling, and for 
delicate expression, they are remarkable produc- 
tions. There is a fine ' Madonna adoring the Infant 
Christ,' highly finished, a signed picture. No. 69 in 
the Royal Museum, Berlin. An admirable example 
is in the Louvre, No. 234 ; and a no less excellent 
work is No. 1307 in the Uffizi at Florence. 

Of Filippo's pupils Sandro Botticelli was the 
most eminent. He was one of the earliest (among 
whom Squarcione also was distinguished) to re- 
present classical allegories in his pictures. An 
excellent example of his style is * Tobit and the 
Angel,' No. 98 in the Turin Gallery. In the 
Uffizi there is also a charming oval picture by 
him of the * Madonna crowned by Angels,' No. 
1289, and a fine * Adoration of the Kings ' is No. 



FUippo 
Lippu 



Sandro 
BoUicellu 



12 



THE RISE AND. PROGRESS 



1286 ; while his power as a fresco painter may be 
seen in the three frescoes, * Moses killing the 
Egyptian/ * Kebellion of Korah/ and the * Temp- 
tation of Christ,' all in the Sistine Chapel. 
There are several pictures at Berlin, of which 
Nos. 102 and 106 are the finest: the latter is 
extremely beautiful and in good condition. For 
other examples see the catalogue at the end of 
this volume. A good ' Madonna and Child ' is 
No. 11 at the Stadel Gallery, Frankfort. In our 
National Gallery are two specimens attributed 
to him of an attempt to render mythological 
subjects, Nos. 915, 916 ; but much more pleasing 
is a circular panel of the ^ Virgin and Child with 
two Angels,' No. 275. The Louvre possesses a 
charming work. No. 196. 

Botticelli's pupil, Filippino Lippi, so called to 
distinguish him from his father Filippo, whom 
he far excelled, is the next painter in order 
belonging to the Florentine school. Some of his 
best works are those in fresco in the Capella di 
Filippo Strozzi in S. Maria Novella, and those 
in the Brancacci Chapel of the Carmine at 
Florence, where he also completed some others 
left unfinished by Masaccio at his death. Those 
by Filippino are 'The Fall of Adam and Eve,' 
* Peter in Prison,' * The Martyrdom of Peter,' 
'The Liberation of Peter,' and a part of the 
'Resuscitation of the King's Son.' Of his oil- 
pictures the finest is ' The Madonna appearing 
to S. Bernardino ' in the Church of the Badia at 



OF FAINTING IN ITALY. 



13 



Verrocohio. 



Florence. An excellent * Madonna and Child,' 
full of grace and beauty, is No. 82 at Berlin: 
another is No. 35 at Dresden. In our National 
Gallery are two works in tempera by the master, 
a small ' Adoration of the Magi,' No. 592, and 
a ' Virgin and Child with Saints,' No. 293. 

Andrea Verrocchio (1432-1488) was first a 
sculptor, and is famous chiefly as the master of 
Leonardo da Vinci. But few works can be 
attributed to him: one, well known, is in the 
Accademia at Florence, No. 43 (see p. 31); 
and another is in the Hermitage, St. Petersburg, 
a * Madonna enthroned with Angels,' No. 1. 
There is a * Madonna and Child,' without a 
number, at Berlin. 

Lorenzo di Credi was a pupil of Verrocchio, 
and executed some good works in a style of 
elaborate finish, the best examples of which are 
a * Virgin and Child with Saints,' No. 177 in the 
Louvre ; a * Virgin and Child,' No. 593, and 
another. No. 648, in our National Gallery; a 
^Madonna adoring the Infant Christ,' No. 100, 
and a * Kneeling Magdalen,' No. 103, at Berlin. 
A good small ' Noli me Tangere ' is at the 
Louvre without a number. At Dresden are 
several works, of which Nos. 2385 and 2386 are 
the best. At Munich is a * Nativity,' No. 553 : 
an almost exact replica of the same subject is 
No. 1287 at the Uffizi, Florence. 

Antonio Pollajuolo, bom about 1429, worked 
as a goldsmith and sculptor, but nevertheless 



L. di Credi, 



Antonio 
Pollajuolo. 



14 



THE RISE AND PBOORESS 



Domenico 

Ohirlan- 

dajo. 



executed some excellent works in the style of 
Botticelli. His principal work is in our National 
Gallery, the * Martyrdom of St. Sebastian,' No. 
292, besides two smaller but more pleasing 
pictures, Nos. 296 and 781. In the UflBzi there 
are two works said to be by Antonio and his 
brother Pietro, Nos. 1153 and 1301. 

Domenico Ghirlandajo (1449-98), also a Floren- 
tine, was another of the principal painters who 
flourished towards the end of. this century, and 
who ranks high among his contemporaries. Some 
of his chief frescoes are those representing events 
from the 'Life of St. Francis' in the Sassetti 
Chapel in Santa Trinita at Florence ; and those 
in the choir of S. Maria Novella there are most 
admirable, both as regards composition and 
colour. Ghirlandajo was also a worker in mosaics. 
One of his best oil-paintings is the * Adoration of 
the Shepherds ' in the Florentine Academy, No. 
50. Other fine works are the ' Visitation,' No. 204 
in the Louvre, and an * Adoration of the Kings ' 
in the Pitti at Florence, No. 358. Ghirlandajo 
was for three years the master of Michael 
Angelo. 

Francesco Granacci was a scholar of Ghir- 
landajo, and painted with the master as well as 
separately much in his style. A joint work is a 
fine ' Madonna and Saints,' No. 88 in the Berlin 
Museum; No. 97 is by Granacci himself. At 
the Hermitage, St. Petersburg, a * Madonna and 
Saints adaring the Infant Christ,' No. 22, of 



Granacci. 



OF PAINTING IN ITALY, 15 



excellent quality, is attributed to him. (Said to 
be by Ghirlandajo : C. and C.) 

Luca Signorelli of Cortona, after Ghirlandajo, 
was one of the most original painters of his time. 
The important frescoes in the great Capella 
Brizio in the Cathedral at Orvieto are his best 
works. They represent *The ffistory of Anti- 
christ,' * The Eesurrection of the Dead,' * Hell,' 
and ' Paradise.' In all these the drawing of the 
figure is executed in a masterly manner. Very 
recently the National Gallery has acquired a 
fresco by him, representing * The Triumph of 
Chastity,' No. 910. Not many pictures exist in 
public museums. An important work, without a 
number, entitled * Pan and Music,' but unequal 
in quality, is at Berlin ; where also are two others. 
A ' Holy Family,' circular in form, is to be seen 
at Dresden, No. 21. 

Benozzo Gozzoli painted much in the style of 
Eiesole, whose pupil he was. There is a fine 
* Madonna and Child enthroned with Saints,' No. 
283, and a small picture of the * Bape of Helen,' 
No. 591, both in our National Gallery. In the 
Louvre is to be seen a * Triumph of St. Thomas 
Aquinas,' No. 72, by him. He also executed some 
frescoes on the vaulted roofs of the Capella 
Brizio just referred to, but they are greatly 
inferior both to those of his master and to those 
of Signorelli existing in close proximity. 

The last painter of the Florentine school of 
the fifteenth century who must be mentioned here 



Luca 
Signorelli. 



Benozzo 
Gozzoli, 



16 



THE RISE AND PROGRESS 



Cosimo 
RosselU. 



P.di 
Cosimo. 



Piero della 
Francesco, 



Mehzzo da 
Forli. 



is Cosimo Eosselli (1439-1 506). He was doubtless 
a painter at the same time as Gozzoli, and their 
works show some resemblance to each other. 
The chief productions of Eosselli are his frescoes 
on the walls of the Sistine Chapel at Rome and 
a wall painting in a chapel in S. Ambrogio at 
Florence. Some good works by him are to 
be seen at Berlin, Nos. 59, 71, 75 : another is 
in the Louvre, No. 364. 

Piero di Cosimo, pupil of the preceding,. should 
be named here. He is well represented in our 
own National Gallery by the ' Death of Procris,' 
No. 692 ; in the Louvre by a ' Coronation of the 
Virgin,' No. 291 ; and at Berlin by a * Venus and 
Sleeping Mars,' No. 107. 

Viexo della Francesca, an Umbrian by birth, 
successfully combined the feeling of his school 
with the manner of the Florentines. He also 
improved much on the existing medium of oil- 
painting as practised by the painters of Florence, 
and executed besides some excellent works in 
fresco, of which those in the Church of San 
Francesco at Arezzo are striking examples. As 
specimens of Piero's work, the * Baptism of 
Christ/ No. 665 in our National Gallery, and 
two portraits forming a diptych. No. 1300 in the 
Uffizi at Florence, may be noted. Piero's influence 
extended to Umbria through his connection with 
Melozzo da Forli, whose best production, a fresco 
transferred to canvas, an 'Audience of Sixtus 
IV.,' No. 31 in the Vatican, displays much of 



OF r PAINTING IN ITALY. 



17 



the quality of Piero*8 work. Another fresco by 
Melozzo is on the staircase of the Quirinal Palace 
at Eome. Two works are ascribed to him in 
our National Gallery, Nos. 755, 756 ; another at 
Berlin, No. 54. 

It will be necessary at this point to go back a 
few years in the history of art — that is, towards 
the commencement of the fifteenth century — and 
to trace the lives of two painters whose works 
influenced to a large extent the Venetian school 
about to be considered. The earlier of these was 
Gentile da Fabriano (about 1370 to 1450), by 
birth an Umbrian. He lived and worked for 
some years at Venice, where he left his mark on 
the school through his pupil and future friend 
Jacopo Bellini. About 1422 Gentile da Fabri- 
ano went to Florence, and shortly after executed 
his finest work, the * Adoration of the Kings,' 
No. 32, Salle des Gds. Tableaux, in the Floren- 
tine Academy, a painting rich in ornamentation 
and in elaborate detail. Very few other pictures 
by this painter are to be found, except those in 
the Brera at Milan, a * Glorification of the 
Virgin,' No. 147, and four single figures of saints, 
Nos. 166 to 171. 

The second master was Antonello da Messina, 
bom there during the first half of the century. 
He is said to have been so impressed with the 
beauty of the then new oil medium for painting 
— first seen in Naples in an altar-piece by Jan 
van Eyck, sent to King Alfonso— that he made 

c 



Gentile da 
Fabriano. 



Antonello 
da Messina, 



18 



THE BISE AND PBOGBESS 



Muranese 
painters, 
\hth cen- 
tury. 



The Viva- 
rini. 



a journey to Flanders, learned the secret and 
brought it back with him to Italy. For an ex- 
ample of portraiture with high finish, see a 
small picture without a number in the Salon 
Carr^ of the Louvre. Another exquisite example 
is No. 18 in the Berlin Museum ; where also 
is a very fine ' Madonna and Child,' No. 13. His 
little * Crucifixion' in the Antwerp Museum, No. 
17, is well known as an example of his realistic 
treatment of a sacred subject. His manner is 
seen again in the * Christ at the Column,' No. 
264 in the Venetian Academy. A * Saint Sebas- 
tian ' is ascribed to him at Dresden, No. 2382. 
An example, ' Christ as Salvator Mundi,' is in 
our National Gallery, No. 673, and is one of his 
earliest works. An altar-piece dated 1473 and 
some other pictures were executed by Antonello 
in Sicily. 

At the very beginning of the fifteenth century 
two new schools of art sprung up in North Italy — 
namely, the Venetian and the Paduan. Although 
quite distinct in character, they influenced each 
other considerably. 

Among the earliest records of Venetian art 
appears the name of Jacobello del Fiore, who 
painted between 1400 and 1439, and must be 
mentioned, although he and his fellow-workers 
were much inferior to their contemporaries the 
Vivarini, who arose in the neighbouring island 
of Murano. One example of Jacobello's work 
will Buffice, a ^ Madonna and Saints,' No. 22 in 



OF PAINTING IN ITALY, 19 



the Accademia at Venice. Giovanni and Antonio 
Vivarini (known as Giovanni and Antonio da 
Murano, and the former also as Johannes Ale- 
mannus) worked together from 1440 to 1447, 
afterwards separately. Examples of the first- 
named period are Nos. 8 and 23 in the Venetian 
Academy. Antonio is believed to have been a 
pupil of Gentile da Fabriano, the Umbrian 
painter. A very important work by him is in 
the Berlin Museum, an * Adoration of the Kings,' 
No. 5, full of figures, profusely adorned with 
gold ornaments in high relief. Soon after, 
Bartolommeo Vivarini joined his brother Antonio, 
and a fine example of their united work is an 
altar-piece, No. 205 in the Pinacoteca at Bologna. 
Subsequently painting by himself, Bartolommeo 
produced many superior works, of which the 
following are examples : a * Virgin and four 
Saints,' No. 1 in the Venetian Academy ; a 
'Virgin and Child,' No. 284 in our National 
Gallery ; a rotable in five panels. No. 58, Salle 
II. 1®' etage, at Vienna; and a fine * Madonna 
and Saints,' No. 35, Sala Grande, in the Museum 
at Naples. Others are at Berlin, No. 1160, and 
at Bergamo. Luigi Vivarini followed in the 
latter part of this century : for an example of 
his work, see the fine * Madonna and Saints,' No. 
561 in the Accademia at Venice, and an altar- 
piece, No. 38 in the Berlin Museum. The 
school was continued in the person of Andrea 
da Murano, whom it suffices to name. 

2 



20 



TEE RISE AND PROGRESS 



renetian 
Scho<^,l5th 
centwy. 

The 
Bellini, 



Gentile. 



Giovanni 



But the chief head of the Veoetian school 
was Jacopo Bellini (1395-1470), father of the 
more celebrated Gentile and Giovanni Bellini. 
He was the pupil of Gentile da Fabriano, and 
but little now remains of his work. One example 
only, that of a * Virgin and Child,' No. 443, 
Museum of Venice, can be referred to. A large 
canvas and some frescoes at Verona are attri- 
buted to him. 

Of old Bellini's sons more is known : the elder. 
Gentile (1421-1507), who was much inferior to 
his brother Giovanni, painted * The Preaching of 
St. Mark at Alexandria,' No. 155 in the Brera at 
Milan, and two large pictures in the Venetian 
Academy, the * Miracle of the True Cross,' No. 
529, and the 'True Cross borne in Procession,' 
No. 555 — all characteristic works. In the same 
style is the * Reception of Venetian Ambassadors,' 
No. 68 at the Louvre ; where are the two heads 
in one frame, very finely painted. No. 69. 

Among the chief productions of Giovanni 
Bellini (1426-1516) are an admirable altar- 
piece in the Sacristy of S. Maria dei Frari at 
Venice ; a large picture, * Christ at Emmaus,' in 
San Salvatore there ; and a fine * Transfiguration ' 
in the Naples Museum, No. 33, Sala di Eaphaelo. 
Our National Gallery contains several works by 
the master: namely, an important composition, 
the ' Death of St. Peter Martyr,' No. 812 ; a 
'Madonna and Child,' No. 280; and two fine 
portraits, one of the Doge Loredano, No. 189, 



OF PAINTING IN ITALY. 



21 



and of a Dominican, No. 808. Three beautiful 
examples, a * Virgin and Child/ No. 94, a 

* Madonna and Saints,' No. 424, a * Madonna with 
six Saints and Angels,' No. 38, and others, are 
in the Venetian Academy, besides a series of 
five allegorical paintings, Nos. 234 to 238. A 
fine ^Dead Christ,' painted in grisaille, is No. 
583 in the Uffizi. But a grandly painted ' Pieta,' 
in warm colour, is No. 4 at Berlin, in which the 
head of Christ is very beautiful. A small work, 
' Madonna and Saints,' is No. 4 in the Hermitage, 
St. Petersburg. The Louvre possesses a. charm- 
ing specimen of the master, a * Virgin and Child 
with two Saints,' No. 69 bis. Bellini has long 
been famous as the reputed chief master of 
Titian, an honour of which recent investigations 
have partially deprived him. Of Giovanni's 
followers who painted in the fifteenth century 
none are worthy of mention except Marco Basaiti, 
whose chief works were executed between 1470- 
1520, and are now in the Academy at Venice; 
besides which there are two examples in our 
National Gallery, Nos. 281, 599. 

Giambattista Cima da Conegliano was a 
meritorious painter of this school, by whom 
there are three examples in the National Gallery, 
an ' Infant Christ with the Virgin,' No. 300, the 
'Incredulity of St. Thomas,' No. 816, and a 

* Madonna and Child,' No 634. Other paintings 
by him are preserved at Venice in the Academy, 
and particularly a fine ^ St. John the Baptist and 



Basaiti. 



Cima da 
Conegliano, 



22 



THE RISE AND PROGRESS 



Carpaccio. 



Saints 'in S. M. dell' Orto. At Berlin there are 
two fine pictures, No. 2, * Madonna and Child 
enthroned with Saints/ and an admirable 
* Miracle of St. Mark,' No. 15, suggesting the 
manner of Gentile Bellini. A good * Virgin and 
Child with Saints ' is No. 173 in the Louvre. 

Carpaccio is another Venetian painter follow- 
ing in the steps of the Bellini who must be 
referred to here. His most successful work, a 
series of nine scenes from the life of St. Ursula, 
Nos. 533, 37, 39, 42, 44, 46, 49, 54, 60 in the 
Academy at Venice, are excellent productions of 
the school and time, of which the best is the 
*Eeception of the Envoys,' No. 539. Also at 
Venice is a fine 'Presentation in the Temple,' 
No. 488; while there is one example in the 
Louvre, No. 123 ; and others are at Berlin, No. 
23, * St. Peter blessing Saints,' and No. 14, the 
latter catalogued as * Santa Croce.' 

Carlo Crivelli of Venice, who was a pupil 
of Jacobello del Fiore, painted during the latter 
half of the fifteenth and beginning of the six- 
teenth centuries, and must not be overlooked, for 
his work is very characteristic and conscientious 
so far as it goes. He is nowhere better seen than 
in our National Gallery. Nos. 724 and 788 are 
very fine examples of how Crivelli loaded his 
pictures with elaborate detail, such as jewels, 
fruit, and raised gilt ornaments. Another large 
altar-piece is in the Brera at Milan, No. 149, also 
very richly decorated. A small * Annunciation * 



Carlo 
Crivelli, 



OF PAINTING IN ITALY. 



23 



Paduan 

School,l^th 

century. 



Andrea 
Mantegna, 



on two panels should be noted, Nos. 14 and 15 
at the Stadel, Frankfort. 

The founder of the Paduan school was Fran- 
cesco Squarcione, who derived his inspiration 
chiefly from a careful study of the antique. 
Perhaps no other master had a greater number 
of pupils, for he was more celebrated as a teacher 
than as a painter, and few of his works have been 
preserved. 

Among his numerous foUowers the most re- 
nowned was Andrea Mantegna (1430-1506). 
This great painter, whose influence was felt in 
all the schools of Italy, was a Paduan by birth, 
but he finally settled in Mantua, where most of 
his principal works were executed. His master- 
piece was certainly the 'Triumph of Julius Caesar,' 
painted originally for the Duke of Mantua — a 
series of nine grand cartoons, much injured by 
time, and now to be seen in the gallery at 
Hampton Court Palace. The small highly- 
finished studies for these works are now at 
Vienna, Nos. 42 to 45, and Nos. 47 to 50, Salle 
VI. 1®' etage. Other important works by thip 
master are the frescoes in the Church of the 
Eremitani at Padua, representing scenes from 
the * Life of St. Jacob ' and the * Martyrdom of 
St. Christopher.' In all these the drawing and 
action of the human figure are excellent, and the 
architectural details of the background admirably 
rendered. There are also two good examples of 
Mantegna's work, Nos. !274, 902, in the National 



24 



TEE RISE AND PROGRESS 



Gallery ; the * Madonna della Vittoria/ No. 250, 
the * Christ between Thieves,' No. 249, the 
' Parnassus/ No. 251, and the * Expulsion of the 
Vices,' No. 253, represent him in the Louvre ; 
and a * Madonna enthroned with Angels and 
Saints ' may be seen in the Church of San Zeno 
at Verona; while in the Brera at Milan is a 
highly-finished work in twelve compartments. 
No. 168. At Frankfort is a ' St. Mark,' No. Is! 
At Berlin there are two works, a small ' Madonna 
and Child surrounded by Cherubs,' No. 27, and 
a * Presentation in the Temple,' No. 29. Besides 
these a very fine * Dead Christ and two Angels,' 
No. 28, life-size, was long attributed to him, but 
is now regarded as the work of Giovanni Bellini 
under the influence of Mantegna. Besides being 
celebrated as a painter, Mantegna was one of the 
first engravers of his time, and executed several 
works with his own hand. 

Other followers of Squarcione were Stefano da 
Ferrara and Cosimo Tura, natives of Ferrara. 
There is a large altar-piece in the Brera at 
Milan by the former, No. 195; but the latter 
can only properly be studied in the Gallery and 
Cathedral of his native town, although there are 
three fair examples of his work in our National 
Gallery, Nos. 590, 772, 773. One of extraordi- 
nary beauty is in the Museum at Berlin, No. Ill, 
a 'Madonna enthroned with Saints,' full of 
elaborately painted detail, much suggesting the 
work of Andrea Mantegna. Three works by him 



School of 
Ferrara, 
15th cen- 
tury. 



OF PAINTING IN ITALY. 



25 



are in the Ferrara Gallery, Nos. 121, 122, and 
123. 

Some of the schools which in a certain sense 
received their inspiration from Mantegna must 
be briefly noticed. Bartolommeo Montagna was 
an early master of Vicenza, whose works are to 
be found almost exclusively in his native city, 
with the exception of a fine altar-piece in the 
Brera at Milan, No. 158, and a * Madonna 
Enthroned,' No. 44 at Berlin. But Verona pro- 
duced more painters of individual merit at this 
period than did the other northern capitals. 
Among the earliest are Francesco Bonsignori 
and Liberale, but space will not allow of more 
than the mere mention of their names. The two 
Morones, father and son (not to be confounded 
with the later master, Giambattista Moroni of 
Brescia), and Girolamo dai Libri are more im- 
portant. Of Domenico Morone little is known, 
but the work of his son Francesco may be seen 
in Santa Maria in Organa at Verona, besides 
a picture in the Brera at Milan, No. 169, a 
* Madonna,' No. 46 at Berlin, and one in our 
National Gallery, No. 285. Girolamo dai Libri 
was notably fond of introducing landscape into 
his pictures, which are best seen at Verona in 
the Museum and churches. There is a * Madonna 
Enthroned,' No. 30 at Berlin. Caroto was another 
Veronese painter whose works frequently bear a 
close resembl««ice to those of Mantegna. Several 
good ewmples are in the Verona Gallerj, oVJast^Y 



School of 
Verona^ 
15th cen- 
tury. 

Montagna, 



D, Morons, 
F, Morone, 



Dai Libri, 



Caroto, 



26 



TEE BISE AND PE0OEE88 



Umbrian 

School,lbth 

century. 



are at Berlin, No. 40, and at f rankfort, No. 45. 
Cavazzoia, Paolo Moiandi, called Cavazzola, was a pupil of 
Morone and a worthy master of this school. His 
works are chiefly in Verona, but our National 
Gallery contains two fair examples, Nos. 735 and 
777. 

Meanwhile, besides those already noticed, a 
third school, namely that of Umbria, was growing 
into importance, which was destined subsequently 
to exercise a great influence upon Eapharcl, the 
renowned chief of the Eoman school. The 
practice of art in Umbria developed a character 
widely differing from that of the Florentine 
school. A deep religious enthusiasm pervades 
the works of the Umbrians, and the first master 
to manifest this tendency in a decided form was 
Niccol6 di Foligno, known as Niccolb Alunno. 
Perhaps his best works are an ' Annimciation ' in 
the Accademia at Perugia, No. 75 ; a panel painted 
on both sides in the Bologna Gallery, No. 360 ; 
and two fine pictures in the Vatican collection. 
The Louvre possesses an example in the *Six 
Scenes from the Life of Christ,' No. 31. But 
the delineation of religious sentiment was more 
fully developed, while technical quality attained 
a higher perfection, in the works of Pietro 
Perugino (1446-1524), so called from Perugia, 
where he passed most of his life, although 
bom at Gitta delle Pieve, a small neighbouring 
Etrurian town. He painted both in tempera and 
in oil, but principally in the latter, surpassing 



Niccolo 
Alunno, 



Pietro 
Perugino, 



OF PAINTING IN ITALY. 27 



even his Florentine rivals in brilliance and 
warmth of colouring. His works are very numer- 
ous. Some of the most important are the frescoes 
which adorn the walls of the Sala del Cambio in 
the Collegio del Cambio at Perugia. Two other 
fine frescoes by him exist ; one, a representation of 
the * Birth of Christ,' is in the Accademia there, 
and the other, an ' Adoration of the Magi,' is in 
S. Maria di Bianchi at Citta delle Pieve. Among 
the best of Perugino's oil-paintings are a 

* Madonna Enthroned' in the Bologna Gallery, 
No. 197 ; a lovely ' Virgin and Child,' No. 12, 
Salle III. 1®' etage at Vienna; a very fine 
triptych in the National Gallery, of which the 
centre panel is a * Virgin adoring the Infant 
Christ,' No. 288 ; and an admirable 'Deposition,' 
No. 164, belonging to his best period, in the 
Pitti at Florence. In the Church of S. Pietro 
at Perugia are a grand * Pieta ' and three small 
and highly-finished pictures of saints. The 
Louvre possesses two fair examples, a * Virgin 
and Child with Saints,' No. 442, and a ' Combat 
between Love and Chastity,' No. 445. A large 

* Ascension,' painted originally for S. Pietro, 
is now in the Lyons Museum, No. 156; while 
the well-known * Marriage of the Virgin' (from 
which Baphael drew his inspiration for the cele- 
brated *Lo Sposalizio') is in the Caen Museum. 
Two characteristic and life-like profile heads, No. 
18, Salle des petits Tableaux in the Florentine 
Academy, are excellent examples of what the 



28 



TEE RISE AND PROGRESS 



hio. 



master was capable of when not restricted by 
traditional rules. His great pupil was Eaphael, 
presently to be noticed ; but among those who 
closely followed his style Bernardino Pinturicchio 
is the best known. Still his work was more 
realistic than that of the master, and he was 
engaged chiefly as an historical painter. His 
decorations of the Library and Baptistry in the 
Duomo of Siena and some paintings in the 
Accademia at Perugia are his most important 
works. The National Gallery has recently 
obtained an interesting fresco transferred to 
canvas, No. 911, by Pinturicchio, besides three 
other works already there, illustrations of the 
story of Griselda, Nos. 912, 913, 914. Similar 
compositions are the ' History of Tobias,' Nos. 
142, 149 at Berlin ; where there is also a large 
' Adoration of the Magi,' No. 132. A good work 
is in the Pitti at Florence, No. 341; and one 
in the Louvre, No. 292, which may be either 
by Pinturicchio or by a less known but equally 
gifted follower of Perugino, Giovanni di Pietro, 
called Lo Spagna. He was an established painter 
at Spoleto in 1516. Some of his works are yet 
there, but his masterpiece, the * Madonna En- 
throned/ is in the Chapel of S. Stefano in the 
Lower Church of S. Francesco at Assisi. Two 
of his works may be seen in our National Gallery, 
the * Glorification of the Virgin,' No. 282, and an 
*Ecce Homo,' No. 691; one in the Louvre, a 
* Nativity,' No. 214 bis; while in the Vatican 



/O Spagna. 



OF PAINTING IN ITALY. 



29 



there is a large ' Nativity ' by him. Some ad- 
mirable frescoes by the master are in the Church 
of S. M. degli Angeli near Assisi. 

A fourth school, the Bolognese, famous for 
having produced, in the person of Francia, a 
worthy rival of the masters of Florence, Venice, 
and Perugia, came into notice about this time. 
One of its earliest masters was another painter of 
the numerous school of Squarcione, Marco Zoppo 
by name. His few remaining works, of which 
there is a good specimen in the National Gallery, 
No. 597, bear dates from 1471-1498. His great 
pupil, Francesco Francia, who is more properly 
considered to be the founder of the Bolognese 
school, was much superior to him in every way, 
although Francia's work always retained some- 
thing of the traditional conventionality of the 
age. His compositions are warm and rich in 
colouring, and bear a close affinity to those of 
Perugino in this respect ; but his figures are less 
constrained in their action, and have more in- 
dividuality than those of the latter. In S. 
Giacomo Maggiore at Bologna there is one oif 
the finest altar-pieces of the master ; and at St. 
Cecilia there are some important frescoes, besides 
several altar-pieces in the Pinacoteca, of which the 
best is a ' Madonna and Child with Saints,' No. 78, 
an ' Annunciation with Saints,' No. 79, and a 
* Madonna and Child with St. Paul and St. 
Francis,' No. 372. There is a fine altar-piece in 
the Pinacoteca at Munich, No. 577; another, 



Bolognese 
School, ibth 
century. 



Marco 
Zoppo, 



Francesco 
Francia. 



30 



THE BISE AND PB0GRES8 



Lorenzo 
Costa, 



Lombard 

School,15th 

century, 

Leonardo 
da Vinci, 



' Virgin Enthroned,' is No. 69 at the Hermitage, 

St. Petersburg, where also is a good * Madonna 

and Child, No. 68 ; and an admirable ' Madonna 

and Child ' may be seen in the Borghese Palace 

at Eome, No. 43, Room II. Some works are 

attributed to him at Berlin, of which one only, 

No. 127, need be noted, a * St. Stephen and John 

the Baptist,' and this has been much repaired. 

In the Louvre at Paris a fine portrait. No. 318, 

is attributed to Francia; and the National 

Gallery has a good specimen in the form of an 

altar-piece. No. 288. Of his scholars Lorenzo 

Costa of Ferrara is the most important. He 

assisted his master in the St. Cecilia frescoes, 

and there are several examples of his work at 

Bologna and Mantua, of very unequal quality, 

most of it being much inferior to that of Francia. 

An altar-piece forms No. 629 in the National 

Gallery. An important work, a * Presentation 

in the Temple,' is No. 112 at Berlin. Equally 

so is the * Baptism of Christ,' No. 437 at Dresden. 

Another is * The Court of Isabella d'Este,' No. 

175 in the Louvre. 

Having followed these four schools thus far, 
and before considering the great cinquecento 
masters, it will be well to notice first the gifted 
painter, Leonardo da Vinci, who immediately 
preceded them. His influence was largely felt 
in North Italy, and he is to be regarded as the 
head of the Lombard or Milanese school. 

Bom at Vinci near Florence, a.d. 1452, he 



OF PAINTING IN ITALY. 31 

holds a middle position between the quattrp- 
cento and the cinquecento masters, for although 
he far excels the former, yet he cannot be alto- 
gether classed with those who carried art to its 
highest state of perfection in the sixteenth cen- 
tury. Leonardo was one of the most accomplished 
men of the time, and was not only painter, but 
scidptor, musician, and poet. He also gave 
much time to the study of anatomy, mechanics, 
and mathematics; and he effected considerable 
improvements in relation to military science and 
engineering ; painting was nevertheless his favour- 
ite pursuit. Leonardo da Vinci was a pupil of 
Andrea Verrocchio, and from this master he doubt- 
less derived his inclination for the study of sculp- 
ture and painting. In the Florentine Academy 
there is a well-known picture. No. 43, of the 
* Baptism of Christ,' by Verrocchio, which contains 
a single figure, an angel, painted by the pupil, 
the superiority of which to the rest of the com- 
position is very striking. Some of Leonardo's 
works are still extant, although probably most 
of those attributed to him were executed by 
his followers. Perhaps his most famous work 
is the * Last Supper ' on a wall in the Dominican 
Convent of the Madonna delle Grazie at Milan. 
Owing to many reasons, and more particularly 
to the fact that it was painted in oil, instead of 
in fresco, this great work has long been a wreck, 
and very little of the original quality now re- 
mains. There is a good copy of it by one of 



32 



THE RISE AND PB0GRE88 



Bernardino 
Luini, 



Leonardo's followers, Marco d'Oggione, formerly 
in the Certosa of Pavia, now in the possession of 
the Eoyal Academy of London. As examples of 
Da Vinci's authenticated easel pictures, there is 
a half-length figure of a youthful *John the 
Baptist ' in the Louvre, No. 480 ; where is also 
the celebrated * Mona Lisa,' No. 484. No. 483, 
another female head, exquisitely finished, may 
also be by his hand. Others so attributed are 
doubtful. Besides these, a charming profile 
portrait — originally believed to be that of Isabella 
of Arragon, wife of Giovanni Galeazzo Sforza, but 
now more correctly regarded as a likeness of 
Maria Bianca, the second wife of Maximilian I. 
of Austria — is preserved, together with some 
drawings in red chalk, in the Ambrosiana of 
Milan. Li the Hermitage, St. Petersburg, is a 
highly-finished work, a * Madonna and Saints,' 
No. 14, beautiful both for expression and exe- 
cution. Two other paintings there are attri- 
buted to him by Waagen, both of exquisite 
quality — a beautiful semi-nude, somewhat re- 
sembling the * Mona Lisa ' in the Louvre, No. 15 ; 
and a small * Madonna and Child,' No. 13a. 
Another small ' Madonna,' exhibiting marvellous 
finish, is ascribed to him at Dresden, No. 30. 

As it is difficult to determine the authorship of 
some works of this period, which might equally 
belong to Leonardo and to his best pupil Bernar- 
dino Luini, it will be well to consider the latter 
at the same time. Luini was most celebrated as 



OF PAINTING IN ITALY, 33 



a fresco painter. His finest works of this kind 
are the wdrll paintings in the church at Sarona, 
representing scenes from the history of the 
Virgin; those in the Church of Santa Maria 
degli Angeli at Lugano, and the frescoes which 
decorate the inner and outer Church of San 
Maurizio Maggiore at Milan. All these are 
very remarkable productions, and especially the 
last named, whether we regard composition, colour, 
or execution. Besides these, there is a fine fresco 
in a room in the Ambrosiana at Milan, of the 
' Scourging of Christ,' of which the centre com- 
partment at least is the woik of Luini. Others 
are in the Brera there. In the National Gallery 
the well-known painting 'Christ disputing with 
the Doctors' ("School of Leonardo da Vinci," 
No. 18) is perhaps one of the finest of his 
numerous oil-paintings. He is seen to great 
advantage in the Louvre, three of the examples 
there being very admirable: a 'Holy Family,' 
No. 240 ; a ' Sleeping Jesus,' No. 241 ; and a 
'Salome with the Head of John the Baptist,' 
No. 242. Some well-preserved frescoes are also 
to be seen in the hall through which the Salon 
Carre is entered. But not less beautiful are the 
examples by this master in the Hermitage, 
St. Petersburg — ^viz. a ' Madonna and Child,' 
No. 71 ; a ' St. Catharine,' No. 72 ; a life-size 
' St. Sebastian,' but a portrait (of the Duke of 
Sforza), No. 73 ; and the marvellous ' Colombine,' 
No. 74. For charm of expression, perfection of 



34 



THE RISE AND PROGRESS 



Beltraffio, 



modelling, and delicate finish, this exquisite 
female portrait ranks among the finest produc- 
tions of any age. It is impossible to examine 
these beautiful works, especially those in Milan, 
without feeling the highest admiration for the 
genius of their author. 

A less important follower of Leonardo da Vinci 
was Giovanni Antonio Beltraffio, who, although 
he worked only as an amateur, must not be 
omitted here. A charming painting of its ki^d 
is in our National Gallery, No. 728, the * Madonna 
and Child ;' and another good example is in the 
Louvre, No. 71 ; but naturally his works are 
rarely met with. 

Another painter of the Lombard school, but 
likewise somewhat influenced by the Florentine 
and Koman schools, was Gaudenzio Ferrari, a 
Piedmontese by birth. Some important frescoes 
by him are preserved in the Brera at Milan, 
where there is also one of his largest oil-paint- 
ings, the ' Martyrdom of St. Catharine,' No. 447, 
a daring composition, full of life and action. The 
Minorite Church at Varallo contains other frescoes 
by Gaudenzio, of the ' History of Christ.' 

Two other Lombard painters may be briefly 
mentioned — namely, Ambrogio Borgognone and 
Andrea Solario, both bom between 1450 and 1460. 
Borgognone, first known by his works at the 
Certosa at Pavia, subsequently gained quality 
from the influence of Leonardo da Vinci at 
Milan, where he painted some fine frescoes for 



Oaudenzio 
Ferrari. 



Ambrogio 
Borgo- 
gnone. 



OF FAINTING IN ITALY, 35 



the dome of San Simpliciano. There are three 
examples at the Brera, all inferior. Some of 
his best works are at Berlin; see No. 51, a 
* Madonna and Child/ and No. 52, a ' Madonna 
Enthroned.' One at the National Gallery (from 
the neighbourhood of the Certosa of Pavia) is 
No. 298, a 'Marriage of St. Catharine;' two 
smaller works are Nos. 779 and 780. 

Andrea Solario, also educated in the Milanese 
school, wias influenced subsequently by Florence 
and by Venice. Some of his works may be seen 
in the Louvre at Paris — No. 36, a * Crucifixion,' 
and Nos. 403 and 404; and in the Certosa of 
Pavia near Milan. Two portraits, one signed, 
one attributed to this master, are in the National 
Gallery, Nos. 734 and 923. 



SIXTEENTH CENTURY. 

The history of Art during the past two cen- 
turies describes the stages by which it progressed 
towards its highest achievements in the famous 
sixteenth century, or the age of the " Cinque- 
cento." It was at this period that a group of 
distinguished painters appeared, who not only 
surpassed all their predecessors, but have never 
been rivalled to the present day. Taking the 
order of their appearance, we may place in the 
first rank Michael Angelo, Titian, and Eaphael, 
all of whom, as well as Era Bartolommeo, whoj, 
somewhat the earliest in date, must be placed 

D 2 



Andrea 
Solario, 



86 



THE RISE AND PROGRESS 



Florentine 

School,\Qth 

century, 

Fra Barto- 
lommeo. 



far below the level of the matchless trio, were 
bom towards the latter end of the preceding 
century. These were followed by others in some 
points but little inferior — ^viz. Giorgione, Sebas- 
tiano del Piombo, Andrea del Sarto, Correggio, 
and Paolo Veronese, who were bom during a 
period comprised by the end of the fifteenth 
century and the beginning of the sixteenth. 

Fra Bartolommeo, or Baccio della Porta (1469- 
1517), first of the group, was a scholar of 
Cosimo Eosselli, but was much influenced by the 
works of Leonardo da Vinci, and subsequently 
through his friendship with Eaphael. Owing to 
Baccio's great grief at the loss of Savonarola, he 
gave up painting, and entered the Dominican 
Convent of S. Marco ; but after an interval of 
six years he once more resumed his favourite 
occupation. One of his finest productions is the 
well-known figure of *St. Mark,' No. 125 in the 
Pitti Palace at Florence ; where also may be seen 
a ' Deposition,' No. 64, a fine * Holy Family,' No. 
256, and others. An altar-piece, * Madonna en- 
throned with Saints,' in the Church of S. Marco, 
Florence, and a ' Presentation in the Temple,' in 
the Imperial Gallery at Vienna, No. 29 in the fourth 
room, are other good examples of his work. In 
the Uffizi is an admirable large altar-piece, which 
the master never lived to complete, representing 
the * Virgin and Child enthroned with Saints,' 
No. 1265. Besides these, there is a most interest- 
ing fresco of the ' Last Judgment ' in the Church 



OF PAINTING IN ITALY. 



37 



AJhertinelU. 



Michael 



of S. Maria Nuova, Florence. An example should 
be noted in the Louvre, a ' Marriage of St. Catha- 
rine,' No. 65. Fra Bartolommeo is said to be the 
first painter who used the lay-figure as a means 
of studying drapery. 

Mariotto Albertinelli was a scholar and assist- 
ant of Fra Bartolommeo, and they painted some 
pictures jointly. His own works much resemble 
those of the master. One example is in our 
National Gallery, No. 645. A fine one is No. 21, 
a * Madonna and Saints,' in the Hermitage, St. 
Petersburg. 

Six years after the birth of Fra Bartolommeo, 
and twenty-three after that of Leonardo, was born Z^"^^'^- 
Michael Angelo Buonarroti, who far outlived them 
both. Like Leonardo, he was at once a sculptor, 
painter, architect, and poet, besides being also a 
learned anatomist. At first he was apprenticed 
to Domenico Ghirlandajo in painting, but soon 
devoted his time to the practice of sculpture. 
His earliest known work in painting, now lost, 
was the celebrated cartoon of Pisa, executed in 
1504 ; and by his contemporaries it was con- 
sidered to be his masterpiece. Soon afterwards 
he undertook the decoration of the Sistine 
Chapel, which he is said to have accomplished 
without assistance in the space of three years. 
This magnificent series of frescoes is without doubt 
his most perfect achievement ; they are remark- 
able for a dignity and grandeur in composition 
and in conception of the human figure neyei>y^ 



38 



THE RISE AND PROGRESS 



>aniele da 
■olterra. 



ndrea del 
irto. 



perhaps before attained in this form of art. After 
completing these he was engaged on architectural 
works, and it was not until his sixtieth year that 
he was commissioned to paint the * Last Judg- 
ment * on the end wall of the Sistine Chapel. 
Very few oil-paintings are catalogued under the 
name of Michael Angelo, and of these it is im- 
possible to say which are genuine works. One, 
the most probable, is in the Tribune of the Uffizi 
at Florence, No. 1139. Two studies in tempera, 
in an unfinished state, are attributed to him in 
the National Gallery, Nos. 790 and 809. 

The last years of Michael Angelo's life were 
devoted to superintending the building of St. 
Peter's at Eome, which he did without receiving 
any remuneration. He died before his designs 
were completed, leaving them to be executed by 
others. 

The chief of his immediate scholars was 
Daniele da Volterra, whose principal work is a 
' Descent from the Cross ' in the Trinita di Monti 
at Rome. A good example of his work is the 
* Massacre of the Innocents ' in the Tribune of 
the Uffizi at Florence, No. 1107. The Louvre 
contains an uninteresting work, * David and 
Goliath,' painted on both sides of a slab of slate. 
No. 347. 

The next celebrated Florentine painter living 
at the beginning of the sixteenth century, who 
was much influenced by the works of Fra 
Bartolommeo and Michael Angelo, was Andrea 



OF PAINTING IN ITALY. 



39 



Vannucchi, called "Del Sarto." He formed a 
style peculiar to himself, manifest in the softness 
of execution, delicate modelling with correct draw- 
ing, and a peculiar greyness of colour, which his 
works exhibit. Among the earliest are three 
frescoes in the porch of the Compagnia della 
Scalzo at Florence, representing scenes from the 
life of John the Baptist ; after which is the fine 
series of six frescoes, illustrating the life of 
S. Filippo Benizzi, in the court of S. Annunziata 
at Florence. In the chapel of the same name is 
a celebrated *Holy Family,' known as the 

* Madonna del Sacco ;' while equally^ worthy of 
notice is a *Last Supper' painted for the re- 
fectory of S. Salvi near Florence. There is 
an excellent altar-piece in oil by him in the 
Tribime of the Uffizi, No. 1112; also a beautiful 

* Madonna and Child with St. John and St. 
Elizabeth,' No. 81, and a * Disputa della Trinita,' 
No. 172, in the Pitti Palace. A fine *Holy 
Family,' composed in that pyramidal form which 
the master so frequently aflfected, and of which 
it is a good example, exists in the Dulwich 
Gallery, No. 327. Another example of this is a 

* Holy Family,' No. 438 in the Louvre. In his 
later style is a *Carita,' which he executed in 
France while on a visit to Francis the First, 
now preserved in the Louvre, No. 437. Also 
two important paintings, a * Madonna enthroned 
with Saints,' in the Berlin Museum, No. 246 ; 
and a 'Sacrifice of Abrahaiji,' No. 44 in the 



40 



THE RISE AND PROGRESS 



Pontormo. 
Bronzino, 



Vasari. 



IJresden Gallery. In the Hermitage, St. Peters- 
burg, two finished works may be noted, both 
rather small — a * Holy Family,' No. 24, and a 
* St. Barbara/ No. 25. At Madrid are some fine 
examples, particularly No. 385, and No. 383, 
which is a very charming portrait of his wife : 
one somewhat similar is at Berlin, No. 240. In 
the National Gallery are attributed to him a 
good *Holy Family,* No. 17, and a portrait of 
himself, No. 690. 

After the death of Michael Angelo it was the 
ambition of the Florentine painters to study 
anatomy, and to produce works in his style. 
The natural consequence of this was that they 
became more or less mannered, and fettered by 
their sense of the importance of emphasising 
anatomical details in drawing the figure. A few, 
however, still maintained some originality and 
spirit in their works. Among these may be men- 
tioned Jacopo Pontormo and Angiolo Bronzino, 
both pupils of Andrea del Sarto, and both success- 
ful as portrait painters. Our National Gallery has 
an excellent example by the former, a portrait of 
a youth. No. 649; and one of a * Knight of St. 
Stephen * by Bronzino, No. 670 : there also is the 
finest work of the latter, a picture entitled 
^ Venus, Cupid, Folly, and Time,' No. 651. 
An admirable portrait by him is No. 125 in 
the Hermitage, St. Petersburg. Bronzino also 
was an intimate friend of Giorgio Vasari of 
Arezzo, one of the important men of his time. 



OF PAINTING IN ITALY, 



41 



to whom we are chiefly indebted for an excel- 
lent biography of the principal Italian painters, 
a work which is the foundation of much of 
our knowledge of early Italian art. Vasari 
executed numerous large oil-pictures, none of 
which have much merit; a fair but unpleasing 
example of his work is in the Pinacoteca at 
Bologna, No. 198. 

The great painter, who is regarded as possessing 

the best qualities of his contemporaries, and who 

combined with these a remarkable perception of 

beauty, and a certain grace peculiarly his own 

which showed itself in all his works, was Eaphael 

Sanzio, the son of Giovanni Sanzio of Urbino, 

bom 1473. It was from his father, who was 

likewise a painter, that Raphael received his 

first instructions in art, but at the early age 

of twelve he was placed under the care of Pietro 

Perugino. It has been usual to classify the 

production of Raphael's short but active life 

in three categories.* The first comprehends 

those works which were executed probably under 

the eye of his master, Perugino, and were 

certainly more or less distinguished by his 

manner. This period closes at about 1503, when 

he was in his twentieth year. The second period 

^tes from the impressions received during his 

residence at Florence, and extends to about the 

year 1508, when he went to Rome. The third 

period comprehends the execution of the frescoes 

^d other works in that city, and was spent 



Raman 
School ylQth 
century. 



Raphael, 



42 



THJB RISE AND PROGRESS 



Raphael, 



The first 
period. 



The second 
period. , 



chiefly in the service of Julius II., terminating 
only with the death of the painter in 1520, at 
the early age of thirty-seven. 

Very little is known of the first period of 
his lijfe, but there are several easel pictures, 
chiefly Madonnas, well authenticated as belong- 
ing to this time ; and there is a large altar-piece, 
the * Adoration of the Kings,' much injured, 
painted in tempera in about his twentieth year, 
now in the Berlin Museum, No. 150. Here also 
is a very early * Madonna and Child with Baptist,' 
No. 247a, said to have been painted in 1505, and 
strongly Peruginesque iu character. Two of the 
most beautiful of these early examples of Raphael's 
work are * Lo Sposalizio, or the Marriage of the 
Virgin,' No. 334 in the Brera at Milan, and the 
* Coronation of the Virgin' in the Vatican, No. 
27. The small picture of a * Knight Dreaming,' 
No. 213 in the National Gallery ; the beautiful 
little * St. George and the Dragon,' No. 39 in the 
Hermitage, St. Petersburg ; and the small * Holy 
Family del Cordero,' No. 364 in the Madrid 
Gallery, are also said to belong to this same 
period. Works of a similar character are a * St. 
Michael ' and a ^ St. George,' Nos. 380 and 381 at 
the Louvre. 

A new era in Raphael's career began in 1504, 
when he visited Florence and threw off the con- 
ventionalities of Perugino's school. After a short 
stay he returned to Perugia, and besides other 
works executed a fresco for the Church of San 



OF PAINTING IN ITALY. 43 

Severo there, which is, although in an injured 
state, still to be seen in an adjoining house. The 
keads of the three saints on either side of the 
group of which the figure of Christ is the centre 
ire full of expression and noble character. It is 
interesting to see here how far the pupil had 
ilready surpassed the master, for underneath are 
three saints added by Perugino in 1521, the 
execution of which is greatly inferior to the 
ipper portion of the fresco. On Raphael's return 
X) Florence, where he stayed some years, he 
became intimate with Fra Bartolommeo, who had 
hen resumed his profession. Michael Angejo's 
jreat cartoon, the * Pisan Soldiers Bathing,* also 
appeared about this time, and while imder the 
Jifluence of these masters his second style was 
leveloped. Raphael during this time produced 
the celebrated * Entombment* in the Borghese 
Palace ; the * Vierge au Chardonneret,* No. 1129 
^ the Tribime of the Uffizi at Florence; the 
Belle Jardiniere,' No. 375 in the Louvre ; the 
Crarvagh Madonna,' No. 744, and the 'St. 
Catharine,' No. 168, in the National Gallery ; the 
Madonna del Baldacchino,' No. 165, and the 
Madonna del Gran Duca,' No. 266, in the Pitti 
jrallery at Florence ; the * Madonna a la Verdure,' 
^0. 55, Salle III. V^ etage in the Belvedere, 
i^ienna ; and lastly the * Madonna della Tenda,' 
^0. 547 in the Munich Gallery. All of these 
^orks belong to Raphael's second or Florentine 
tyle. 



44 



THE RISE AND PS00RE88 



During the year 1508 he was called to Koiflo 
by Pope Julius II. to decorate the state apartf 
ments of the Vatican, and here commences the 
third stage of the master's history, when he 
painted in what is generally termed his Boman 
style. During the whole period of his residence 
in Bome, till his death in 1520, he was occupied 
on this important work, and it was during the 
execution of this that he attained possession of 
his greatest power. The principal frescoes then 
painted in the Vatican are the * Theology,* some- 
times known as the *Disputa del Sacramento;' 
* Poetry,' or the * Parnassus ;' and * Philosophy,* 
or the ' School of Athens ' — all of which are in the 
Stanza della Segnatura. The largest fresco in 
the second stanza, from which it takes its name, 
is the * Expulsion of Heliodorus from the Temple 
of Jerusalem.' The third stanza contains the 
*Incendio del Borgo;' but the fourth stanza^ 
known as the Sala di Costantino, did not receive 
its decoration until after Baphael's death, when it 
was executed from his drawings by his best pupil, 
Giulio Bomano. This, however, is not absolutely 
correct, since one single figure was painted by 
Baphael's own hand, and stands out at this day in 
its warmth of colour and modelling pre-eminent 
over all the rest. Besides the frescoes of the 
stanze, Baphael was also employed on two other 
works for the Vatican — namely, the decoration of 
the Loggia and the designs for the ten tapestries 
of the Sistine Chapel, seven of the cartoons for 



OF PAINTING IN ITALY, 45 

which are now preserved in the South Kensington 
Museum, London. Very few of the paintings in 
the Loggia were done by Baphael himself; but 
he furnished the designs to be carried out by 
Giulio Bomano and his assistants. Baphael also 
executed the charming frescoes of the * Sibyls ' 
in S. Maria della Pace while at Bome. Many 
Df Baphael's most beautiful oil-paintings belong 
\o this latest period : among the earliest of these, 
iccording to Passayant, is the famous 'Virgin, 
Dhild, and St. John,' known as the 'Maison 
I'Albe,' No. 38 in the Hermitage, St. Peters- 
3urg ; later works are the * Madonna di Foligno ' 
in the Vatican ; the * Madoima della Sedia,' 
N'o. 79 in the Pitti at Florence; the *St. 
Cecilia,* No. 152 in the Bologna Gallery ; the 
Madonna di San Sisto,' No. 67 in the Dresden 
Ballery ; * Lo Spasimo di Sicilia,' No. 366 ; the 
'Madonna del Pesce,' No. 365, the 'Madonna 
iel Lagarto,' No. 371, the v«ry beautiful ' Ma- 
donna della Bosa,' No. 370, and the * Holy 
Family, La Perla,' No. 369, ail at Madrid. Be- 
sides tiiese are the ' Archangel Michael,' No. 382, 
and the ' Holy Family of Francis I.,' No. 377, 
both in the Louvre at Paris ; and, lastly, the 
' Transfiguration,' which he did not live to com- 
pletely finish, now preserved in the Vatican. 

Baphael, besides these numerous works, exe- 
cuted many fine portraits. The most celebrated 
)f these are the so-called *Maddalena Doni,' 
S"©. 1120 in the Tribune of the Ufflzi ; the two 



46 



THE RISE AND PHOGRESS 



Gitilto 
JRomano. 



portraits in one frame in the Doria Gallery at 
liome; those of Pope Julius II., No. 151 in the 
Pitti at Florence, of Pope Leo X., No. 63, of 
Tommaso Inghirami, No. 171, and others there, all 
admirable examples. No less worthy to be noted 
also are the two portraits in the Louvre, Nos. 
383 and 386. 

A magnificent female head, warm in colouring; 
exquisite in finish, and occupying a choice position 
in the Tribune of the UfBzi, No. 1123, has long 
been attributed to Raphael, and is so classed in 
the catalogue. But the authorship has also long 
been contested by many, and the honour has been 
awarded to Sebastiano del Piombo. Finer work 
in any case it is scarcely possible to examine. 

It should also be remembered that, in addition 
to Kaphael's other engagements, he was appointed 
successor to Bramante as architect of St. Peter's ; 
and while thus overwhelmed by his manifold 
labours he died of fever after a few days* illness, 
and was buried with great magnificence in the 
Pantheon at Rome. 

Giulio Romano ought to be mentioned here as 
beiijg the most important of Raphael's followers 
and scholars, and as having assisted him much 
during the later and busier part of his life. His 
principal works in oil are two altar-pieces, one 
representing the ' Martyrdom of St. Stephen ' in 
the church dedicated to that saint at Genoa, and 
the other, a *Holy Family,' in the Dresden 
Gallery, No. 82. There is a * Virgin and GhUd; 



OF PAINTING IN ITALT, 



47 



No. 1154, in the Uffizi, Florence. The * Infancy 
of Jupiter,' No. 624 in our National Gallery, is the 
only example to be noted there. Two important 
compositions are Nos. 293 and 295 in the Louvre. 
Three works exist in the Hermitage, St. Peters- 
burg, of which No. 43, a copy of the * Lagarto' of 
Raphael at Madrid, is the best. Some four years 
after Eaphael's death Giulio Eomano was intrusted 
with the design and decoration of the Duke of 
Mantua's residence, the Palazzo del Tfe at Mantua, 
where many of his frescoes yet remain. In the 
paintings which adorn the room known as the 
Camera di Psyche, Giulio's qualities as an artist 
are seen to the best advantage. The Ducal Palace 
at Mantua also contains frescoes by him. 

During and after the time of Giulio Romano 
many less important scholars worked more or 
less successfully in the style of Raphael. It 
is unnecessary to do more than briefly mention 
a few. 

Innocenzio da Imola copied the master closely. 
Examples may be seen at Bologna and elsewhere. 

Giovanni Francesco Penni was another, whose 
close imitations are not unfrequently met with in 
European galleries. 

Francesco Primaticcio designed Raphaelesque 
bas-reliefs for the Ducal Palace, Mantua, and 
executed frescoes there and in France. 

Raphael's influence, however, was not confined 
to the Roman school, but made itself felt in all 
parts of Italy, as, for iastance, among the Ferrat^^^ 



Followers 
of Raphael, 



School of 
FerrarUj 
16th oen- 



48 



THE RISE AND PROGRESS 



Garofalo. 



Dosso Dossi. 



Sienese 

School,16th 

century. 



particularly in the works of the two most im- 
portant painters of that school, Benvenuto Tisio, 
called Garofalo, and Dosso Dossi. Both these 
masters can only be adequately studied at their 
native city of Ferrara. There are several 
examples of the former painter, Garofalo, in the 
Ateneo at Ferrara ; and there is a pleasing work 
in the Galleria Estense at Modena, No. 189 ; a 
good small work, among others, is No. 421 in 
the Louvre; another is No. 43 at Frankfoi-t: 
similar examples are in the Hermitage, St 
Petersburg, Nos. 59, 60, and 61. A large and fine 
' Marriage of Bacchus and Ariadne ' (said to be 
after a design by Eaphael) is No. 142 at Dresden ; 
and some good specimens exist in the National 
Gallery at London, Nos. 81, 170, 642, 671. 

By Dosso Dossi there is a large altar-piece, a 
* Madonna enthroned with Saints and Evange- 
lists,' No. 47, chiefly remarkable for its glowing 
and almost too powerful colouring, in the Ateneo 
at Ferrara. Another important composition, * The 
Fathers of the Church,' is No. 135 at Dresden, 
where several other of his works may be found : 
see catalogue. A good painting, * Christ in the 
House of Simon,' No. 185, is ascribed to him in 
the Brussels Gallery. 

A young Sienese at the end of the fifteenth 
century was educated under Leonardo's influence, 
and manifested remarkable power as a fresco- 
painter at the very commencement of the six- 
teenth century. He went subsequently to Borne, 



OF PAINTING IN ITALY, 



49 



Bazzif or 
Sodoma, 



where his style was greatly modified by the 
works of Baphael. This was Bazzi, or Eazzi, 
called II Sodoma, a native of Siena, who has 
doubtless been somewhat overlooked in conse- 
quence of the fame of his great contemporary. 
Although inferior to Raphael in most points, yet 
it may be almost said that Bazzi was unrivalled 
in the singular beauty and grace of his female 
heads. His principal works are frescoes, two 
beautiful examples of which are in the Villa Far- 
nesina at Eome, representing * Alexander's Mar- 
riage with Eoxana' and the *Wife of Darius 
imploring Mercy of Alexander.' Bazzi was also 
employed by Pope Julius II. in the decorations of 
the Vatican, but few of these works now remain. On 
his return to Siena, Bazzi executed many frescoes 
for the churches there. In the Oratory of Santa 
Caterina in the Church of San Domenico, for 
instance, there is a series representing scenes 
from the life of St. Catharine, which are mar- 
vellous for beauty of expression; and again in 
the Oratory of San Bernardino are an ' Ascension 
of the Virgin' and *Mary in the Temple.' 
Besides these frescoes there is a remarkable * San 
Sebastiano' in the Uffizi Gallery at Florence, 
No. 1279, and a ' Holy Family ' in the Turin 
Gallery, No. 50 ; but easel pictures by the master 
are rare. 

Bazzi had some Sienese scholars and followers, 
but none whom it is necessary to note particularly 
here. 



s 



50 



TEE RISE AND PROGRESS 



Venetian 
School^ 16M 
zentury. 



Giorgne, 



Another school, the Venetian, also received a 
new impulse at this period from the genius of its 
two greatest masters, Giorgione and Titian. 
Giorgione should be considered first, for, although 
born in the same year as his greater contem- 
porary Titian, he died at the early age of thirty- 
four, whereas Titian lived to the great age of 
ninety-nine years. 

Warmth of colour had always been a char- 
acteristic feature of the Venetian school, just as 
beauty of form was the chief element in the 
Koman school, but Giorgione and Titian were 
the first, following Giovanni Bellini, to free them- 
selves from the formality of an earlier age, and to 
combine flexibility of form, grace, and ease with 
richness of colouring. 

Giorgio Barbarelli, called Giorgione, was justly 
most celebrated for his portraits and ideal heads, 
of which there are some beautiful examples in 
the Manfrini Gallery at Venice; while another 
is the master's own portrait, a fine picture, in the 
Munich Gallery, No. 582. Well-authenticated 
pictures by Giorgione are, however, rare, so many 
being assigned to him without sufiScient founda- 
tion. Among the few works generally admitted 
to belong to him the most important are : * The 
Astrologer' in the Manfrini Gallery; a *Holy 
Family,' No. 43, and 'The Concert,' No. 44, 
in the Louvre ; a * Concert ' in the Pitti Palace, 
j No. 185 ; the fine * Jacob greeting Kachel,' No. 
I 218 in the Dresden Gallery ; the ' Three Astro- 



OF PAINTING IN ITALY. 



51 



logers' and a beautiful * Young Man crowned 
with Flowers surprised by a Soldier/ Nos. 57 and 
10, Salle II. Venitiens, 1®' etage in the Belvedere 
at Vienna ; and an * Entombment ' (disputed, how- 
ever) in the Monte di Pieta at Treviso. There 
are also several small pictures, ascribed to him, 
of subjects taken from sacred history in the 
Uffizi at Florence, and a fine altar-piece exists 
in the Duomo Vecchio at Brescia. 

Giorgione's principal scholar was Sebastiano 
del Piombo, but he possessed, owing to the influ- 
ence of Michael Angelo, many of the characteristics 
of the Florentine school. His chief work in the 
Venetian style is an altar-piece in San Giovanni 
Crisostomo at Venice. Sebastiano's largest work, 
the * Raising of Lazarus,' is in the National 
Gallery, No. 1. Michael Angelo is said to have 
assisted in designing it. A composition almost 
equal to the preceding is the famous * Deposi- 
tion,' No. 18 in the Hermitage, St. Petersburg ; 
where also is a fine * Christ bearing the Cross,' 
No. 17. A grander version still of the latter 
subject is No. 2390 at Dresden. Other fine 
works are a *Dead Christ,' No. 237 at Berlin; 
a 'Visitation of the Virgin,' No. 239 at the 
Louvre ; and a ' Martyrdom of St. Agatha,' No. 
179 in the Pitti at Florence. There are also 
several portraits by this master : one of * Cardinal 
Pole,' No, 19 in the Hermitage at St. Peters- 
burg ; a * Man with a Red Cross on his Breast,' 
without a number, and another^ No. 234, at 

£ 2 



Sebastiano 
del Piombo, 



52 



THE niSE AND PBOGBESS 



Berlin; a fine female portrait, No. 22 at the 
Stadel, Frankfort; a female head, No. 24 in 
the National Gallery ; a male portrait, No. 191 
in the Bergamo Gallery; and the exceedingly 
grand portrait of Prince Andrea Doria in the 
Doria Palace at Bome are the finest examples. 

Jacopo Palma, called II Vecchio, should be 
considered before Titian, as having been one of 
the more immediate contemporaries of Giorgione. 
His largest and perhaps grandest work is an 
altar-piece in the Church of S. Maria Formosa 
at Venice, representing * St. Barbara and Saints.' 
An admirable example is in the Accademia at 
Venice, a * St. Peter and three Saints,' No. 593. 
Another fine work is the * Three Graces,' No. 243 
at Dresden, painted by Palma from his own 
daughters, who were so celebrated for their beauty. 
In the same gallery may be seen three of his 
most charming * Holy Families with Saints,' 
Nos. 242, 246, and 255. The Belvedere at 
Vienna contains some excellent works by the 
master : particularly to be noted is a * Visita- 
tion,' No. 2, Salle II. Venit. V^ etage ; a female 
portrait. No. 49, SaUe VII. V^ ^tage ; a portrait of 
his daughter Violante, No. 11 in the same.room^ 
much injured by repainting ; and that of a * Young 
Hero,' No. 10, Salle 1. 1®^ etage. Several examples 
are at Berlin, of which the best is a beautiful 
bust of one of his daughters. No. 197a. In the 
Hermitage, St. Petersburg, are three fine examples, 
Nos. 90, 91, 92. An admirable * Adoration of 



OF PAINTING IN ITALY. 63 



the Shepherds ' is in the Louvre, No. 277. The 
beautiful portrait of a Venetian woman in the 
Sciarra Palace at Eome, long considered to be by 
Titian and stiQ catalogued under his name, has 
been since proved to be a genuine work by Palma. 
Tiziano Vecellio of Cadore (1477-1576) is said 
by Vasari to have been the pupil of Giovanni 
Bellini. It appears that little is known of his 
early history. Probably he received instruction 
both from Giovanni and Gentile, but he cultivated 
close relations with Giorgione and Palma Vec- 
chio, by whom, especially the latter, he was 
much influenced, as the feeling and style of his 
earlier works clearly testify. To this class belong 
a charming * Madonna and Child,' No. 41, Salle 
IL Ital. V^ etage in the Belvedere at Vienna ; a 

* Virgin and Child,* in an architectural recess, 
suggesting the style of Bellini, No. 93 in the 
Hermitage, St. Petersburg ; the exquisite * Vierge 
au Lapin,' and a ' Madonna and Child with 
three Saints,' Nos. 459 and 458 in the Louvre. 
Somewhat similar to these in the Louvre, and 
painted at about the same early period, the be- 
ginning of the sixteenth century, are two * Holy 
Il'amilies with Saints' at Vienna, Nos. 39 and 
64, Salle II. Ital. l*'^ dtage. Titian executed a 
few years later — namely, from 1508-1512 — a 

* Madonna and Child with Saints,' No. 633 in 
the Ufifizi at Florence, and a * Madonna with 
St. Bridget and other Saints,' No. 236 in the 
Madrid Museum, there catalogued under t\ie^^ 



Titian. 



Hia early 
works. 

Sacred 
subjects. 



54 



THE RISE AND PROGRESS 



TiUan. 



The mature 
corks, 

Sacred 
compost- 
ions. 



name of Giorgione. A noble *Holy Family 
with Saints' exists also at Dresden, No. 223, 
The highly-finished portrait of the Doge Mar- 
cello, now in the Vatican, and the celebrated 
representation of *St. Mark enthroned and sur- 
rounded by Saints ' in the Church of S. Maria 
della Salute at Venice, were painted about 1512. 
By far the most beautiful of Titian's early works, 
however, and one of those which has become 
most celebrated, is the * Tribute Money,' No. 222 
in the Dresden Gallery. The exact date of 
its completion is unknown, but it is certain that 
it closely followed those already mentioned. 
Other great examples of his best work, painted 
during the years 1518 to 1523, are, first, 
the * Assumption of the Virgin,' No. 24 in the 
Venetian Academy, perhaps the finest of Titian's 
compositions ; the magnificent * Entombment,* 
No. 465 in the Louvre ; and the two scarcely less 
important works, a * Santa Conversazione ' in the 
Vatican, and the * Presentation of the Virgin in 
the Temple,' No. 487 in the Venetian Academy. 
Somewhat later he executed three grand altar- 
pieces : * St. Peter Martyr,' formerly in the Church 
of SS. Giovanni e Paolo at Venice, but since 
destroyed by fire; the * Martyrdom of San Lorenzo* 
in the Jesuits' Church there, now so darkened as to 
be almost invisible ; and the superb Pesaro altar- 
piece, * Virgin and Child with Saints and Dona- 
tors,' still preserved in the Church of the Frari 
at Venice. Besides these large works there are 



OF PAINTING IN ITALY. 55 



some smaller paintings of the master which 
belong to this period. Such are the *Noli me 
Tangere/ No. 270, and the very lovely group, 

* Madonna and Child with St. Catharine and 
Infant John,' seated in a fine landscape. No. 635, 
both in our National Gallery; and a beautiful 

* Holy Family,' No. 459 in the Louvre at Paris. 
One of the noblest altar-pieces by Titian is that 
in the Church SS. Nazzaro e Celso at Brescia. 
It is in five compartments, the centre one filled 
by the rising Christ, a grandly conceived 
figure, the modelling and painting of which are 
perfect. Two other compartments on the right 
and left contain a fine figure of San Sebastiano 
and Averoldo in armour with his patron-saints. 
In two smaller panels above are half-length 
figures of the Virgin and of the Angel Gabriel. 
This was completed in 1522. A large altar-piece 
by him was painted in 1533 for the Church of 
San Giovanni Elemosinario at Venire, where it is 
still to be seen, although much injured and 
altered. About ten years later he executed the 
ceiling paintings in Santo Spirito at Venice, and 
the same year saw the production of the large 
*Ecce Homo' at Vienna, No. 19, Salle 11. l*'^ 
£tage. The Louvre contains two paintings of a 
later period, the 'Christ at Emmaus,' No. 462, and 
the 'Christ crowned with Thorns,' No. 464. There 
were also some single figures executed during 
the years 1552 to 1563 : the charming * St. Mar- 
garet/ No. 469 at Madrid ; the fine * Bapt\a\. m\ 



56 



THE RISE AND PROGRESS 



the Desert/ No. 366 in the Venetian Academy 
and the * St. Jerome/ No. 75 in the Brera at Milan 
Belonging to the same late period of this grea 
master's life are the two small well-known headi 
of the * Ecce Homo ' and the * Virgin of Grief, 
Nos. 489 and 468 in the Madrid Gallery. There 
also are the large compositions of the * Trinity, 
No. 462, and an allegorical picture, a royal 
commission. No. 470, painted when Titian was 
nearly ninety years of age. The last work or 
which he was occupied when he was cut off by 
the plague in 1576 was the * Pieta/ No. 33 in the 
Venetian Academy. 

Titian's marvellous power as draughtsman and 
colourist, his perception of human beauty, and 
his wonderful technical skill as a painter are best 
seen in his representations of subjects from 
ancient mythology, or in his allegorical compo- 
sitions. Among the earliest of these are two 
paintings entitled respectively the * Sacred and 
Profane Love,' or, as it is now perhaps more 
rightly named, the * Sated and Artless Love' 
(Crowe and Cavalcaselle), and the ' Three Ages/ 
both in the Borghese Palace at Eome, and fine 
examples of Titian's allegorical works. While the 
former is still one of the most magnificent produc- 
tions of the master, the latter is but a splendid 
wreck. The Borghese also possesses one of Titian's 
latest works of this style, called the * Venus and 
Cupid,' an admirable example. 

Two important mythological compositions are 



Titian's 
allegorical 
works and 
mytholo' 
gies. 



OF PAINTING IN ITALY. 57 



in our National Gallery: the grand * Bacchus 
a-nd Ariadne/ No. 35, and a good replica of the 
* Venus and Adonis/ No. 34, the original of which 
was painted for the Farnese Palace at Rome, but 
tas disappeared. Another replica is to be seen 
ia the Madrid Museum, No. 455. The Louvre 
possesses a very beautiful work, the * Jupiter and 
Antiope,* No. 468 ; and there is a charming small 
ov-ctl picture of the same subject in the Pina- 
cothek at Munich, a masterpiece of its kind. No. 
1238. To the same class belongs a * Diana and 
CeOlisto/ No. 17, iSaUe II. V' etage in the Bel- 
^^dere at Vienna. Besides these there are some 
of Titian's finest works at Madrid. The superb 
* Bacchanalia,' No. 450, is painted in his best 
^\ manner ; and the * Feast of Cupids in honour of 
^i ^ enus/ No. 451, is perhaps the finest representa- 
tion of laughing frolicking children in existence, 
^rvellous alike for natural grouping, drawing, 



i' 



0- 



id 
re 



expression, and colour. Moreover the preserva- 
tion is perfect, and the flesh-tints as fresh and 
brilliant as if painted but yesterday. Titian also 
executed numerous studies of the nude female 
figure, usually reclining, and known as Venuses 
and Danaes. The subject was frequently repeated, 
both by Titian himself and by several followers, 
with or without slight alterations. Two of the most 
femous of those by the master are in the Tribune 
of the Uffizi, Nos. 1108 and 1117, exquisite in 
colour and form. Two others are to be seen at 
Madrid, Nos. 459 and 460, where is also a study >^ 



58 



THE RISE AND PROGRESS 



Titian^s 

female 

portraits. 



of a * Danae,' No. 456. A more finished and finer 
representation of the *Danae' is in the Naples 
Museum, Sala di Correggio, No. 5. A fine 
replica, full of lovely colour, is No. 109 at the 
Hermitage, St. Petersburg. A similar work is 
in the Darmstadt Museum, No. 520, but it is 
inferior to the examples at Florence; another 
is in the Dresden Gallery, No. 225; and i^ 
the Belvedere at Vienna another is No. 36, 
Salle II. 1^' etage. 

Titian's powers, like those of other greft^ 
masters of past time, were very varied, and he h.9^ 
rarely been surpassed as a portrait-painter or U 
his ideal heads. Among the most striking c 
these are the female heads usually known b 
catalogues as * Titian's Mistress.' A beautifiJ 
example is in the Louvre, No. 471, which i 
perhaps a portrait of Laura Dianti, and the mai 
holding the mirror that of Alfonso d'Este. ' I 
similar Venetian beauty is in the Dresden Grallery 
No. 229 ; and another is in the UflSzi at Florence 
there catalogued under the name of * Flora,' Nc 
626. Three other examples of the * Bella d 
Tiziano ' may be mentioned : the finest is in th 
Pitti at Florence, No. 18; one is in the Hex 
mitage of St. Petersburg, No. 105 ; and the thir 
is in the Belvedere at Vienna, No. 35, Salle I] 
Venit. V etage. There is a magnificent * Venn 
with Cupids holding a Looking-glass,' No. 99 i 
the Hermitage : it is painted in a large mannc 
with rich impasto, in splendid flesh tint 



OF PAINTING IN ITALY. 59 



relieved from dark crimson velvet, fur, and 
embroideries. The frequently-repeated represen- 
tations of the *Eepentant Magdalen' must also 
be noticed here. That in the Pitti, No. 67, is 
very fine ; so also are others, in the Hermitage of 
St. Petersburg, No. 98, and in the Naples Museum, 
Sala Grande, No. 21, Several portraits, forming 
pictures of superb quality, exist of Titian's 
slaughter Lavinia. She is to be seen at 
l^resden, holding a leaf-fan. No. 230 ; at Berlin, 
folding a basket of fruit. No. 160; and at Madrid 
she is represented as * Salome with the Head of 
John the Baptist,' No. 461. The male portraits 
oy this grand and fertile master are very numerous, 
^ few of the most important therefore can only be 
^numerated. • Portraits of himself at different 
Periods of his life occur at Vienna, No. 48, Salle 
H. Venit. 1^' 6tage ; at Berlin, No. 163 ; and at 
Madrid, No. 477. The gallery at Madrid is ex- 
^mely rich in portraits by Titian, among which 
j-ke celebrated equestrian portrait of Charles V. 
^ armour. No. 457, ranks first, and is rightly 
^lisidered as the grandest in existence. Another 
^vas in the gallery represents the same monarch 
standing with his dog. No. 453 ; and besides these 
there is a truly superb full-length of Philip II., 
No. 454. Several fine portraits are to be found 
ii the Naples Museum : for example, a noble full- 
length of Philip II. of Spain ; one of Paul III. 
alone, and one of the same Pope seated with his 
grandson, in the Sala di Correggio, Othftt^ 



male 
portraits. 



60 



THE RISE AND PROGRESS 



admirable examples of portraiture are those of 
the Duke and Duchess of Urbino in the Ufifixij 
Nos. 605 and 599 ; those of Ippolito de' Medici 
and of Aretino in the Pitti, Nos. 201 and M; 
that of Admiral Mauro, No. 161 at Berlin; 
and that of Isabella d'Este in the Belvedere at 
Vienna, No. 29, Salle II. V6nit. 1^ itage. The 
Louvre possesses a splendid portrait of Francis I^ 
No. 469, 'L'homme au Gant,' No. 473, and ft 
fine portrait group, representing the Marquis dd 
Vasto and his wife, treated allegoricadly, No. 470^ 
Two similar groups are at Vienna, No. 6, Salle t 
Ital. 1^^ etage, and No. 59, Salle II. Venit. I*' etage- 

It should also be remembered that Titian gaV< 
a new importance to landscape by introducing i^ 
very frequently into the backgrounds of hi> 
pictures, not ijierely as an accessory, but evidently 
because he was a true lover of natural scenery, and 
he also often introduced it with poetical intention 

The under-mentioned painters, belonging t( 
the Venetian school, were all more or less in 
fluenced by the works of Giorgione and Titian. 
Bcnifazio, Titian's best scholar was Bonifazio Veneziano 
many of whose works are to be seen at Venice 
His masterpiece, the * Eich Man's Supper,* Nc 
500, is in the Academy there, as also are severs 
pictures of ' Holy Families and Saints ;' two ar 
at Vienna, Nos. 24 and 26, SaUe VIL V' ^tage 
one is at Dresden, No. 262 ; and two are in th 
Louvre, Nos. 82, 83. A good example is at th 
Hermitage, St. Petersburg, No. 109, an * Adoratio 



OF PAINTING IN ITALY, 



61 



of the Shepherds.' One of his most pleasing 
compositions is in the Brera at Milan, No. 363, the 
* Finding of Moses,' beautiful in colour, although 
somewhat defective in drawing ; another fine work 
is the * Adoration of the Magi ' in the Galleria 
Estense, No. 141, at Modena ; and a third is in 
the Church of Santa Maria in Organa at Verona. 

A distinguished contemporary of Falma and 
Titian was Giovanni Antonio Licinio, called Por- 
ienone. His reputation was at first gained 
chiefly as a fresco-painter. There is an altar- 
piece by him in the Venetian Academy, No. 486, 
^lid another good example is No. 490. His 
Well-known composition the * Woman taken in 
Adultery' is in the Berlin Museum, No. 196. 
His works are not numerous, and are mostly still 
^ the cathedrals for which they were painted. A 
* Santa Conversazione,' No. 52, is in the Pitti at 
Florence; a noteworthy example of portraiture 
is No. 116 at the Hermitage, St. Petersburg ; and 
*tt excellent portrait of a * Lady in Mourning ' is 
ii the Dresden Gallery, No. 252. 

Bernardino da Pordenone, doubtfully regarded 
W a brother of the preceding, painted in his 
Dianner. One of his best works is a large 
'Adoration of the Magi,' No. 119 in the 
Hermitage, St. Petersburg. There is also an 
example at Hampton Court, No. 152, catalogued 
tinder the name of the brother (C. and C). 

Andrea Schiavone requires notice among the 
followers of Titian. He painted some good works^ 



G,A. 
Pordenone, 



B. da 
Pordenone. 



Schiavone, 



62 



THE BISE AND PROGRESS 



Lorenzo 
Lotto, 



Moretto, 



of which the * Jupiter and lo/ in a remarkably 
fine landscape, at the Hermitage, No. 121, is a 
striking example. He is represented at Vienna, 
in the Belvedere, by several paintings: among 
them No. 47, Salle I. l^'^ etage, and No. 19, Salle 
VII. 1®"^ etage, may be noted. 

Lorenzo Lotto, who spent most of his life Ib 
Bergamo, for which reason he is sometimes known 
as " Bergamasco," executed some good work to 
the Venetian manner. Two fine altar-pieces, 
* Madonna and Child with Saints,' are in the 
Churches of Santo Spirito and San Bartolommeo 
at Bergamo; an excellent * Madonna and Child 
with Saints ' is No. 47, Salle II. 1^ etage, 9^ 
Vienna ; a picture with two saints is No. 323 ii 
the Berlin Museum, where also are several pot 
traits. Our National Gallery oontains a doubl< 
portrait by him, No. 699 ; an excellent example i 
at the Hermitage, St. Petersburg. No. 115 
another is at the Brera, Milan ; and his own per 
trait is to be seen in the Berlin Museum, No. 320 

Alessandro Bonvicino di Brescia, known as I 
Moretto, the next painter of importance of thi 
school, was not a Venetian by birth, but studies 
first under Titian and subsequently became a fol 
lower of Eaphael. Partly perhaps from com 
bination of these two influences Moretto formed 
style of his own, the characteristics of which ai 
very distinct. Thus we generally find in his work 
that the glowing Venetian colour is exchange 
for a tender silver-grey tone ; while, on the othc 



OF PAINTING IN ITALY. 63 



iDLand, it must be admitted that during a short 
portion of his life his pictures possessed more of 
a golden than silver hue, but these were excep- 
tional. Moretto was chiefly celebrated for his 
altar-pieces, most of which are still preserved in 
Hs native city of Brescia, where alone the 
loaster's works can be adequately studied. There 
are no less than three examples in the Church 
of Santa Maria delle Grazie there, the finest of 
^Wch is a * Madonna and three Saints.' In San 
Nazzaro e Celso there is a good * Coronation of 
the Virgin,' and in Santa Maria dei Miracoli a 
y ^e work, * St. Nicholas presenting Children to 
jj the Virgin.' The Church of San Clemente con- 
tains five compositions by the master, of which 
the most pleasing is the 'Five Virgins,' a 
charming group of beautiful women. Two fine 
tempera paintings by Moretto, the *Fall of 
Simon Magus' and *St. Peter and St. Paul,' 
originally in the Church of San Pietro in 
Oliveto at Brescia, are now temporarily removed 
to a room in the Palazzo Vescovile there. The 
*enaroli Palace also contains a collection of his 
^orks, among which are especially some splendid 
portraits, one of which has been recently acquired 
ky our National Gallery, and is now No. 1025.* 
lastly, in San Giovanni Evangelista may be seen 

• Since writing the above the OoUection Fenaroli has been 
broken np, and Mr. F. Bnrton, the director of our National 
Gftlleiy, secured the fine portrait above named and three fine 
Horonifl referred to hereafter. 



/; 



64 



THE RISE AND PB0GBE88, 



Bomanmo. 



Moroni. 



the frescoes executed by Moretto in competition 
with his so-called rival, a painter also of Brescia, 
II Bomanino. These are not among the best 
productions of Moretto, but their superiority 
cannot for a moment be doubted : those executed 
by Eomanino are in many respects unpleasing, 
as well as defective in quality. Of Moretto's 
works not at Brescia the best are a 'Madonna 
with St. Anthony and St. Sebastian 'in the Stadel 
Institution at Frankfort, No. 25 ; a * Santa Gins- 
tina ' at Vienna, No. 7, Salle II. ; a beautiful 
woman, magnificently painted in his best style, 
called * Faith,' No. 113 in the Hermitage, Si 
Petersburg ; a fine * Judith ' there, No. 112, is 
attributed to him also ; a beautiful * Holy Family 
with St. Anne ' in the Berlin Museum, No. 197 ; 
and a * St. Peter ' and * St. John Baptist,' Nos. 
261 and 267 in the Venetian Academy. 

Girolamo Romani, or II Romanino (1486-1560). 
Not many pictures exist by this painter, but a 
better work than those referred to above may be 
seen in San Francesco at Brescia, a * Virgin en- 
throned with Saints ;' three examples exist at 
Berlin, Nos. 151, 155, and 157 ; and there is a 
large altar-piece by him in the National Gallery, 
No. 297. One of his finest productions is ati 
altar-piece now in the Museo Civico at Padua. 

Giovanni Battista Moroni was the pupil of 
II Moretto, and was without doubt the greatest 
portrait-painter of his time excepting Titian. 
JEis portraits are very numerous, particularly 



OF PAINTING IN ITALY. 



65 



t Florence : in the Uffizi, Nos. 586, 629, and 
42 are very fine examples. The National 
allery possesses several excellent examples — 
iz. the portrait of a nobleman, No. 1022 ; one 
^ an Italian ecclesiastic. No. 1024 ; that of a 
Lwyer, No. 742 ; that of a tailor. No. 697 ; and 
f a lady, No. 1023. Moroni is also well repre- 
mted in the Accademia Carrara at Bergamo by 
5veral admirable portraits, among which is the 
ead of a child. No. 144, most delicately 
mdered. Another fine example is No. 27 at 
rankfort; in the Hermitage there is a good 
lale portrait, No. 154 ; and his own portrait is 
1 the Museum at Berlin, No. 193, among 
jveral others. He was less successful in his 
Itar-pieces, which are rare: fair specimens are 
I the Brera at Milan, Nos. 123 and 309, besides 
well-painted male portrait, No. 367. 

Martino da Udine, or Pellegrino da San Daniele, 
ae of the most important of the Friulian 
ainters, was a pupil of Giovanni Bellini. He 
i represented in our National Gallery by a 
Madonna and Child Enthroned,' No. 778. 

The last but not least of these followers of 
oliorgione and Titian was Paris Bordone, dis- 
tinguished alike as an historical and as a portrait 
painter. Of his larger works the most celebrated 
are the * Fisherman presenting the Eing of St. 
Mark to the Doge of Venice' in the Venetian 
Academy, No. 492 ; the picture of the * Tibur- 
tine Sibyl/ No. 428, also there; a good a\\at- 



Pellegrino. 



Parts 
Bordone. 



\ 



66 



THE BISE AND PB0QBE88 



Tintoretto. 



piece, No. 191 at Berlin ; and a * Madonna and 
Saints,' a group of Venetian beauties, at the 
Hermitage, St, Petersburg. Several of Bor- 
done*s female portraits are to be Been in the 
galleries of Berlin, St. Petersburg, Munich, 
Vienna, and Florence. The National Gallery con- 
tains two good examples of the master's work ia 
the portrait of a Genoese lady and the * Daphni» 
andChloe,' Nos. 674 and ,637 ; and in the Louvra 
there is a fine male portrait. No. 89. 

These then are the most important painter* 
of the Venetian school who flourished in th^ 
beginning and middle of the sixteenth century* 
Towards the end of the century, when the other* 
principal schools of painting in Italy had already 
fallen into decay, that of Venice still flourished, 
its reputation being maintained by the two great 
masters of that time, Tintoretto and Paul Veronese. 

Jacopo Eobusti (1512-1594), called Tintoretto 
from his father's occupation, that of a dyer, 
studied first under Titian, but subsequently 
followed Michael Angelo, desiring, as he bimseK 
expressed it, to unite the colour of Titian with 
the drawing of Michael Angelo. Tintoretto was 
ft remarkably rapid and for some time careful 
painter, but, owing to the great demand upon 
him for decorative paintings of large size, his 
later works show much of merely mechanical 
treatment and are wanting in originality. The 
most important of his earliest and finest works 
are two oil-pictures : the * Miracle of St. Mark,' 



OF PAINTING IN ITALY, 67 

No. 45 in the Venetian Academy; and the 
* Marriage at Cana ' in the Church of Santa Maria 
della Salute at Venice. There are also some 
other paintings on a smaller scale which ought 
to be classed with the best efforts of the master 
•^namely, the * Vulcan, Venus, and Cupid' in 
the Pitti Palace at Florence, No. 3 ; an altar- 
piece, * Madonna and Saints,' in Santi Giovanni 
6 Paolo at Venice; a spirited battle-piece. No. 
til, and a * Baptism of Christ,' No. 413, in the 
Madrid Gallery; a * Virgin and Child enthroned 
^th Saints,' No. 287 at Dresden; a * Madonna 
^ Glory,' No. 300 at Berlin; a magnificent 
We-size * Andromeda,' No. 135, a * Birth of John 
^^ Baptist,' No. 132, among others, at the 
Hermitage, St. Petersburg ; and a * St. George 
and the Dragon' in the National Gallery, No. 16. 
^^ a later period belong the numerous paintings 
^ Urge size which adorn the Ducal Palace and 
the Scuola di San Eocco at Venice : the celebrated 
* Paradise ' belongs to the former, and the * Cruci- 
feion ' forms part of the collection at the Scuola. 
Tintoretto's reputation appears in great part to 
oe due to these enormous pictures, but we still 
venture to think that his finest productions are 
the less popular works already referred to. An 
admirable specimen of decorative painting is 
'Luna and the Hours/ No. 310 at Berlin. There 
is a study for the * Paradise' in the Madrid 
tfuseum. No. 428; and another exists in the 
Hermitage, No. 133. He also executed man.^ V 

¥ 2 



68 



THE BISE AND PROGBESS 



Paul 
Veronese. 



admirable portraits, examples of which exist in 
most European galleries, and may be found in 
the catalogues at the end of this volume. 

The second of these two Venetian masters 
was Paolo Caliari (1528-1588), called Veronese. 
The characteristic features of Veronese's paint- 
ings are the brilliancy yet perfect harmony of 
his colours, the excellent grouping of numerous 
figures in the foreground, and the advantageous 
use of fine architectural backgroimds. As this 
style of composition is particularly adapted to 
the representation of subjects of a festive nature^ 
so one of Paolo's finest and most successfuL 
works is the ' Marriage at Cana ' in the Louvre^ 
No. 103. In this grand work, and in the perhaps 
scarcely inferior 'Feast of the Levite' in the 
Venetian Academy, No. 547, the high qualities 
of Veronese's work are fully displayed. In the 
Louvre also must be noted * Jupiter destroying 
Crime,' No. 107 bis. The National Gallery 
contains two smaller masterpieces in this same 
style — the * Family of Darius at the Feet of 
Alexander,' No. 294, and the * Adoration of the 
Magi,' No* 268, besides the * Consecration of St. 
Nicholas,' No. 26 ; while in the Louvre there 
are two other fine examples^ — the 'Supper at 
Emmaus,' No. 107 (of which there is a repetition 
at Dresden, No. 309), and ' Christ at the Feast 
of Simon,' No. 104. At Madrid ' Jesus and the 
Centurion,' No. 528, is a fine composition, and in 
a different style is a 'Venus and Adonis,' No. 



OF PAINTING Jy ITALY. 69 



526. At Vienna should be noted * Christ enter- 
ing the House of Jairus,' No. 52, Salle I. 1®' 
6tage. At the Hermitage, St. Petersburg, the 
* Repose in Egypt,' No. 140, the well-known 
*Pieta,' No. 145, the ' Marriage of St. Catharine,' 
No. 146, a fine * Mars and Venus,' No. 151, and 
a good portrait, No. 152, illustrate the master. 
M Dresden Paul Veronese's compositions abound: 
among them should be mentioned the following 
large and fine works — ^a ' Virgin and Child en- 
tboned with Saints and Donator,' No. 301 ; an 
* Adoration of the Kings,' No. 299 ; a * Marriage 
at Cana,' No. 300, * Christ on the way to 
Calvary,' No. 302 ; and a * Finding of Moses,' 
No. 304. Some of his most important religious 
paintings are those which represent scenes from 
the life of St. Sebastian in the Church of San 
Sebastiano at Venice, the burial-place of Veronese 
(temporarily removed to the Academy during 
the repair of the church). The fresco of * St. 
Sebastian going to the place of Execution ' is 
J^markable for its dramatic power. To a later 
period belong the numerous mythological paint- 
ings preserved in the Ducal Palace, among 
which are the two well-known works the * Rape 
of Proserpine ' and * Venice crowned by Fame.' 
There are also two fine altar-pieces by Veronese 
at Verona and Brescia: a * Martyrdom of St. 
George ' in San Giorgio Maggiore at Verona, 
and a * Martyrdom of St. Afra' in the church 
dedicated to that saint at Brescia. 



70 



THE BI8E AND PR0GBE88 



Bassano, 



Correggio. 



There was yet another painter belonging to 
this group in the sixteenth century, Jacopo 
Ponte, surnamed II Bassano, who may be con- 
sidered to some extent as the originator in Italy 
of a style of painting now commonly characterised 
as " genre." That is to say, he was in the habit 
of executing pictures into which he introduced 
animals and still-life, the basis of the composition 
being often landscape. The pictures of ' Moses and 
the Bush,' No. 593, and the * Family Concert,' No. 
595, both in the Uffizi at Florence, and other works 
in his native town of Bassano, are excellent ex- 
amples of this style. Three pictures are attributed 
to him in the National Gallery, of which No. 277, 
the * Good Samaritan,' is an excellent specimen ; 
while good pictures at Madrid are Nos. 22, 23, 
and 29. At Vienna is a diflferent version of the 
'Good Samaritan,' No. 12, Salle I. 1®^ etage. 
Two fair works are Nos. 301 and 303 at the 
Louvre. Bassano likewise excelled as a portrait- 
painter. There is a fine portrait of an old man 
by him in the Berlin Museum, No. 315 ; which 
also contains one of his best sacred compositions, 
a ' Crucifixion,' No. 324. 

Bassano had four sons, all of whom assisted 
nim in the execution of his works, and, like him, 
devoted themselves to the study of this particular 
manner of painting. 

At the end of the fifteenth century was bom 
Antonio AUegri (1493-1534), called Correggio 
after his native village, one of the most accom- 



OF PAINTING IN ITALY. 71 



plished artists of any time, and who belonged 
to no school. Little is known of his history, but 
he spent a life of labour in his art at Parma, 
having apparently little intercourse with other 
painters. He is considered the great master of 
chiaro-oscuro, the management of which became 
a marked characteristic in the works of his 
followers. His compositions possess the highest 
^inalities in regard of drawing and expression, 
tut exhibit also certain admirable effects of light 
and shade; besides which they are animated 
^th grace and spirit peculiarly his own. Occa- 
sionally, and this is more particularly observable 
^ sacred subjects, these latter qualities are too 
prominent, so that the figure of a Madonna, 
for example, is represented as merely pretty 
^^i affected, and lacks repose and dignity. 
S^me of his earlier works suggest the influence 
of Leonardo da Vinci : for instance, a large altar- 
piece of the * Madonna Enthroned, with St. 
Francis, St. Anthony, St. John, and St. Catha- 
rine,' No. 151, now in the Dresden Gallery ; and 
the * Best after the Flight into Egypt ' in the 
Uffizi at Florence, No. 1118. Parma is rich in 
Correggio's works, and there only can he be 
efficiently studied. Many of his finest are at 
the Pinacoteca there. First and foremost is the 
celebrated altar-piece known as the *San Giro- 
lamo,' No. 351, sometimes from its brilliancy 
spoken of as *I1 Giorno' in contrast with the 
*Notte,' No. 151 at Dresden. This great master- 



Sacred 
subjects. 



72 



THE BI8E AND PR0GBE88 



Correggio. 



piece is perhaps unsurpassed by any work of ^^ 
kind in existence. One of the most lovely e"^^^ 
of his beautiful creations is the prominent fig-^Jre 
in it of the kneeling Magdalen, as she be^^^s 
forward to kiss the hand of the infant Christ* 
Second in importance is the ^Madonna d&l^ 
Scodella/ No. 350, by some esteemed equaUj 
with the preceding work. Next are two pictures 
which exemplify Correggio's close study of natat^ 
even when the subjects are thereby rendered 
painful — viz. the * Descent from the Cross,' No. 
352, and the ' Martyrdom of St. Placido and St. 
Flavia,' No. 353 : in the first of these the fainting 
virgin is delineated with marvellous power. His 
earliest works at Parma are the well-known 
' Amorini,' which occupy recesses round a room 
in the Convent of San Paolo. Subsequently he 
painted the cupola of the Church of San Giovanni 
in fresco, representing the * Ascension of Christ 
with the Apostles.' Later still was executed his 
greatest work of this kind, the * Assumption of 
the Virgin' in the dome of the Cathedral of 
Parma. Besides the qualities already referred 
to which characterise this fresco, his power of 
drawing the figure and especially of foreshorten- 
ing is marvellously displayed: remark, among 
others, the figures of the rising Madonna and of 
the descending archangel. All these frescoes are 
greatly injured by time, but excellent copies by 
Toschi and his pupils exist in the Pinacoteca. 
An admirable study, small and finished, for 



OF PAINTING IN ITALY, 



73 



.be * Assumption ' forms a circular panel, No. 82 
it the Hermitage, St. Petersburg. Correggio's 
^est remaining sacred works are seen at 
Dresden: the celebrated 'Nativity' or *Notte,' 
No. 154; a * Madonna and Child with Saints,' 
known as the * St. Sebastian,' No. 152 ; and an- 
other called ' St. George,' No. 155. There is still 
the fine but not large canvas the * Marriage 
of St. Catharine,' an admirable example, in the 
I^ouvre, No. 27 ; and the beautiful * Madonna 
del Latte,' No. 81, is in the Hermitage, St. 
Petersburg. The small * Magdalen Eeading,' so 
^ell and widely known, the chief of the few small 
pictures belonging to this class, is at the Dresden 
Museum, No. 153 ; another example of the class 
is the ' Holy Family ' of the National Gallery, 
^0. 23 ; others are at Naples, Florence, and 
Munich, some possibly replicas or only copies. 

Mythological subjects naturally afford this 

Blaster ample opportunities of displaying his 

love of grace and beauty. Among his best known 

works are the * Danae,' Koom III. No. 40, at the 

Borghese Palace, Kome ; the * Education of Cupid 

by Venus and Mercury,' No. 10 in the National 

Gallery ; the * Jupiter and Antiope ' in the Salon 

Carre at the Louvre, No. 28; the *Leda' at 

Berlin^ No. 218 ; the * Ganymede ' and the * lo ' 

it Vienna, Nos. 21 and 19, Salle VI. 1®' etage. 

Two portraits only can be referred to, both fine : 
me is at Dresden, No. 156 ; the other at Vienna, 
^o. 10, SaUe VI. 1^"^ ^age. 



Mythohgi- 
cal subjects. 



Portraits, 



74 



THE BI8E AND PB00EE88 



Parme- 
gianino. 



Baroccio, 



Correggio had numerous imitators at the end 
of the sixteenth century, although he had few 
pupils, owing to his quiet life and small reputa- 
tion. Of these the most worthy of mention is 
Francesco Mazzuoli, or Mezzuola, sumamed "D 
Parmegianino." One of his earliest and best 
productions is the * Vision of St. Jerome,' No. 33 
in the National Gallery. There are also a fine 
altar-piece in the Bologna Gallery, known as the 
* Santa Margherita,' No. 116 ; a * Madonna ' in the 
Pitti at Florence, No. 230 ; several portraits in 
the Museum of Naples ; and an important series 
of frescoes in the Church of S. Maria della Steo- 
cata at Parma, where is also the well-known and 
celebrated figure of * Moses breaking the Tables 
of the Law.' Besides these he is represented in 
the Church of San Pietro at Perugia by a charm- 
ing * Madonna and Child.' 

Federigo Baroccio, bom at Urbino in 1528, 
exercised some influence on the Sienese and 
Florentine painters of his time. He was a care- 
ful student of his art, and a better draughtsman 
than colourist. He appears to have taken 
Correggio as a model, and he painted seyeral 
large sacred works. Examples are in the Uflfizi 
at Florence, No. 169, a * Madonna Interceding/ 
and No. 212, the *Noli me Tangere;' in lie 
Vatican, Nos. 35 and 37 ; a large * Crucifixion 
and Saints ' in San Lorenzo at Genoa ; and in otur 
National Gallery a * Madonna,' No. 29. Two 
similar works are at the Hermitage, St. Peters- 



OF PAINTING IN ITALY, 



75 



mrg. Nob. 128, 129 ; where also is a very good 
)ortrait, No. 130. Several are at Dresden, one 
)f the best being a ' Virgin and Child with 
Saints,' No. 87. A good example at the Louvre 
is No. 61, *A Virgin and Child in Glory, with 
Saints.' 



SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

About this period, that is to say towards the 
^ad of the sixteenth and beginning of the seven- 
^nth centuries, when some little reaction ap- 
peared in favour of the older modes of devotional 
Reeling, hitherto somewhat diminished by the first 
effects of the Eeformation, a fresh impulse was 
given to art. This stimulus on the one hand, 
^i that of renewed study of the antique on the 
other, combined, developed a new spirit, which 
strove to escape from the mannerism and want of 
originality which had aflfected the schools of 
painting in Italy during the latter half of the 
sixteenth century. 

At this time two distinct styles were formed. 
There was a class of painters who desired to com- 
bine the qualities and characteristics of the great 
cinquecento masters with a certain study of na- 
ture, and these were distinguished as "Eclectics." 
Another class discarded the traditional teach- 
ing, and professed to study solely from nature, 
rnd these were called " Naturalists." The chief 
Eclectic school originated in Bologna, where it 
lourished for some time under the leadership of 



Eclectics, 



76 



THE RISE AND PROGRESS 



TheCixraccu 
Lodovico, 



Agostino, 



Annibale, 



its founder and head Lodovico Caracci. It is not 
unworthy of note here that he was one of the 
first to ap[)reciate rightly the natural truth and 
beauty which characterised Correggio's works. 
Lodovico established a large academy of painting 
at Bologna, which subsequently obtained a great 
reputation. Although he was more celebrated as 
a teacher than as an artist, yet the Bolognese 
Gallery contains some important works from his 
pencil. Among many others may be mentioned 
a * Madonna with St. Francis and St. Jerome' 
and a 'Birth of St. John the Baptist,' Nos. 42 
and 45. Besides these he executed a series of 
frescoes in the Convent of S. Michele in Bosco, 
Bologna, representing scenes from the lives of S. 
Benedict and S. Cecilia. In this latter work he 
was assisted by his two nephews, Agostino and 
Annibale Caracci. Further may be mentioned 
his * Virgin and Child,' No. 126 at the Louvre, 
and his * Christ bearing the Cross,' No. 165 at 
the Hermitage, St. Petersburg. There is also an 
example in our National Gallery, No. 28. 

The elder of the brothers, Agostino, devoted 
himseK more especially to engraving, and to 
the instruction of the students in the academy. 
There is, however, a fine picture by him in the 
Gallery at Bologna, No. 34, * The Communion of 
St. Jerome.' Of the three Caracci Annibale was 
undoubtedly the greatest painter. His best 
work is said to be the frescoes which adorn the 
walls of the Farnese Palace at Eome. The well- 



OF PAINTING IN ITALY. 77 



known picture of * St. Koch distributing Alms ' 

is No. 452 at Dresden ; where, among others, is 

a fine * Virgin and Child enthroned with Saints,' 

No. 451. Besides these should be named a 

'Madonna and Saints' at Bologna, No. 36; a 

small but pleasing * Last Supper,' No. 38 in the 

Ateneo at Ferrara; a * Christ anointed after 

Death,' No. 166, a 'Dead Christ and Angels,' 

No. 172, and * Christ with the three Marys,' 

No. 174, among others, at the Hermitage. 

The following are in the Louvre : No. 136, the 

* Madonna of the Cherry ;' No. 137, the ' Sleeping 
Christ ;' No. 138, * Appearance of the Virgin to 
St. Luke ;' No. 149, * Diana and Calisto,' a good 
example of landscape; No. 151, the * Fishers;' 
and No. 152, * The Chase ;' with several others. 
In our National Gallery the best are No. 9, 

* St Peter meeting Christ,' and Nos. 25, 56, 88. 
It should be remembered that Annibale Caracci 
was one of the first masters to study landscape 
for its own sake, and to make it an important 
feature of his works. There are also a few genre 
pictures by him in existence : one example may be 
named — viz. *The Greedy Eater' in the Colonna 
Palace at Kome. 

The Caracci had naturally a large number of 
scholars and followers. The most important of 
these were Domenico Zampieri, called Domeni- Domeni- 
chino, and Guido Keni. Domenichino comes ^^*'*®- 
first in order. His masterpiece, * The Communion 
of St. Jerome ' in the Vatican, No. 17, is a grand 



78 



THE RISE AND PROGRESS 



Quido, 



work, and one of the finest productions of 
this school. Another important picture is that 
of a * Martyrdom of St. Agnes ' in the Gallery 
of Bologna, No. 206. Among numerous other 
works there are some important frescoes by 
Domenichino in the church at Grotto Ferrata 
near Kome, representing the history of St. 
Nilus; others of the four Evangelists in S. 
Andrea dellaValle at Rome; and, lastly, those in 
S. Luigi de' Francesi of the life of St. Cecilia. 
Domenichino also executed several oil-pictures, 
such as a half-length figure of *St. John,' of which 
there are several repetitions ; a charming figure of 

* St. Eoch' in the Palazzo Brignoli at Genoa ; the 

* St. Cecilia,' No. 494, and No. 493, a good small 
picture, in the Louvre at Paris ; and * Diana and 
her Nymphs ' in the Borghese Palace, Room V. 
No. 15, at Rome, where there is also a * Sibylla' 
by him. Room IV. No. 2. The landscape holds 
a prominent position in the * Diana' picture. In 
the National Gallery he is represented by four 
small works, of which * St. Jerome and the Angel,' 
No. 85, is the best. 

The most gifted and independent painter of 
this time and school was Guide Reni (1575-1642), 
whose works exhibit much delicacy of execution, 
and a certain type or ideal of beauty founded on 
a study of the antique. Thus a strong resem- 
blance to the famous Niobe may be traced in 
almost all his female heads. Guide's produc- 
tions vary much according to the time of life at 



OF PAINTING IN ITALY. 79 



which they were painted, and may be classified 
under three periods as follows : 

To his earliest period belong the * Crucifixion 
of St. Peter ' in the Vatican, No. 33 ; the * Madonna 
della Pieta/ No. 134, a * Crucifixion,' No. 136, 
and a * Murder of the Innocents,' No. 135, in the 
Bologna Gallery; *Two Saints' at Berlin, No. 
373 ; a * St. Sebastian,' No. 332 in the Louvre ; 
and the * Coronation of the Virgin,* No. 214 in 
our National Gallery. These are distinguished by 
the powerful form of the figures, and by strong 
contrasts of light and shade in the composition. 

To the second period belongs Guido's master- 
piece, the celebrated fresco painted on the ceiling 
of one of the rooms in the Palazzo Eospigliosi at 
Rome, representing * Aurora attended by Phoebus 
and the Hours.' It is a work full of grace and 
life, and distinguished by warm and delicate 
colouring. Besides the * Aurora,* and executed 
at about the same time, may be mentioned the 
well-known portrait of Beatrice Cenci in the 
Barberini Palace, Eome ; the • Nessus and De- 
janira,' No. 337 in the Louvre ; ' The Nativity,' 
an altar-piece in the Church of San Martino at 
Naples; and three frescoes, one in the Capella 
S. Silvia, another in the Capella S. Andrea at 
Rome, and a third in San Domenico at Bologna. 
Very lovejy works, and in his best style, are 
* St. Joseph and Infant Christ,' No. 184, and the 
'Madonna with St. Francis,' No. 185, at the 
Hennitage, St. Petersburg. There also are kis 



Early 
period. 



Second 
period. 



\ 



80 



THE RISE AND PROGRESS 



Third 
period. 



Smaller 
works. 



Albani. 



famous * Dispute of the Fathers/ No. 187, a noble 
composition; the * Virgin and eight Young 
Maidens/ No. 191 ; and several others. 

During the third period Guide's colouring 
became more cold, and at last his figures lacked 
their former character, expression, and grace. 
The 'Assumption of the Virgin,' No. 141 in the 
Bologna Gallery, is a grand work, and certainly 
by far the best of this time. Examples of the 
third period may generally be identified by the 
defects named, and need not be cited here. No 
doubt many inferior works which are ascribed to 
the master's third period are really the produc- 
tions of his numerous followers. 

Among Guide's smaller works, chiefly single 
figures, may be mentioned a finely-conceived 

* Crucified Christ' in the Galleria Estense at 
Modena, No. 149; a magnificent * Venus and 
Cupid' in the Dresden Gallery, No. 470; the 

* Cleopatra ' in the Pitti at Florence, No. 178 ; a 

* Magdalen/ No. 329 in the Louvre; a similar 
representation. No. 177 in our National Gallery ; 
and two admirable works in the Dulwich Gallery, 
a * St. John in the Wilderness,' No. 331, and a 

* St. Sebastian/ No. 339. A fine single head oi 
Christ, No. 271, is in our National Gallery ; and 
the Madrid Museum possesses some good works 
of the master, — particularly to be noted are Nos. 
259, 260, 261. 

Another but less important master of the Ca- 
racci school was Francesco Albani, whose nume- 



OF PAINTING IN ITALY. 81 



rous allegorical oil-paintings display much same- 
ness of treatment, although they are remarkable 
for the landscape. Good examples of these are 
Nos. 11 to 14, Eoom V., in the Borghese Palace 
at Eome, representing the * Four Seasons ;' and in 
the Turin Gallery representing the ' Four Ele- 
laents,' Nos. 260, 264, 271, 274. Of his larger 
works on sacred subjects the best are an * Annun- 
ciation ' in San Bartolommeo at Bologna, and a 
* Baptism of Christ' in the Pinacoteca there. 
No. 2. There is another excellent * Baptism,' 
No. 203 in the Hermitage, St. Petersburg; 
where also is a fine example, * Europa and the 
Bull,* No. 204. Several of his works are at 
Dresden : among the best are Nos. 494, 495, 497, 
and 500. Several also are in the Louvre, of 
which Nos. 11 and 12 may be referred to as 
good examples. 

Albani had several scholars: among others, 
Andrea Sacchi the Eoman, one of the best masters Andrea 
of that school. His works are remarkable for ^^^^** 
breadth and simplicity of treatment. His best 
work by far is in the Vatican, * San Eomualdo 
and his Brethren,' No. 36. Towards the middle 
of the seventeenth century he had one pupil of 
some importance. Carlo Maratta, whose drawing Maratta, 
was excellent : otherwise his art was not of a high 
order, and his work often displayed mannerism 
and affectation. During the latter half of the 
seventeenth century he was painter to the Papal 
Court, and painted numerous Madonnas, chiefly 



82 



THE BI8E AND PROGRESS 



in the manner of Guido. There is a work of his, 
No. 71 in the Pitti ; an important composition 
is to be seen at Vienna, No. 1, Salle III. 1^ 
etage ; a good head is in the Corsini Palace at 
Eome ; another is No. 182 in the Suermondt 
Collection at Berlin ; a very fine female portrait 
is No. 257 at the Louvre; and a portrait 
exists in our National Gallery, No. 174. The 
Hermitage, St. Petersburg, possesses many of 
his works, among which may be noted a very 
fine portrait of Pope Clement IX., No. 307, 
and an * Adoration of the Shepherds,' No. 297. 
A fair example is a * Virgin and Child with 
Cherubs,' No. 118 at Dresden; and an * Apollo 
and Daphne,' No. 234 at Brussels. 
Guerdno. Francesco Barbieri, called Guercino, is classi- 
fied also among the Eclectics, although he was 
partly influenced by the Naturalists. Thus his 
works show close adherence to nature, and his 
models were often unpleasing and vulgar. Per- 
haps his best production is the fresco of the 
* Aurora* in the Villa Ludovisi at Eome; but 
his most important oil-picture, a work of gigantic 
proportions, is the * Kaising of the Body of St. 
Petronilla from the Tomb in the presence of her 
betrothed husband Flaccus' in the Museum of 
the Capitol. A large composition also, and 
regarded as one of his best, is an * Assumption of 
the Virgin,' No. 239 in the Hermitage, where 
several other works exist. An important 
example is a subject from the history of Semi- 



OF PAINTING IN ITALY. 



83 



lamis. No. 511 at Dresden. More character- 
istic iUustrations of Guercino's work are the 
'Marriage of St. Catharine' in the Galleria 
Estense at Modena, No. 355 ; and the * Turning 
away of Hagar,' No. 319 in the Brera at Milan : 
both subjects are treated in a commonplace 
manner and lack interest. A small picture, 
regarded as fine, is No. 22 in the National 
Gallery, * Angels weeping over the dead body 
of Christ ;' while the Louvre contains several 
examples of his work — among others, the large 
and fine * Virgin and Child with Patron-Saints 
of Modena,' No. 55 ; the well-known * Circe ' and 
*8t Cecilia,' Nos. 57, 60 ; and a good portrait of 
himself, No. 58. A fine 'Cleopatra' is in the 
Palazzo Brignoli at Genoa, and a good specimen 
is No. 112 at the Brussels Museum. 

The last of the chief pupils of the Caracci Lanfranco. 
^as Giovanni Lanfranco, whose most important 
works are the frescoes in the cupola of S. 
Andrea della Valle at Kome. Most of his com- 
positions show a want of originality, and are 
marked by a cold and spiritless mannerism. A 
'Liberation of St. Peter,' in the Colonna Palace 
at Bome, is one of his more successful oil-pictures. 
Further examples of his work may be seen in the 
Louvre and at Madrid. 

Bartolommeo Schedone followed in part the Schedone. 
school of the Caracci, but was influenced by the 
works of Correggio. His best paintings are in 
the Naples Museum. G-ood examples are in the 

g2 



\ 



84 



THE RISE AND PROGRESS 



Pietroda 
Cortona, 



Tiarini and 
Spada, 



Hermitage, St. Petersburg, among which may be 
mentioned Nos. 271, 272. 

Pietro da Cortona, also of the Boman school, 
must not be left without mention. His best work 
was decorative, in illustration of which it suffices 
to mention that in the Barberini Palace at Rome. 
Two good examples, among others, at the Hermi- 
tage are Nos. 280, 281. Two others, among 
several examples, are Nos. 74 and 77 in the 
Louvre. 

Less important masters of the Bolognese 
school, but who possessed some individual merit, 
were Alessandro Tiarini and Lionello Spada. 
Some of the works of the former are exe- 
cuted in quiet tones and are unusually free 
from the exaggerated expression and forced 
action so prevalent among the painters of the 
time. Good examples of his work are the 
* Repentance of St. Joseph,' No. 416 in the 
Louvre ; the * Marriage of St. Catharine,' No. 
183 in the Bologna Gallery, with several others ; 
an altar-piece in San Petronio there ; and a large 
composition, * San Domenico restoring a Child to 
Life,' in the church dedicated to that saint at 
Bologna. The same chapel contains one of the 
best works of Lionello Spada, a * Burning oi 
Heretical Books by San Domenico.' A good 
example is in the Louvre, No. 408, a * Martyrdom 
of St. Christopher.' 

Later still in the seventeenth century there 
was another painter of note who received some oi 



OF PAINTING IN ITALY. 



85 



Ms inspiration from the Bolognese masters, 
Giovanni Battista Salvi, called Sassoferrato. He Sassofer- 
was nevertheless, by comparison with contem- ^^^^' 
poraries, a painter of some originality, and free 
from the prevailing bias. Some of his best pro- 
ductions are representations of the * Madonna and 
Child,' a subject which he treated in several 
different ways : note, for instance, the * Madonna 
del Bosario ' in Santa Sabina at Eome ; a fine 
* Madonna and Child ' in the Vatican, No. 29 ; 
the same subject, surrounded by cherubs, is No. 
113 at Dresden ; others are Nos. 257 and 259 in 
the Hermitage, St. Petersburg ; and another 
charming example may be seen in the Louvre 
at Paris, No. 372, where is also a fine * Assumption 
of the Virgin,' No. 373 ; while in the Borghese 
Palace at Eome a * Head of the Virgin,' Room 
VL No. 18, and a * Madonna ' in the National 
Gallery, No. 200, should be noted. 

A follower of Guide Eeni's style was Guide 
Cagnacci (1601-1681), some of whose works show 
considerable power. Examples are to be found 
in the Louvre, a * St. John the Baptist,' No. 116 ; 
in the Liechtenstein Gallery at Vienna, a * Jacob 
and Laban,' No. 74, Koom III. ; in the Hermi- 
tage, St. Petersburg, an ' Assumption of St. Mary 
Magdalen,' No. 194 ; a masterpiece in the Acca- 
demia di San Luca at Eome, the ^ Tarquin and 
Lucretia,' No. 25 ; in the Pitti another * Assump- 
tion of the Magdalen,' No. 75 ; and in the Uffizi 
a * Jupiter and Ganymede,' No. 71. 



Ouido 
Cagnacci, 



86 



THE RISE AND PROGRESS 



E, Sirani, 



Eclectic 
Schools of 
Cremona 
and Milan, 



Tlu} Pro- 
caccini. 



Eclectic 
School of 
Rome, 



Eiisabetta Sirani (1638-1663) copied Guido 
closely, particularly his latest manner, and pro- 
duced chiefly weak imitations. Occasionally a 
good small work is met with, of which examples 
are at Vienna, a * Martha and Mary,' No. 34, 
Salle V. 1^ etage ; in the Liechtenstein Gallery 
there, two studies of Cupids, Nos. 339, 342, Eoom 
XL, 2nd Floor ; and in the Hermitage two speci- 
mens, Nos. 199, 200. 

Two or three less important Eclectic schools 
sprang up at the same time as that founded 
by the Caracci : one, for instance, at Cremona, 
under the leadership of Giulio Campi; and 
another at Milan, at whose head were Ercole 
Procaccini (1520-1590) and his sons Camillo 
} and Giulio Cesare, followed by others of the 
I name, and for the most part painting feebly in 
imitation of Correggio. By Camillo a good 
example exists in the Hermitage, St. Petersburg, 
No. 262, a *Holy Family;' where also is a 
* Marriage of St. Catharine,' No. 264, by Giulio 
Cesare. Other examples are at Dresden, for which 
see catalogue. G. Cesare is well represented in 
the Louvre by a * Virgin and Child with Saints,' 
No. 317. 

But a third school had arisen in the sixteenth 
century at Eome under Baroccio, whose influence 
was most felt by two Florentine painters, Ludovico 
Cardi da Cigoli and Cristofano Allori. Both 
these masters show much power in the representa- 
tion of single figures, but their art was limited in 



0¥ PAINTING IN ITALT. 



97 



■ 

legud of compositiaii and design. Some of tlie 

b«t examples of Cigoli's woik aie a * Martyr- ( V'^ 

dam of St. Stephen,' No. 1276 in the Uffizi ; a : 

' St Francis,' No 290, a portrait, No. 30, and an | 

excellent * Ecce Homo,' No. 90, all in the Ktti 

at Florence. Other good works are Nos. 244- 

247 at the Hermitage, St. Petersburg. By Cris- 

to&Qo Allori there is at the Pitti the magnificent '• C. AUori. 

* Judith with the Head of Holofemes,' No. 96, 
one of the finest productions of the time. There is 
a good replica of this No. 248 at the Hermitage : 
inferior copies of it are numerous. In the Uffizi an 

* Adoration of the Kings,' No. 1285, may be noted. 
The Louvre contains an important historical 
work by this master. No. 30, ' Isabella^ of Milan 
interceding with Charles VIII. for her Father.' 

Domenico Feti was a pupil of Cigoli, but A Feti. 
worked afterwards at Home and at Mantua. Some 
excellent works exist at the Hermitage : No. 231, 
a 'David and Goliath,' evidently portraiture; 
No. 235, a * Daedalus and Icarus;' and others. 
Several examples are at Dresden, of which * David 
with the Head of Goliath,' No. 94, is one of the 
best At the Louvre he is well represented by 
the * Melancholy,' No. 193, and others. 

The last painter of merit of the Eclectic school a DM. 
was Carlo Dolci ; and after him the old mannerism 
prevailed, and a period of decadence followed. 
Carlo Dolci's type of beauty is associated with 
features which suggest sentimentality and affec- 
tation, as may be seen in several Magdalens and 



88 



THE RISE AND PROGRESS 



Naturalists, 

The Naples 
School, 



Caravaggio. 



Heads of Saints to be found in foreign galleries. 
His most successful production is *St. Andrew 
praying before his Execution,' No. 270 in the 
Pitti at Florence, where there is also a good 
example of a ' Madonna and Child,' No. 302. A 
* Herodias with Head of John Baptist,' No. 61, 
and a *St. Cecilia,' No. 62, in the Dresden 
Gallery ; a *St. John writing his Gospel,' a strik- 
ing instance of affectation, without a number, in 
the Berlin Museum ; a * St. Catharine,' No. 254, 
and a * St. Cecilia,' No. 255, in the Hermitage, 
St. Petersburg, ought to be mentioned among 
his principal works. 

While the Eclectic school had thus made 
its influence felt in all parts of Italy, its con- 
temporary but antagonistic school, that of the 
Naturalists, flourished principally in the king- 
dom of Naples, where it had taken its rise. 

Michael Angelo Amerighi da Caravaggio was its 
originator, and in his works we see for the first 
time realistic treatment of the subject, with close 
imitation of the model under strong effects of 
brilliant lights and dark shadows, often in powerful 
and animated action; and these were subse- 
quently recognised as the chief characteristics of 
the productions of the school. This style, formed 
as it was from the direct imitation of nature in 
all her aspects, was naturally best suited to the 
representation of domestic scenes, but became 
repulsive when applied to the representation of 
sacred subjects. 



OF PAINTING IN ITALY. 



89 



In Caravaggio's best style are the ' False Card 
Players' in the Sciarra Palace at Eome; the 
* Fortune-teller ' and a portrait of the * Grand 
Master of Malta/ Nos. 33 and 35 in the Louvre 
at Paris ; and the * Two Men Drinking ' in the 
Galleria Estense at Modena, Nos. 205 and 212 — 
all of which subjects are treated in a striking and 
successful manner. A fine work is a * Boy play- 
ing on a Guitar/ No. 217 at the Hermitage, 
St. Petersburg ; so is the * St. Matthew and an 
Angel,' No. 365 in the Berlin Museum. Admir- 
able examples are the * Card-players/ No. 177, 
and a ' Gipsy Fortune-telling,* No. 178, at Dresden. 
A good * Lute-player ' is at the Liechtenstein 
Gallery, Vienna. In a different style, but also 
belonging to his best works, are the * Supper at 
Emmaus,' No. 172 in our National Gallery, the 
* Christ crowned with Thorns,' No. 215 in the 
Hermitage, and a * Pieta,' No. 30 in the Vatican. 
His most important historical works of a sacred 
character are the frescoes representing scenes 
from the life of St. Matthew in San Luigi de' 
Prancesi at Kome. As an example of a subject 
characteristic of this painter, repulsive in matter 
and treatment, but masterly in style, may be 
noted a * Crucifixion of St. Peter/ No. 216 at the 
Hermitage. 

Li the productions of Giuseppe Eibera, called 
" Lo Spagnoletto," a native of Valencia in Spain, 
the characteristic features of the school were still 
more pronounced. His masterpiece is a * Descent 



Rihera, or 
SpagnO' i 
letto. 



90 



THE B18E AND PB00BE88 



Salvator 
Hosa, 



from the Cross ' in San Martino at Naples, where 
there is also another of his best works, an ' Adora- 
tion of the Shepherds;' and a fine boldly-exe- 
cuted * St. Sebastian ' is in the Naples Museum, 
No. 12, Sala di Correggio (see, for further notice, 
Spanish Painters). 

Ribera's principal pupils were Salvator Bosa, 
the landscape painter, and Luca Giordano. The 
former received some of his earliest instructions 
in the school of Aniello Falcone, who was the 
first to make a reputation as a painter of battle- 
pieces. From him doubtless Salvator Eosa 
derived his love of genre painting, but it was 
with his landscapes that his fame as a painter 
has been usually associated. He studied wild 
scenery under strong effects of light and shade, 
and often selected banditti for his figures. One 
of his best is * Mercury and the dishonest Wood- 
man,* No. 84 in the National Gallery ; admirable 
landscapes of this character are Nos. 2413 and 
2414 at Dresden ; two good pictures are No. 360, 
a battle-piece, and No. 361, a landscape, in the 
Louvre, among others ; and the Doria Palace at 
Eome contains several good examples: there 
are others also to be found in the Pitti at 
Florence, Nos. 133, 135, 306, 453, 470 ; in the 
Berlin Museum, Nos. 421, 428a; and in the 
Colonna Palace at Eome. The Hermitage at 
St. Petersburg contains many good works by 
him: among them the * Prodigal,' a life-size 
figure, No. 220 ; a group of figures. No. 223 ; and 



OF PAINTING IN ITALY. 91 



some excellent portraits. Three good examples 
of battle-pieces by the master are in the Bel- 
yedere at Vienna, Nos. 56 and 57, Salle III. 
I*' etage, and No. 12, Salle IV. Eez-de-chauss^e. 
Among his historical compositions the most 
important is the * Conspiracy of Catiline,' No. 
Ill in the Pitti Palace. 

The other pupil of Eibera, the gifted but 
perhaps somewhat careless Luca Giordano,, earned 
for himself the surname of "Fa Presto" from 
his powers of rapid execution. His works are 
very unequal in merit : some are finely conceived 
and painted — as, for instance, a * Massacre of the 
Innocents' in the Munich Gallery, No. 442; 
some large and admirable mythological subjects, 
as a * Judgment of Paris,' No. 441 at Berlin ; a 
replica of this with slight difference. No. 294 at 
the Hermitage; a * Sleeping Bacchus andNymphs,' 
No. 293, and others, in the latter collection also. 
By his hand are a large fresco in the Church de' 
Girolamini at Naples, and some frescoes in San 
Hartino there ; while others decorate the ceiling 
of the Sacristy in the Cathedral at Toledo, Spain. 
Many other such decorative works exist. A 
* Descent from the Cross,' No. 571 in the Aca- 
demy at Venice, a * Madonna and Saints,' No. 
38 in the Sala Grande, Museum at Naples, and 
several examples in the saloon devoted to the 
Neapolitan school there, should be noted. There 
are some fine works by him in the Dresden 
Gallery, while others there show misapplication [ 



Luca 
Giordano. 



92 



THE BISE AND PB0GBE88 



of his high gifts. One of the former is the 
* Hercules and Omphalos/ No. 568. No less than 
sixty-four pictures of varied quality are catalogued 
imder his name in the Madrid Museum; and 
three fair specimens are in the Louvre, Nos. 
206, 207, and 208. 



School of 
Venice, 
ISth cen- 
tury, 

Canaletto, 



EIGHTEENTH CENTURY. 

We have already observed the decline of the 
schools of the Kenaissance throughout Italy, 
and that a somewhat mechanical realism was 
the chief source of inspiration, if such it can be 
called, for the painters of the seventeenth century. 
The development of this tendency led to a new 
and interesting feature in art in the beginning of 
the eighteenth century in Venice, wher^ the 
three masters, Antonio Canale, called Canaletto, 
and his followers, Bernardo Bellotti, a nephew, 
and Francesco Guardi, executed their numerous 
views of the city and her canals. A large number 
of works erroneously attributed to the eldest 
master are to be found in the galleries of Europe, 
but authentic and fine examples are not so often 
met with. One of Canale's finest works is the 
admirable view of the Church of Santa Maria 
della Salute at Venice, No. 113 in the Louvre. 
Others quite as fine are the * Eeception of Count 
Gergi,' No. 318, and its pendant, the * Marriage 
of the Doge with the Adriatic,' No. 319, both in 
the Hermitage, St. Petersburg. Four excellent 



OF PAINTING IN ITALY. 93 

Venetian scenes are Nos. 490, 493, 501, 503 at 
Berlin, Among others at the Stadel, Frankfort, 
No. 35 may be noted. Our National Gallery 
contains some excellent examples of the master, 
Nos. 127, 163, 937, 939, besides others. Twelve 
yiews are in the Naples Museum ; while a charm- 
ing small view of Venice is in the Turin Gallery, 
No. 257 its, and another in the Gallery at Ber- 
gamo, No. 38. Canaletto resided for some time 
in Englsmd, and executed many views in London 
and elsewhere, which are now chiefly in private 
collections. One of Eton College is No. 942 in 
the National Gallery, 

Works by Bellotti, or Bellotto, also called Cana- BeiioUo. 
letto, are generally rare. The Dresden Gallery con- 
tains good examples in great number ; and in the 
Pinacothek at Munich there is an excellent view 
of the old city of Munich, No. 476. Two inter- 
esting but hardly characteristic small landscapes 
by him are Nos. 205 and 206 in the Brera at 
Milan, both simple country scenes. Fine views 
of Turin are Nos. 283 and 288 in the Gallery 
there. A large view of the Kialto, one of his 
very finest works, is No. 320 at the Hermitage, 
St. Petersburg. A good smaller picture is No. 
187 at Berlin. 

Compared with »Canaletto, the works of Guardi GuardL 
are less precise and constrained in line, while 
his colour is more harmonious, and his aerial 
perspective is better than that of the older master. 
Some of his best works are to be found in the 



94 



THE RISE AND PROGRESS 



Louvre: most excellent is the picture of the 
*Doge proceeding in State to the Salute/ No. 
220 ; the ' Doge going in State to St. Zacharias,' 
No. 224 ; and a ' Saloon in the Ducal Palace, 
Venice/ No. 225. A good view of the * Piazza 
of San Marco ' is in our National Gallery, No. 
210 ; and several small but charming Venetian 
scenes are in the Bergamo Gallery. 

One marked exception to the influence of the 
Tiepoh. Naturalistic school was Giovanni Battista Tiepolo, 
whose light and dexterous style was adapted for 
decorative work, and in which he produced some 
showy pleasing pictures. A really fine example 
is to be seen in the Hermitage, the 'Feast of 
Cleopatra,' No. 317. There is a small specimen 
without a number in the Berlin Museum ; besides 
two others, Nos. 454, 459. A single small work, 
at present without a number, represents him in 
the Louvre : it is a ^ Last Supper,' and is in the 
long gallery. 



OF PAINTING IN ITALY, 



95 



A CHEONOLOGICAL TABLE 

Embracino the Dates of Bibth and Death of the Principal 
Paintebs of the various Schools of Italy. 



SchooL 




Birth. 


Death. 


Pisa . . . 


Ginnta Pisaftio .... 


1202 


1258 


Siena . . 


Guido da Siena, dated picture 








1221 


— 


— 




Bonaventura Berlinghieri, 








signed and dated picture 








1235 






Ar^zo • • 


Margaritone d'Arezzo . . 


1236 


1313 


Florentine . 


GaddoGaddi 


1239 


1312 


Florentine . 


Cimabue (Giovanni Gnaltieri) 


1240 






„ Last record 1301-2 






Boman . . 


Pietro Oavallini .... 


1259? 


1344 


Siena . . 


Duccio di Bnoninsegna, 








painted 1282 .... 






Flcnentine . 


Giotto (di Bondone) . . . 


1276 


1336 


Florentine . 


Buffalmacco (Buonamico di 
Oristofano), painted 1302- 








1351? 






Siena . . 


Segna di Buenaventura, 








painted 1305-19 . . . 




— 


Siena . . 


Simone di Martino (Memmi) 


1283 


1344 


Fbrentine . 


TaddeoGaddi 


1300 






„ ,, Last record 1366 
Jacopo di Casentino . . . 


— 


— _ 


Florentine . 


1310 


1390 


Siena . . 


Pietro Ijorenzetti .... 
Ambrogio Lorenzetti, painted 


1317 


1355 




1323-40 




— — 


Siena . . 


Lippo Memmi, painted 1317 




1356 . 


Bolognese . 


Yitale da Bologna, painted 








1320-45 


— 


— i^ 


Florentine . 


Giottino (Tommaso) . . . 


1324 




Florentine . 


Agnolo Gaddi 


1325 


1396 


Padua ^ . 


Justus of Padua .... 


— 


1400 



96 



THE RISE AND PB0GRE88 



SchooL 




Birth. 


Death. 


Arezzo . 


Spinello d' Aretino, abont 


1316 


1408 


Florentine . 


Andrea di Oione, Orcagna, 








painted 1340-75 . . . 




1389 




Puccio Capanna, painted 1349 






Venetian 


GentQe da Fabriano, about . 


1370 


1450 


Modenese 


Tommaso of Modena, painted 








1350-60 




— 


Modenese 


Baruaba of Modena, painted 








1367-80 


"~* 





Bolognese . 


Simone Grocefissi, dated 






picture 1370 


^HBM 


__ 


Bolognese . 


Jacopo Avanzi, painted 1370- 

O V • • • • • • y • • 

Francesco da Volterra, painted 














1370 




1372 


Siena . . . 


Taddeo di Bartolo 


1362 


1422 


Neapolitan . 


Antonio Solario (11 Zingaro). 


1382 


1455 


Venetian 


Jacobello del Fiore, painted 








1400-39 ...... 


1383 




Florentine . 


Masollno 


1440 


Florentine . 


Fra Angelico (Giovanni 








Guido) 


1387 


1455 


Padnan . . 


Francesco Sqnarcione . . 


1394 


1474 


Venetian 


JacoDO Bellini 


1395 
1396 
1402 


1470 ' 


Florentine 


Paolo Uccello 


1479 


Florentine . 


Masaccio 


1429 


Florentine . 


Fra Filippo Lippi .... 


1412 


1469 


Umbrian 


Piero della Francesca, about . 


1415 


1509 


Umbrian 


Benedetto Bonfigli, about 


1420 


1496 


Venetian 


Gentile Bellini .... 


1421 


1507 


Venetian 


Giovanni Vivarini (da Mu- 








ranoj. painted 1440-47 . . 




— 


Venetian 


Antonio Vivarini, painted 








1440-70 




^^^^ 


Venetian 


Bartolommeo Vivarini, painted 






1450-1500 


1424 


■ 


Florentine . 


Benozzo Gozzoli . 




1485 


Venetian 


Giovanni Bellini . . 




1426 


1516 


Florentine . 


Antonio Pollajuolo. 




1433 


1498 


Padnan . . 


Andrea Mantegna . 




1430 


1506 


Ferrarese 


CSosimo Tura 




1430 
1432 


1496 


Florentine . 


Andrea Verrocchio. 




1488? 


Umbrian . 


Giovanni Santi 




1435 


1495 


Florentine . 


Gosimo Bosselli . . 




1439 


1506 



OF PAINTING IN ITALY. 



97 



SchooL 




Birth. 


Death. 


Umbrian 


Melozzo da Forii, about . . 


1438 


1494 


Umbrian 


Niocolo Alunno (di Foligno), 








painted 1458-99. . . . 


— 




Yeronese 


Domenico Morone of Verona 


1442 






„ Last record 1503 . 


— ^ 




Florentine . 


Piero di Cosimo .... 


1441 


1521 


Florentine . 


Luca Sio:norelli .... 


1441 


1521 


Venetian 


Luigi Yivarini, painted 1464- 








1503 


_— 


__ 


Venetian 


Antonello da Messina, painted 








1465-95? 


-^ 




Umbrian 


Pemgino (Pietro di Vannuoci) 


1446 


1524 


Florentine . 


Sandro Botticelli .... 


1447 


1515 


Florentine . 


Domenico Gbirlandfljo 


1449 


149& 


Bolognese . 


Marco Zoppo, painted 1471-98 


-^ 




Umbrian 


Fiorenzo di Lorenzo, painted 








1472-87 






Bolognese . 


Francesco Francia . . * 


1450 


1517 


Venetian 


Vittore Garpaccio, about . ^ 


1450 


1520 


Veronese 


Liberale da Verona . . . 


1451 


1536 


Lombard 


Leonardo da Vinci . . . 


1452 


1519 


Umbrian 


Pinturiccbio (Bernardino di 








Betto) 


1454 


1513 


Vicenza . . 


Francesco Bonsignori . . . 


1455 


1520 


Viceiiza • . 


Bartolommeo Montagna, pain- 








ted 1480 




1523 


Lombard 


Ambrogio Borgognone, about 


1455 


1525 


Lombard 


Andrea da Solario, about . . 


1458 


1530 


Florentine . 


Lorenzo di Gredi .... 


1459 


1587 


Lombard 


Bernardino Luini, about . . 


1460 


1530 


Bolognese . 


Lorenzo Costa 


1460 


1535 


Florentine . 


Filippino Lippi .... 


1460 


1505 


Florentine . 


Baffiiellino del Garbo . . . 


1466 


1524 


Lombard 


Giovanni Antonio Beltraffio . 


1467 


1A16 


Umbrian . . 


L'Ingegno (Andrea Luigi) . 
Cima da GonegUano, painted 


1470 


1556 


Venetian 








1489-1517 


-^ 


~— 


Venetian 


Carlo Crivelli, about • . . 


1468 


1587 


Florentine . 


Fra Bartolommeo<Baoeio deUa 








Port^ 


1469 


1517 


Veronese 


Giovanni Caroto .... 


1470 


1546 


Florentine . 


Giuliano Bugiaidini « • ^ 


1471 


1554 


Vezonese 


Francesco Morone .... 


1473 


1529 r 


Florentine . 


Hariotto AlbertinelH . . . 


1474 


1515 



98 



THE RISE AND PROGRESS 



SchooL 




Birth. 


Death. 


Veronese 


Girolamo dai Libri . . . 


1474f 


1556 


Ferrarese 


Dosso Dossi, about . . . 


1474 


15.58 


Florentine . 


Michael Angelo (Buonarroti). 


1475 


1564 


Venetian 


Jacopo Palma, 11 Vecchio. . 


1475 


1528 


Venetian 


Tiziano Vecellio .... 


1477 


1576 


Venetian 


Giorgio Barbarelli, Giorgioue. 


1477 


1511 


Sienese . . 


Bazzi (11 Sodoma) .... 


1477 


1549 


Florentine . 


Francesco Granacci . . . 


1477 


1543 


Lombard. .. 


Gesare da Sesto .... 


1480 


1521 


Bergamo. . 


Lorenzo Lotto 


1480 


1558 


Ferrarese 


Benvenuto Tisio, 11 Garofalo. 


1481 


1559 


Boman . . 


Baphael Sanzio .... 


1483 


1520 


Venetian 


Giovanni Antonio Licinio, 








Pordenone 


1483 


1539 


Lombard 


Gandenzio Ferrari . . . 


1484 


1549 


Venetian 


Sebastiano del Piombo . . 


1485 


1547 


Veronese 


Paolo Morandi (Cavazzola) . 


1486 


1522 


Bresoian 


Girolamo Bomanino . 


1486 


1560 


Florentine . 


Andrea Vannucchi del Sarto 


1488 


1530 


Boman . 


Giov. Francesco Penni . . 


1488 


1528 


Boman . . 


Francesco Primaticcio . . 


1490 


1570 


Boman . 


Innocenzio da Imola . . . 


1490 


1549 


Boman . . 


Giulio Bomano or Pippi, about 


1492 


1556 


Parma . . 


Antonio AUegri, Gorreggio . 


1493 


1534 


Florentine . 


Jacopo Pontormo .... 


1494 


1556 


Venetian 


Bonifazio Veneziano . . . 


1494 


1563 


Bresoian 


Alcssandro Bonvicino, 11 








Moretto 


1500 


1547 


Venetian 


Paris Bordone 


1500 


1576 


Gremonese . 


Giulio Gampi 


1500 


1572 


Florentine . 


Bronzino 


1502 


1572 


Parma . 


Parmigianino (Francesco 








Mazzuoli) 


1504 


1540 


Umbrian 


Lo Spagna (Giovanni diPietro) 
— first record 1507; last 








record 1528 




^^^ 


Lombard. . 


Bernardino Lanini . . . 


1508 


1578 


Florentine . 


Daniele da Volterra . . . 


1509 


1566 


Bergamo 


Giovanni Battista Moroni 


1510 


1578 


Venetian 


Jacopo da Ponte, 11 Bassano. 


1510 


1592 


Venetian 


Marco Belli, painted 1511 . 






Venetian 


Jacopo Bobusti, Tl Tintoretto 


1512 


1594 


Florentine • 


Giorgio Vaaari .... 


1512 


1574 


Venetian 


Bernardino da Pordenone 


1520 


1570 



OF PAIHTINe IN ITALY. 



SoUooL 




B^ni,. 


D-tb. 


Lombard . 


Ereola Procaccini .... 


1520 


1590 


YenetiHti 


Andrea SchiaTOae . . . 


1522 


1582 


Venetian . 


■paolo Cftliari, Veronert . . 


1528 


1588 


Roman , . 


Fe<]erieo Darocci oi Baroooio 


1.^23 


1612 


Florentine , 


Aletsandro AUori 


1535 


1607 


Bolopiese . 


Lodovioo Caracci . . . 


1555 


1619 


Venetian 


Jacupo Palma. 11 GioTane . 


1544 


1628 


Lomburd . 


tlnmillo Procftpeini . . . 


1546 


162G 


Lombnrd 


Giulio Gesare Procaccioi . . 


1548 


1626 




Ag08tino Camcci . . . 


1558 


1601 


Lombiird . 


GJovaoni Baltista Creapi. . 


1557 


1633 


Floreotina . 


Lndovico Carrii da Cigoli . 


1559 


1613 


Eoiognese , 


Annibale Caracci .... 


15fiO 


1609 


Florentine . 


Francesco Vatini . . . . 


15<J3 


1609 


Boman . . 


Cewre D'Arpioo .... 


1567 


1640 


Neapolitan . 


Miohnel An^lo Ameriglil da 








Caravaggia 


1569 


1609 


BolngneBB . 


GuidoEeni 


1575 


1642 


Bologneae . 


Lionello Spada . . . . 


1376 


1622 




CristpfanoAllori . . . . 


1577 


1621 






1577 


IGliS 


BolognBse ! 


Pranceseo Alliaoi . . . . 


1578 


1660 




llatteo RosBelli . . . . 


1578 


1650 




B«ttolomnieo Behedono . . 


1580 


1615 


BologoeBO . 


DoiDenico2anipieri, Domeni- 








chiQO 


1581 


1641 




Giovanni Lanfranco . . . 


1581 


1647 


Florentine . 


Domenioo Feti 


1589 


1624 


BdIobubso . 


Giovanni da San Giotanni . 


1590 


I63S 


BologneBO . 


FraticeHco Barbieri, Gueroino 


1590 


166G 












yanino 


1590 


16.W 


Neapolitan . 


AniellD Falcone . . . . 


1594 


1665 


Bonan . . 


Pietm da Corlona . . , . 


159S 


1669 


Roman . . 


Andrea ."aoohi . . . . 


1593 


1661 


Bnlngn^se . 


Guide Cagnaoci . . . . 


ItiOl 


1631 


Bolognesa . 


Giovanni Battisla Salvl, Sbsso 








forrato 


1G05 


1685 


Boli^eae . 


8. Cantarini 


1612 


1648 


Eiiman . . 


Ptetro Francesco Mola . . 


1612 


1668 


Nf-apolitan . 
Florentine . 


Salvator Rosa 


1615 


1673 


Carlo Doici 


1616 


1636 


Boman . . 


Carlo Maratta 


1635 


1713 




Lucu Giordano, Fa Presto . 


1632 


1705 



100 



THE BI8E AND PB00BE88 



School. 




Birth. 


Death. 


Bolognese . 


Elisabetta Sirani .... 


1638 


1665 


Venetian 


Bebastiano Rioci .... 


1662 


1734 


Venetian 


GioY. Battista Tiepolo . . 


1692 


1769 


Venetian 


Antonio Ganale, Oanaletto • 


1697 


1768 


Venetian 


Francesco Zuocberelli . . 


1702 


1788 


Venetian 


Francesco Guardi . . . 


1712 


1793 


Venetian 


Bernardo Bellotto. • . • 


1720 


1780 



OF PAINTING IN FLANDERS. 



101 



THE RISE AND PROGRESS OF PAINTING IN 

FLANDERS. 

Some records of Flemish painters dating as early 
as the fourteenth century have come down to 
our time, principally in the chronicles of the 
different guilds or companies to which they 
belonged. Few dates relative to these early 
painters can be depended on before the sixteenth 
century; still, owing to the fact that the best 
of them were appointed to official posts by their 
respective patrons, some historical data have 
been obtained. The first painter known to hold 
such a post was Jean van d'Asselt, who entered 
the service of Count Louis de Male in 1365, and 
continued in it until 1381. During this period 
he is said to have assisted in the decoration of a 
chapel in Notre Dame de Courtrai, which was 
intended by the Count as a mausoleum for him- 
self and his successors ; and that he executed 
there some of the portraits of the Count's prede- 
cessors. In 1386 he appears to have received an 
order from the Cordeliers of Ghent for an altar- 
piece, which is the last known date relating to him. 
Philip the Hardy, Duke of Burgundy and 
the next Count of Flanders, had two official 
painters attached to his court — ^viz. Jean Malwel 



Fourteenth 
century. 



Van 
cTAsseft, 



102 



THE RISE AND PB0GRES8 



Maiwel, 



Broeder- 
lam. 



JTtibert van 
Eyck. 



Fifteenth 
century. 



and Melchior Broederlam. The former of these 
was probably employed in the decoration of the 
Carthusian Monastery at Dijon ; but more is known 
of the Fleming Broederlam, whose fmost impor- 
tant works (in which he was assisted by one 
Jacques de Burse) are the shrine paintings now 
preserved in the Museum at Dijon. Most in- 
teresting are these examples in the history of 
Flemish art, since they exhibit the earliest efforts 
to produce a truthful representation of nature, 
and that minute attention to detail which event- 
ually became a leading characteristic of the work 
of this school. 

In the year 1366 was bom at Maeseyck Hubert 
van Eyck, who made the first great namiB 
in the annals of Netherlandish art, and per- 
haps did more than any other master to ad- 
vance the art of painting in his native land. 
He not only introduced a hitherto imknown mode 
of painting in oil, and improved the existing 
colours, but in the treatment of his subjects he 
formed a style differing from that of his pre- 
decessors, because founded on a close imitation of 
nature, instead of repeating the old conventional 
characters. Hubert's gl^atest production is the 
celebrated * Adoration of the Lamb,' a large altar- 
piece in the Vydts Chapel of the Cathedral of 
St. Bavon at Ghent. With the exception of the 
original wings, in the form of six beautiful tall 
panels, painted on each face, and which are now 
in the Berlin Museum, Nos. 512-23, and the two 



OF PAINTING IN FLANDERS. 103 



outer compartments, which are in the Brussels 
Museum, No. 13, the whole of this grand work 
remains in its original situation. The missing 
portions — which, however, are very important — 
are replaced at Ghent by copies made by Michael 
Coxie. It was begun by Hubert in 1420, but 
upon his death in 1426 Jan van Eyck, his 
younger but not less distinguished brother, and 
also his best pupil, undertook to finish the work, 
and completed it in 1432. Certain it is that this 
was the finest production of the age, both as 
regards composition and colouring; while the 
infinite delicacy of the finish and the careful 
rendering of every detail show the touch of a 
Blaster in his art. Not only are the larger figures 
grandly and broadly painted, although remarkable 
for high finish, but the landscape also, which forms 
a large part of the work, is executed in the most 
admirable manner. A work only inferior to this 
(but smaller in size) is the painting of the 'Fount 
of Salvation,' or rather * Triumph of Christianity,' 
in the Madrid Gallery, No. 2188, the authorship 
of which has been disputed. Passavant and Lubke 
assign it to Hubert, while 0. Miindler and Crowe 
and Cavalcaselle attribute it to Jan. It may be 
a diflScult point to decide, for the Madrid picture 
seems to bear a close resemblance to the ' Adora- 
tion of the Lamb,' in conception, technical treat- 
ment, and colour. The rendering of rich robes 
and sparkling jewels is similar and equally mar- 
relloufi in both pictures. 



104 



THE BISE AND PROGRESS 



Jan van Eyck, who was twenty years younger 
than Hubert, carried his brother's style of work 
to still higher perfection. In such productions 
as the marvellously executed * Virgin enthroned 
with Swnts ' in the Museum at Bruges, No. 1, of 
which the head of the kneeling donator on the 
right is by far the finest portion ; a ' Virgin and 
Child blessing St. Barbara' in the Marquis of 
Exeter's collection at Burleigh ; and the exquisite 
small triptych, a 'Madonna and Child with Saints,' 
at Dresden, No. 1713 — the travelling shrine of 
Charles the Fifth — the varied genius and skill of 
the master are powerfully manifested. In the 
Hermitage at St. Petersburg also there is an 
extremely fine ' Annunciation,' No. 443. A small 
' Madonna and Child,' No. 2, exists in the Suer- 
mondt Collection at Berlin (on which some doubt 
as to authorship is thrown by Messrs. Crowe and 
Cavalcaselle) ; and the well-known and exquisite 
' Madonna del Lucca ' is at the Stadel Gallery, 
Frankfort, No. 59. There are a 'Virgin and 
Child,' not in his best manner. No. 411, and a 
somewhat inferior replica (or copy?) of the Bruges 
picture. No. 412, both in the Museum at Antwerp ; 
where also is a beautiful drawing by him, in the 
finest pencil line, of ' St. Barbara,' No. 410. An 
^ Adoration of the Kings,' not equal to his best 
work, is ascribed to him in the Brussels Gallery, 
No. 14. One of his most important small works 
is in our National Gallery, containing portraits 
of Jean Amolfini and of his wife Jeanne de 



OF PAINTING IN FLANDERS. 105 



Chenany, No. 186, a jewel of workmanship in 
point of finish and minute detail. Another 
example is the 'full-length of * Chancellor Eollin 
and the Virgin ' in the Louvre, No. 162. Other 
beautiful portraits and works of this order exist : 
for instance, the portrait of his wife in the 
Museum at Bruges, No. 2; those of Jodocus 
Vydts, so called, No. 42, and of Jan de Leeuw, 
No. 13, Salle II. 2°** etage, in the Belvedere at 
Vienna ; and a fine life-size * Head of Christ,' No. 
528 at Berlin. Portraits of a man with red 
head-dress and of a mam in a green hood are Nos* 
222 and 290 in our National Gallery. 

It is not surprising that the influence of the 
Van Eycks made itseK felt throughout the 
Netherlands, and that many followed in their 
footsteps, some perhaps as careful imitators, others 
in the spirit of independence. Of the former 
some of the best are still known : among them 
should be mentioned Petrus Christus, a native of 
Bruges. His best productions are a * Madonna ' 
in the Stadel Institution at Frankfort, No. 65 ; 
two panels representing the * Annunciation,* No. 
529a, and the * Last Judgment,' No. 529b, in the 
Berlin Museum ; two wings of a triptych, contain- 
ing the ' Crucifixion ' 8«id the * Last Judgment,' 
marvellously full of figures, with high finish. No. 
444 in the Hermitage, St. Petersburg ; and a panel 
in four parts. No. 1291 in the Madrid Gallery. 

Three other but more independent masters of 
this time, although largely influenced by the 



Petrtts 
Cknst%is. 



106 



TEE RISE AND PB00BE88 



Gerard van 
der Metre, 



Hugo van 
der Goes, 



Van Eycks, were Gerard van der Meire, Hugo 
van der Goes, and Justus of Ghent. A large 
altar-piece by the first is in St. Bavon at Ghent, 
but a good work by him (according to Crowe 
and Caval.) is the ' Exhumation of St. Hubert,' 
No. 783, ascribed to Dierick Bouts in the cata- 
logue of the National Gallery, while the * Coimt 
of Hennegau with his Patron-Saint,' No. 264, 
may also be considered as genuine. The author- 
ship of the celebrated Grimani miniatures has 
been attributed to Van der Meire, but it is prob- 
able that they are the work of a later painter, 
Gerard Horembout. 

Hugo van der Goes also executed several im- 
portant works, but unfortunately only one can 
now be ascribed to him with certainty (Crowe 
and Caval.), although his name appears in several 
European galleries — our own National Gallery, 
for example, where two are attributed to him — 
this is the important altar-piece in the Hospital 
of S. M. Nuova at Florence, representing the 
* Adoration of the Shepherds.' Not only have his 
works disappeared, but those also of Justus of 
Ghent, whose only existing known picture of merit 
is the * Last Supper ' in S. Agata at Urbino. 

We now return to a much greater master, Rogier 
van der Weyden, bom in 1400 at Tournai, who 
became the head of a school almost as influential 
as that of the Van Eycks. The realism of his art 
was even more exact and uncompromising than 
theirs, and thus his subjects sometimes contain 



Justus of 
Ghent, 



Rogier van 
der Weyden, 



OF TAINTING IN FLANDERS. 



107 



matter which is repulsive. He exceeded his 
predecessors in attention to minute detail, and 
applying this to the themes which he most 
affected — always sorrowful and painful, as martyr- 
doms and the like — he closely delineated the 
outward signs of mental and bodily grief. Among 
his earliest known works is a triptych, depicting 
in the centre a ^Pieta,' and on the side-wings 
the * Nativity ' and the ' Kesurrection,' which is 
preserved in the Berlin Museum, No. 534a. In 
the same museum also there is another beautiful 
triptych by him of scenes from the life of St. 
John the Baptist, No. 534b ; of which a smaller 
replica by the master is No. 62 in the Stadel, 
Frankfort. In the Belvedere, Vienna, should be 
noted a triptych. No. 81, Salle I. 2''^ dtage, and 
two small highly-finished panels, Nos. 18 and 22, 
Salle n. 2°*^ etage. One of his grandest works is 
without doubt the important altar-piece, a ' Last 
Judgment,' painted in nine panels for the Hospital 
at Beaune in Burgundy. About this time some 
interchange of ideas took place between the artists 
of Flanders and those of Italy. Antonello of Mes- 
sina had visited the Netherlands about the middle 
of the century, whence he returned with the new 
secrets of oil medium to Venice. Kogier van 
der Weyden made a long tour in Italy, and came 
back, with his manner little if at all changed, to 
execute some of his finest works. Examples of 
these are a folding altar-piece, an exceedingly 
fine triptych, now No. 535 in the Berlin Museum ; 



108 



THE BI8E AND PBOGEESS 



two in the Pinacothek at Munich, *St. Luke 
painting the Virgin/ No. 634, and the * Epi- 
phany/ a triptych, No. 628 ; a fine triptych also 
at Madrid, No. 2189, the centre a ' Crucifixion ' 
and the * Seven Sacraments,' and on one wing 
the * Expulsion from Eden,' No. 2190, and on 
the other the *Last Judgment/ No. 2192. A 
beautiful small * Madonna and Child with Saints,' 
No. 61, is at the Stadel, Erankfort. There is a 
'Deposition' in the Hague Museum, No. 226, 
ascribed to him : it is not improbably from the 
hand of the master, but does not rank with his 
finest works. Many inferior productions of his 
school are ascribed to him in various European 
galleries: one of the best of these is in the 
National Gallery, No. 667. His son, Eogier van 
der Weyden the younger, painted after his father. 
Some excellent examples are attributed to him 
in the National Gallery — namely, Nos. 653, 654, 
711, 712. Others are to be seen at Frankfort. 

Van der Weyden had one highly-gifted pupil, 
who surpassed him in the extreme delicacy and 
high finish of his work — ^namely, Hans Mending. 
Very few historical facts respecting him are 
known, but several examples of his work remain. 
That which gained him a greater reputation than 
any other is the celebrated Johannis altar-piece, 
depicting the ' Marriage of St. Catharine,' now in 
the collection at the Hospital of St. John at 
Bruges, No. 1, and painted in 1479. Previous to 
this (1473) he executed the fine altar-piece of 



Hans 
Memling, 



OF PAINTING IN FLANDERS, 109 



the * La43t Judgment ' in the Cathedral of Dant- 
zig, now spoiled by much restoration. But the 
Hospital at Bruges contains other fine works of 
this master, and notably one, No. 2, painted at a 
later period, the * Shrine of St. Ursula,' perhaps the 
finest existing specimen of early Flemish art of 
this type. Certainly, for composition and drama- 
tic power as understood at this period, and for 
perfection of workmanship, it is unrivalled. The 
history occupies six compartments, besides two 
ends, and panels on the top, all completed with 
the same care. No. 3, a triptych, centre-piece 
the * Adoration of the Bangs,' in which the dis- 
tant landscape is exceedingly beautiful. No. 4, 
a diptych, a * Virgin and Donator.' No. 5, a 
* Sibyl,' is less excellent. Of No. 6, a triptych, 
the finest part is the outside of the lateral panels. 
In the Academy at Bruges Nos. 4 to 8 constitute 
a fine and large triptych. In the Uffizi is a 
beautiful * Madonna,' No. 703. At the Munich 
Pinacothek No. 655 is an interesting example, 
the * Seven Joys of the Virgin ;' and in the Turin 
Gallery No. 358 is that of the * Seven Sorrows 
of the Virgin ' — both remarkable for the number 
of incidents depicted and of figures introduced 
into a moderate-sized canvas, yet every detail 
is finished with elaboration and care. There is a 
large work by Memling, an altar-piece in the 
Cathedral of Lubeck, painted in 1491, which has 
not the attractive qualities of his smaller works : 
it was his last production of any importance. 



110 



THE EISE AND PROGRESS 



Dierick 
Bouts. 



Oherardt 
David. 



Our National Gallery possesses two examples of 
the master — No. 686, a ' Virgin and Child/ some- 
what injured by cleaning; and No. 747, the 
* Baptist and St. Lawrence :' also two others so 
named, but works of his school. In the Louvre 
are two fine panels, N09. 288 and 289, a ^ St. John ' 
and ' Mary Magdalen.' At Brussels are two fine 
portraits of William Moreel and his wife, Nos. 21 
and 22 ; while at Frankfort is a portrait, No. 63. 
At Dresden is a small panel, a * St. Christopher 
and Child,' No. 2417 ; and at Berlin is a small 
' Madonna and Child,' No. 528b. 

Dierick Bouts, or Stuerboudt, is another painter 
of the Van Eyck school, who, born at Haarlem, 
studied art in Flanders, as his pictures testify. 
The most important are a * Last Supper ' in St. 
Pierre at Louvain, and two pictures of a legendary 
subject, painted for the Town Hall there, but now 
in the Museum at Brussels, Nos. 30 and 31. 
Two excellent examples exist at Berlin, Nos. 
533 and 539 ; and another is No. 58a at Frankfort. 
Several works in different European galleries, 
catalogued as Memling's, were probably painted 
by Dierick Bouts. 

After the death of Memling the purity of 
Netherlandish art declined, and the style became 
changed through associations with Italy and its 
art. A few still retained the influence of Weyden 
and Memling, of whom Gherardt David should 
be mentioned, whose best work is a * Madonna 
and Child,' an altar-piece at Bouen. His pupil 



OF PAINTING IN FLANDERS, 111 



Joachim de Patinir should be named : examples 
of his work exist in our National Gallery, at 
Berlin, and elsewhere. 

But towards the end of the fifteenth century- 
appeared an artist of great power, Quintin 
Massys, or Matsys (1466-1529), who first gave 
to the Antwerp school its subsequent influential 
position. His greatest work, paiated in 1508, 
is the well-known one in three compartments, 
the centre or chief of which is a 'Deposition,' 
Nos. 245-6-7-8-9 in the Gallery at Antwerp, 
a production which gaiaed for him an immense 
reputation. In a different style, being warmer 
in tone and fuller in colour, is a large composi- 
tion of numerous figures, depicting the Virgin in 
glory with saints and others below. No. 449 in the 
Hermitage, St. Petersburg. He executed also 
several genre pictures, exhibiting clever delinea- 
tions of character. Of these there is a fine example, 
well known as the * Two Misers,' belonging to the 
Queen, at Windsor. Others of a similar char- 
acter are to be seen in the National Gallery, 
No. 944, where a * Salvator Mundi,' No. 295, is 
attributed to him ; in the Louvre, No. 279 ; in 
the Palazzo Doria at Eome ; and in the Dresden 
Gallery, No. 1721. There is also a portrait by 
him. No. 37, Salle 11. 2°*^ 6tage, in the Belvedere 
at Vienna. 

Jan Gossaert, or Mabuse (1470-1532), was a 
master of this time who seems to have followed 
the style of Matsys until he visited Italy, when, 



Quintin 
Matsys. 



Sixteenth 
century. 



Jan 
Mabuse. 



112 



TEE BISE AND PE0GEES8 



Bernard 
van Orley. 



like 80 many other Flemish artists, such as 
Bernard van Orley and Michael Coxie, he became 
greatly changed in manner by southern influence. 
Mabuse's finest work, an ^ Adoration of the Kings,' 
is in the Castle Howard Collection. An important 
triptych is in the Cassel Gallery, No. 58; and 
another may be noted at Brussels, No. 13. A 
good example is seen in the Louvre, a ^ Madonna 
and Child,' No. 278; at Munich, in the Pina- 
cothek, No. 99 ; and two at Vienna, Nos. 9 and 10 
in the Salle II. 2^^*^ etage. Of B. van Orley, two 
important panels, the ^ Desecration of the Temple 
by Antiochus Epiphanes ' and a * Descent of the 
Holy Ghost,' No. 59, Salle II. 2°^ etage, exist in 
the Belvedere at Vienna. At Brussels, among 
three works by him, a portrait of the doctor 
Zelle, No. 27, and an altar-piece in five parts, 
illustrating the ' Trials and Patience of Job,' 
No. 368, may be mentioned. An * Adoration of 
the Kings,' No. 464, is in the Antwerp Gallery ; 
and a fine * Descent from the Cross ' is No. 474 
in the Hermitage, St. Petersburg. ^ 

M. Coxcyen, or Coxie, was a pupil of Orley 
and lived until 1592. His chief work was a care- 
fully made and excellent copy of the Van Eyck 
altar-piece in St. Bavon, executed for Philip II. of 
Spain, of which the chief parts have since been 
dispersed to MJonieh and Berlin, while the side- 
wings replace at St^ Bavon the original ones, 
which are in Berlin also (see p, 103). 

Other masters Qf this period were Lambert 



Michael 
Coxie, 



OF PAINTING IN FLANDEB8, 



113 



Lombard, or Sustennann, Antonio Moro, Peter 
Pourbus, Frans Pourbus the elder and younger, 
and Paul Bril, who lived just before the time 
of Bubens. Of Sustermann little need be said, 
except that his style was formed in Italy. For 
examples of his work, No. 491 in the Hermitage, 
No. 20 at Brussels, and No. 266 in the National 
Gallery may be noted. His pupil Frans Floris 
was a painter of considerable talent. 

Moro and the Pourbuses became famous as 
portrait-painters, and as such had benefited by 
their knowledge of Italian art. Some good 
portraits by Moro are at Madrid: No. 1484 is in- 
teresting as being that of Queen Mary married 
to Philip II. of Spain. Equally fine and interest- 
ing are two portraits of Sir Thomas Gresham 
and his wife, Nos. 480 and 481 in the Hermitage. 
There is a good portrait of a dwarf of Charles V., 
No. 342, in the Louvre. A portrait by Moro is 
in our National Gallery, No. 184; one of Sir 
T. Gresham occurs in our National Portrait 
Gallery ; two are at Dresden, Nos. 1085, 1085a ; 
another at Munich, in the Pinacothek, No. 1293 ; 
and two at Vienna, in the Belvedere, Nos. 8, 9, 
Salle VII. 1®' etage ; besides his own portrait, 
No. 462 in the Uffizi. Moro resided several 
years in England, was appointed painter to 
Queen Mary, and became Sir Anthony More. 

Peter Pourbus (1510-83) was the head of a 
family of painters, examples by whom are not un- 
frequently met with. Among several by him at 



Suster' 
jnann. 



Antonio 
Moro, 



Peter 
Pourbus, 



lU 



THE BT8E AND PE0GRE88 



Frans 
Fourbus 
the elder. 



Frans 
Fourims 
the younger. 



The 
Bruegheh, 



Fieter 
Brueghel 
the elder. 



Vienna Nos. 23, 24, 28, Salle III. 2"*^ etage, may 
be noted; while in the Academy at Bruges are 
two of his finest works, a ' Last Judgment' and a 
triptych of the ^ Descent from the Cross,' Nos. 17, 
18. Two canvases, containing three heads each, 
finely painted, are Nos. 487 and 488 in the Her- 
mitage. At the Louvre there is one picture, 
the ^ Resurrection,' No. 391. 

Peter's son, Frans Pourbus, surpassed his father 
in portraiture, good illustrations of which may be 
seen at Vienna in Nps. 13, 19, 21, Salle HI. 2°** 
etage. There is also a portrait of Queen Elizabeth, 
No. 265, in the Trippenhuis at Amsterdam. 

Frans the younger, son of the preceding, painted 
portraits with equal success, and some large com- 
positions also. Numerous illustrations exist in 
the Louvre, of which four are portraits. No. 396 
being the best. There also is his masterpiece, a 
* Last Supper,' No. 392. Two good examples are 
Nos. 268, 269 in the Museum at Brussels. 

The Brueghels were nearly contemporary with 
the last-named group. The works of Pieter 
Brueghel the elder (1530-1569) are well known, 
but his son Jan Brueghel was more celebrated. 
There is a good specimen of the father at 
Hampton Court, a simple genre scene, although 
known as the 'Slaughter of the Innocents,' 
No. 748. In such works he always depicted 
the peasants and their life at his time ; hence he 
was distinguislied as " Peasant Brueghel." The 
best collection of his pictures, which illustrate this 



OF PAINTING IN FLANDERS. 



115 



remark, is to be found at the Belvedere, Vienna : 
see Nos. 1, 9, 11, and 44 in Salle III. 2°^ etage, 
among many others. In the Munich Pina- 
cothek are two similar works, Nos. 784 and 80 1 ; 
in the Brussels Museum is another. No. 2 ; and at 
Madrid is a remarkable picture of the ' Triumph 
of Death,' No. 1221. Jan Brueghel, known 
also as "Velvet Brueghel," painted with 
extreme care and minuteness animals of all 
kinds and flowers in landscape, and was often 
associated with other painters in the same 
work. Examples may be seen in numerous 
galleries; as Nos. 58, 59 in the Louvre at 
Paris; an excellent one. No. 200, is in the 
Hague Museum ; another in the Trippenhuis at 
Amsterdam, No. 56 ; and a third in the Brussels 
Museum, No. 129 ; also two at the Hermitage, 
Nos. 513 and 514 ; while at Munich, Berlin, and 
Vienna there are several specimens, for which 
see catalogues at the end of the volume. In the 
Madrid Gallery no less than fifty-two large 
works, crowded with minute details, are at- 
tributed to this master, while upwards of thirty 
are ascribed to him at Dresden ! His brother, the 
younger Pieter Brueghel, was an artist of less 
ability, and, from the fact of his fondness for de- 
picting grotesque figures and demons, obtained the 
name of " Brueghel d'Enfer." An example of his 
style may be cited in the Brussels Museum, No. 3. 
A contemporary of Pieter Brueghel the elder was 
Martin de Vos, who studied in Italy. Numerous 



Jan 
Brueghel, 



Pieter 
Snteghel 
IJie younger. 



M.de Vos. 



116 



TEE BJSh AND PB0QBE88 



C, de Vos. 



Paul Bril 



Seventeent'^i 
century. 



Bubens, 



examples of his crowded compositions are to be 
found in the Gallery at Antwerp, Nos. 71 to 103. 
Here also Nos. 104, 107 are good pictures by 
Cornelis de Vos, who lived fifty years later; a 
fine example is No. 832 at Berlin. At Brussels 
works by both are to be found — by Martin some 
portraits, Nos. 341, 342; and by Comelis an 
admirable portrait group. No. 453. 

Paul Bril was one of the early Flemish land- 
scape-painters ; he spent most of his life at 
Rome with his elder brother Matthew, and died 
there. One of his best works is a ^ Tobias and the 
Angel ' in the Gallery at Dresden, No. 784, where 
there are also two landscapes by Matthew, Nos. 
777, 778. A fine specimen of Paul is at Munich, 
No. 805 ; another is No. 714, at Berlin. Several 
are in the Louvre, others in the Turin Gallery 
and in the Uffizi at Florence. 

The commencement of the seventeenth century 
witnessed a new development of art in the Flemish 
school, which produced another style differing 
from any that had preceded it in the Netherlands 
and Brabant, through the genius of Peter Paul 
Rubens, who was bom at Antwerp in 1577. His 
works rapidly attained an extraordinary celebrity, 
and his pupils and followers were numerous and 
enthusiastic. His fertility of conception was 
remarkable, and he produced large and im- 
portant works with a facility hitherto unknown. 
They are characterised by boldness of design and 
powerful dramatic action, and are executed with 



OF PAmTING IN FLANDERS. 11 



great knowledge of the figure and with a bril- 
liancy of colouring peculiar to the master. At 
the same time it is impossible to overlook the 
fact that many of the best known examples 
exhibit drawing which is flagrantly incorrect, 
colouring which is crude and unnatural, vulgarity 
of form, and even coarseness or bad taste in the 
idea presented. Much of this faultiness is doubt- 
less due to the very large share which his pupils 
had in the production of the great works which 
bear the master's name. At the same time the fact 
is not to be overlooked that some of these were 
painted to be seen only at considerable distance 
from the eye, and not at the close range within 
which they are placed in museums. Abundant 
illustrations of the accuracy of these remarks 
may be seen in the large canvases which fill 
the Salle de Rubens in thePinacothek at Munich, 
those particularly of the ^ Last Judgment,' No. 
258, ' Tallen Angels,' No. 250, ' Massacre of the 
Lmocents,' No. 269, and *La Femme Apoca- 
lyptique,' No. 281. Here may be seen nume- 
rous nude figures, designed from repulsive 
models, and moreover badly drawn and crude 
in colour ; while in an adjacent cabinet numerous 
small and slight studies exist, designs in fact for 
the larger works, from the hand of Rubens him- 
self, and which are in most instances infinitely 
finer than the completed pictures. See Nos. 889, 
917, 908, &c. Numerous examples of these 
little studies exist at the Hermitage, St. Peters- 



118 



TBE BI8E AND PB0GRES8 



Rvbens's 

aacred 

workt. 



burg, such as Nos. 557, 569, 570, 572, 573, 
590, 593; besides which should be noted 
six fine sketches made in 1635 for triumphal 
arches to grace the entry of the Infante 
Ferdinand of Spain into Antwerp. Two small 
works of this order are at Berlin, of which No. 
780 is worthy of note. 

Eubens received his first instruction from Otho 
van Veen, or Otto Vsenius, an Antwei-p painter, 
but when twenty-three years of age he went 
to Italy, and remained there seven years, chiefly 
at Venice, closely studying the works of Paolo 
Veronese; whose style he emulated. On his 
return he executed an almost incredible number 
of large pictures, which testify to his having been 
a most rapid and powerful painter. First among 
his productions ranks the far-famed * Descent 
from the Cross,' now in Antwerp Cathedral, a 
tnily magnificent composition, finely drawn and 
harmonious in colour. Eubens's other large work 
there, the 'Eaising of the Cross,' which hangs as 
its pendant, is inferior, although the Christ is 
especially grand; the small painting of the 
^ Resurrection' is still less pleasing. The Gallery 
at Antwerp contains several examples of the 
master, three of which are among his best works : 
the great ^Crucifixion,' No. 313, realistic to a 
painful degree; the ^Adoration of the Magi,' 
No. 298, remarkable for its brilliant colouring ; 
and the well-known ^Christ on the Cross,' No. 
297. The ' Incredulity of St. Thomas,' No. 307, 



OF PAINTING IN FLANDERS, 119 



also there, is a less important painting. In the 
Church of St. Jacques there is a large *Holy 
Family' over the high altar, into which Kubens 
has introduced the members of his family. The 
churches also at Mechlin are rich in altar-pieces 
by Rubens. In that dedicated to St. John is a 
large * Adoration of the Wise Men,' with two 
wings painted on both sides ; and in Notre Dame 
is a similar altar-piece, of which the centre panel 
finely represents the * Draught of Fishes.' Large 
compositions of a similar character by Eubens 
are so numerous in foreign galleries that only a 
few of the most important can be enumerated. 
The Belvedere at Vienna, among several, contains 
an * Assumption of the Virgin,' * St. Ambrose re- 
fusing the Emperor Theodosius entrance to the j 
Church,' ' St. Francois Xavier working Miracles,' j 
and * Ignatius Loyola casting out Devils,' forming ] 
Nos. 2, 8, 3, 1, Salle IV., P. P. Kubens ; and a i 
large votive altar-piece of St. Ildephonse, No. 1, ; 
Salle v., P. P. Kubens. At the Liechtenstein ■ 
Gallery, Vienna, there are several works and excel- 1 
lent portraits ; but especially to be noted is a series ; 
of paintings decorating a large hall, Nos. 89 to 94, 
relating to the death of Decius. He is repre- 
sented at Berlin by a fine composition, the ' Rais- 
ing of Lazarus,' No. 783. At the Hermitage, 
St. Petersburg, may be noted a good ^Descent 
from the Cross,' No. 546 ; a * Madonna and Child 
with Saints,' No. 541 ; and an ' Adoration of the 
Kings/ No. 536, in which the Virgin is a portrait 



120 



TBE EI8E AND PROGRESS 



Mythologi" 
cod works, 



of Helena Founnent, among several others. Three 
very fine large works are at Madrid, an * Adoration 
of the Kings/ No. 1559, the 'Brazen Serpent,' 
No. 1558 (of which there is a small repetition in 
the National Gallery, No. 59), and a dashing 
* St. George and the Dragon,' No. 1565. There 
is a fine * Flight of Lot,' No. 425, in the Louvre. 
Two large canvases are in the Lyons Museum, of 
which the 'Adoration of the Magi,' No. 83, is 
the finer. Two good works are at Cassel, a 
'Holy Family with Saints,' No. 187, and a 
' Flight into Egypt,' No. 176. 

Besides those works of which the subjects have 
been chiefly taken from sacred history, Rubens 
executed numerous historical, mythological, and 
allegorical paintings. Our National Gallery con- 
tains two fair examples in the 'Rape of the 
Sabines,' No. 38, and the ' Judgment of Paris,' No. 
194, of which latter there is a fine repetition at 
Madrid, No. 1590. In the Salon Carr^ at the 
Louvre is the large composition ' Thomyris and 
the Head of Cyrus,' No. 433. 

A number of fanciful compositions, demanded 
at that time by the taste of royalty, in a 
style which associated portraiture with mytho- 
logical characters, is well exemplified at the 
Louvre by twenty-one large canvases illustrating 
the history of Marie de Medicis, No. 434 to 
No. 454. These were designed by the master, 
and largely executed by his scholars. A good 
* Venus and Vulcan ' is No. 292 in the Brussels 



Allegorical 
works. 



OF PAINTING IN FLANDERS. 



121 



HtLseiim. Two fine compositions, smaller but 
Baperior to the foregoing, exist at Madrid — viz. 
the * Garden of Love/ No. 1611 (repetitions of 
which occur at Dresden and Vienna), and the 
'Peasants' Dance,' No. 1612. Mythological 
subjects abound in the Dresden Museum, among 
which should be mentioned ^ Diana and her 
Nymphs,' No. 825. At Vienna, in the Belvedere, 
may be noted a ^ Feast of Venus,' No. 7, Salle V., 
P. P. Eubens, and the ^Four Quarters of the 
Globe,' No. 10, SaUe IV. 1«^ 6tage ; in the Pitti 
at Florence the * Horrors of War,' No. 86 ; and 
in the Hermitage at St. Petersburg fine figures 
of * Abundance and the Eiver Tigris,' besides 
several small works, such as Nos. 549, 552. 
Bather larger and particularly fine are a * Group 
of Children and Fruit,' No. 779, and a * Perseus 
and Andromeda,' No. 785, at Berlin. At Madrid 
fine works by Eubens are numerous : for example, 
•Andromeda and Perseus,' No. 1584; * Ceres and 
Pomona,' No. 1585; 'Ceres and Pan,' No. 1593, 
in which the fruit is by Snyders ; and the * Legend 
of Eodolf I. of Hapsburg,' No. 1566. 

Eubens was scarcely less powerful 6ts a portrait- 
painter. His first and second wives, Isabella 
Brandt and Helena Fourment, were very fre- 
quently painted by him. Of the first there is a 
good one at Munich, seated with Eubens himself, 
No. 256 ; a capital sitting portrait is No. 575 at 
the Hermitage; and one is at the Hague, No. 
213. Those of his second wife are to be found 



Portraits, 



122 



THE BI8E AND PROGRESS 



Landscape 

and 

animals. 



in almost every gallery of Europe — at Vienna, 
Munich, Paris; and at the Hague there is an 
especially pleasing likeness. No. 214; but the 
most magnificent one, life-size and full length, is 
No. 576 at the Hermitage. Other portraits exist 
at the Louvre, of which most worthy of note are 
Nos. 450, 455, 456, and 460. In the Pitti at 
Florence there is an admirable portrait group, 
comprising Rubens himself and the philosophers 
Lipsius and Grotius, No. 85. Our National 
Gallery possesses a well-known example in the 
^ Chapeau de Poil,' No. 852. A pair of excellent 
portraits should be noted at Brussels, Nos. 294, 
295. Numerous and good examples of por- 
traiture are to be seen in the Madrid Gallery : 
mark Nos. 1606, 1609, 1610; and two equestrian 
portraits, Nos. 1607 and 1608. Very fine por- 
traits are to be found at the Hermitage: a full- 
length of Philip IV., No. 559, and three admirable 
portraits, Nos. 578, 580, 581, should be mentioned, 
among many others. Many striking examples 
are at Dresden, among which may be noted Nos. 
845, 847, and 849. 

Landscapes and animal pieces are often to be 
met with by this fertile master. At Vienna Nos. 
13 and 19, SaUe V., P. P. Rubens, and No. 7, Salle 
IV., P. P. Rubens, and at Munich Nos. 916 and 922 
are all good examples. With these should be 
classed his * Lions,' No. 592 at the Hermitage ; 
and his ^ Tigress and Lion,' No. 834 at Dresden. 
One of the best of these is at Madrid, No. 1583 ; 



OF PAINTING IN FLANDERS. 123 



Frans 
Snyders, 



and No. 1594 is a representation of * Mercury and 
Argus ' in which the landscape is prominent. 
Two admirable landscapes exist at the Hermitage, 
Nos. 594, 595, the first with the rising moon, the 
second with a rainbow. A grand view of the 
Escorial is No. 836 at Dresden. A fine ^Autumn ' 
landscape is in our National Gallery, No. 66. 

In representations of animals Rubens was 
surpassed by Frans Snyders, one of the most 
vigorous and talented portrayers that ever lived 
of hunted animals. In the Hague Gallery there 
is a good example of a stag-hunt, No. 222, the 
landscape in which is by Rubens. At Brussels, 
No. 314, and at Antwerp, No. 335, are fine works 
of Snyders, as are also Nos. 297, 305, 317 in the 
Munich Pinacothek, and Nos. 313, 314 in the 
Trippenhuis at Amsterdam. At Madrid are several 
very fine works, especially Nos. 1677 and 1681. 
At the Hermitage are some of his chief large 
canvases : among them should be noted the i 
* Fruit-seller,' the * Vegetable-seller,' the ' Fish- 
dealer,' and the * Game-shop,' each with figures 
of life size, Nos. 1312 to 1315. Others are at the 
Louvre, at Berlin, at Dresden, rich in good speci- 
mens, and elsewhere, for which see catalogues. 

Jan Fyt was another Flemish artist who ex- jan Fyt 
celled particularly in painting dead game, as well | 
as flowers and fruit. Of the latter several fine j 
specimens exist; for example. No. 225 in the Turin . 
Gallery. Many excellent studies of the first- I 
named subjects are to be found in the Antwerp ' 



124 



THE BI8E AND PB0GBE88 



Jaccb 
Jordaens, 



Gallery, Nos. 171, 172; in the Pinacothek at 
Munich, Nos. 325, 339, 341 ; and in the Madrid 
Gallery, Nos. 1369, 1370. Other examples are 
to be found in the Louvre and at Vienna, and 
one in our National Gallery, No. 1003. 

Ja^.ob Jordaens was one of Rubens's most dis- 
tinguished scholars and followers: he was most 
successful in his reproductions of low life, and 
these were generally wanting in the nobler quali- 
ties of his master. A few of the larger and best 
works can alone be enumerated. Some of the 
finest of these are at Brussels, Nos. 216 to 221 : 
No. 217, an allegory, being perhaps the chief. 
At Munich, in the Pinacothek, No. 324 is a good 
example. The Hermitage contains many works, 
among which Nos. 647, 651, 652, and 653, 
his own portrait, may be mentioned. Numerous 
examples are at Dresden, of which No. 961 is 
one of the best. In the Louvre at Paris there 
are several excellent works, Nos. 251 to 257. In 
the Trippenhuis at Amsterdam, No. 175 ; in the 
Antwerp Museum, Nos. 215 to 222; in the 
Belvedere at Vienna, No. 27, Salle VI. 1®' etage ; 
in the GaUery at Madrid, Nos. 1404, 1405, 1407, 
1410 ; and in the Cassel Gallery, No. 266. 

By far the greatest of Rubens's pupils was the 
renowned Anton van Dyck (1599-1641), one of 
the first masters of portraiture that ever lived, 
although his productions were not confined to 
this branch of art alone. One of his finest com- 
positions is the large * Crucifixion' in the 



Van Dyck, 



Sacred 
subjects. 



OF PAINTING IN FLANDERS. 



125 



Cathedral of Mechlin, and a small picture of the 
same subject is in the Church of St. Jacques at 
Antwerp. Two altar-pieces are at Vienna, Nos. 2 
and 8, Salle III. 1®' etage ; and another is the 
* Incredulity of St. Thomas,' No. 607 in the 
Hermitage, St. Petersburg. A favourite subject 
with the master is the 'Dead Christ:' one of 
these is in the Berlin Museum, No. 778, where 
there is also a * Christ crowned with Thorns,' No. 
770 ; while at Antwerp Nos. 403 and 404, and at 
Munich Nos. 203 and 212, are similar examples. 
Eepresentations of the Holy Family by Van 
Dyck are to be found in many galleries : as, for 
instance, that fine work at the Louvre, No. 137 ; 
one at Vienna, No. 33, Salle III. 1®' etage ; the 
admirable one known as the 'Vierge aux Per- 
dreaux,' No. 603 at the Hermitage, and of which 
there is almost a replica at the Pitti ; in the Turin 
collection, No. 384 ; and in the Accademia di San 
Luca at Rome, No. 13. Still it is in portraiture 
that he has rarely been equalled, for the delinea- 
tion of character, ease of pose, charm of expression, 
and pictorial quality, and it is here that we learn 
to appreciate the great talents of this master. 

Examples are to be seen in almost every Euro- Portraits. 
pean gallery, for Van Dyck was held in great 
esteem by the aristocracy of Italy, England, and 
Spain. At these three courts he passed his life, 
occupied in painting the portraits of some of the 
best known men of the time. Several exist of 
Charles I. and of his family, which may first be Charles L 



126 



TEE BISE AND PROGRESS 



Children. 



Equestrian 
and others. 



mentioned. The King is represented in a grand 
portrait in the Louvre at Paris, No. 142 ; at 
Hampton Court, No. 85; at Dresden, No. 985, 
No. 986 being Queen Henrietta Maria; in the 
Hermitage, St. Petersburg, No. 609, with its 
pendant, the Queen, No. 610 ; and in the Pitti 
at Florence, together with his Queen, Henrietta 
Maria, No. 150. Perhaps the most charming of 
Van Dyck's productions is a group of the three 
children of Charles I., No. 338 in the Turin 
Gallery, a masterpiece of composition, colour, 
and technical power, which alone is worth a 
journey to Turin to see. A similar group, but 
less pleasing, is at Dresden, No. 987 ; another, very 
beautiful, No. 790, is at Berlin; a small study 
at the Louvre, No. 143 ; a portrait of William of 
Orange as a boy. No. 611, and a girl and boy of 
the Wharton family, No. 618 — both at the Her- 
mitage ; and the portraits of two children are at 
Amsterdam in the Trippenhuis, No. 86. There 
are two noble equestrian portraits by Van Dyck 
which must be remembered: one at Turin of 
Prince Thomas of Savoy, No. 363; and the 
other in the Tribune of the XJflSzi at Florence 
of Charles V., No. 1128. Equally fine portraits 
— some full-length and others smaller — are those 
of Prince Thomas of Carignan and of the Infanta 
Isabella of Spain, Nos. 782 and 788, among 
many admirable examples in the Berlin Museum ; 
of Cardinal Bentivoglio, No. 82 in the Pitti at 
Florence; of Jean Monfort, No. 1115 in the Uffizi 



OF PAINTING IN FLANDERS. 



127 



there; of Charles Malery, No. 209, and several 
others, at Munich ; and of Alexandre de la Faille, 
No. 192 at Brussels. A large number of fine 
examples are at the Hermitage, mostly English 
portraits, such as those of Earl Danby and Sir 
Thomas Wharton, Nos. 615 and 617 ; Archbishop 
Laud, No. 612 (a replica of the picture at 
Lambeth) ; Inigo Jones, No. 626 ; and many 
others, which will be found in the catalogue. 
At Prince Liechtenstein's Gallery, Vienna, are 
several others, of which Nos. 115 and 118 are 
the best. The Madrid Gallery contains several 
fine portraits: especially remarkable are Nos. 1320, 
1322, 1327, 1328, 1329, 1330 (the well-known 
double portrait of A. van Dyck and the Count of 
Bristol), and No. 1331. In the Cassel Gallery 
also Nos. 290, 294, 295, and 300 should be noticed, 
and some splendid portraits in the Palazzo Brignoli 
at Genoa. Li the Louvre are many excellent 
specimens, Nos. 145 to 155, among which Nos. 148 
to 150 are particularly fine ; so also at the Hague 
are Nos. 203 to 206, and at Antwerp, No. 405 ; two 
or three are in the National Gallery — No. 52, the 
* Head of Gevartius,' being particularly fine. Be- 
sides all these there is the magnificent collection 
of portraits in the possession of the Queen at 
Windsor Castle. 

Gaspard de Crayer must be named here, al- Gaspardde 
though bom in 1582, some years before Van 
Dyck. He was a contemporary of Kubens, and 
an admirable portrait-painter in his own style, 



Crayer, 



128 



^THE BI8E AND PROGRESS 



P. deCham- 
paigne. 



which was strongly contrasted with that of the 
great colourist, partaking of the dryer manner of 
the German school. Later in life he painted 
some important sacred subjects, examples of 
which are to be seen in the Museum of Brussels, 
Nos. 167, 169, 413 being the best among many ; 
and in the Louvre is one, No. 102, where also is 
an equestrian portrait. No. 103. 

Philippe de Champaigne (1602-1674) was a 
Fleming by birth and early education, but after- 
wards studied and resided chiefly in France. 
Examples of his works, which were partly religious 
compositions, but chiefly portraits, may be seen 
as follows. Of the first class, one of the most 
important is that at the Museum of Lyons, the 
' Finding of the Relics of St. Gervais,' No. 105 ; 
the ' Moses and the Law,' No. 664 at the Henni- 
tage; and the * Christ in the House of Simon,' 
No. 76 in the Louvre. Several portraits exist 
there also, Nos. 83, 88, 94, among others. The 
master is nowhere better seen than at Brussels : of 
his works there may be mentioned a series from 
the legend of St. Benoit, Nos. 142-146, and two 
fine single figures of saints, Nos. 140, 141. 

It can scarcely be said that a Flemish school 
of distinct character existed after the era of 
Kubens and his immediate followers. The names 
of a few who may be held to merit, at all events 
to some extent, the appellation of "Flemish," 
may follow here. 

In portraiture may be noted Gonzales Gocques, 



OF FAINTING IN FLANDERS. 129 



Justus Sustennans, Jacques van Oost, the elder | 
and younger. I 

Painters of historical or mythological subjects | 
may be noted : Erasmus Quellinus, Theodore van ; 
Thulden, Abraham van Diepenbeck — all three j 
pupils of Kubens ; J. G. de Lairesse ; and Van der j 
Meulen, the historical painter of Louis XIV., i 
whose works are in the Louvre. j 

Architecture : Pieter Neefs, the elder, whose ' 
church interiors are admirable, and the younger ; i 
Hendrik van Balen. | 

Landscape : Comelis Huysmans. j 

Still-life : Alexander Adriaenssen the younger^ 
Jan van Essen, Daniel Seghers, Clara Peeters. 

Illustrative works by all these will be found 
noted in the numerous catalogues at the end of 
this volume.* 



n 



130 



THE RISE AND PROGRESS 



A TABLE 
Op the Dates op i'he Principal Painters op the Flemish ScHot>L. 



School. 



Bruges . 
Bruges . 
Tournai . 

Bruges . 

LouYain . 

Ghent 
Ghent 
Ghent . 

Bruges . 
Bruges . 

Antwerp . 
Antwerp . 
Brussels . 
Mechlin . 

Liege 

Antwerp . 
Utrecht . 
Brussels . 
Antwerp . 
Antwerp . 
Antwerp . 
Antwerp . 




Jean van der Asselt, raeord 

Xoo4 • • • • • 

Melchior Broederlam, records 

1382-1401 .... 
Jean Malwel, or M«lhuel 

first record 1392. . . 
Hubert Tan Eyck . . . 
Jan van Eyck, about 
Bogier van der Weyden, or 

Van Brigge .... 
Petrus Ghristus, records 

1444-71 

Dierick Stuerboudt, or Bouts, 

first record 1450 . . , 
Hugo van der Goes . 
Justus of Ghent . 
Gerard van der Meire, records 

1447-74 

Hans Memling . « . 
Gherardt David, first record 

1487 

Quintin Matsys . . 
Jan Gossaert Mabuse. 
Bernard van Orley . 
Michiel van Coxcyen, or 

Coxie 

Lambert Lombard, or Suster- 

mann 

Frans Floris .... 
Antonio Mor, or Moro 
Pieter Brueghel, elder . 
Martin de Vos 
Frans Pourbus, the elder 

PaulBril 

Otho van Veen, or Vsenius 



1366 
1386 

1400 



1468 
1468 



1430? 



1466 
1470 
1470 

1499 

1506 
1520 
1525 
1530 
1531 
1540 
1556 
1558 



Death. 



1415 

1426 

1440-1 

1464 



1475 
1482 



1495 

1523 
1529 
1532 
1541 

1592 

1566 
1570 
1581 
1569 
1603 
1580 
1626 
1629 



OF PAINTING IN FLANDEBS. 



131 



School. 



Brussels . 

Antwerp . 
Antwerp . 
Antwerp . 
Antwerp . 
Antwerp . 
Antwerp . 
Antwerp . 
Antwerp . 
Antwerp . 
Antwerp . 
Antwerp . 
Antwerp . 
Bruges . 
Brussels . 

Antwerp . 
Antwerp . 
Antwerp . 
Antwerp . 
Antwerp . 
Antwerp . 
Antwerp . 
Brussels . 
Bruges . 
Liege 
Antwerp . 




Jan Brue<2:hel, called Velvet 

Brueghel .... 
Frans Pourbus, the younger 
Pieter Neefs, elder, about 
Peter Paul Rubens . 
Frans Snyders. 
David Teniers, the elder 
Gaspard de Crayer 
Gornelis de Vos . . 
Daniel Seghers 
Jacob Jordaens 
Justus Bustermans . 
Anton van Dyck . . 
Pieter Neefs, the younger 
Jacques van Oost, the eider 
Philippe de Champaigne . 
Jan van Essen 
Theodore van Thulden . 
Erasmus Quellinus . 
Abraham Diepenbeck 
David Teniers, the younger 
Gonzales Cocques 

Jan Fyt 

Abraliam Teniers . . 
Anton F. van der Meulen 
Jacques van Oost, the younger 
J. G. de Lairesse . . . 
Gornelis Huysmans . . 
A. Adriaenssen, the younger 
Clara Peeters, 17tb century 



1568 

1570 

1570 

1577 

1579 

1582 

1582 

1585? 

1590 

1593 

1597 

1599 

1600 

1600 

1602 

1607 

1607 

1607 

1607 

1610 

1614 

1625 

1629 

1684 

1639 

1640 

1648 



Death. 



1625 

1622 

1651 

1640 

1657 

1649 

1669 

1661 

1661 

1678 

1681 

1641 

1675 

1671 

1674 

1662 

1676 

1678 

1675 

1694 

1684 

1671 

1671 

1690 

1713 

1711 

1727 

1685 



Y.1 



132 



TEE RISE AND PB0QBE88 



Fifteenth 
century. 



Geerrit van 
Maarlem, 



THE RISE AND PROGRESS OF PAINTING IN 

HOLLAND. 

It is impossible to speak with certainty of the 
early painters and their work in Holland. That 
a very early school did exist is not doubtful : 
traces of ancient mural decorations are extant, and 
among the numerous pictures which have been 
destroyed by zealous fanatics there is reason to 
believe that works of the fourteenth and fifteenth 
century were altogether lost, and with them the 
names of their authors. The earliest of whom 
trustworthy records remain are Albert van 
Ouwater and his pupil Gerhard or Geerrit van 
Haarlem, both Haarlem painters, and probably 
painting about the middle of the fifteenth cen- 
tury. -The Belvedere at Vienna has two panels 
representing a * Dead Christ and Mourners ' and 
* Scenes from the Legend of the Body of John 
the Baptist,' Nos. 58, 60, Salle II. 2°^ etage, 
attributed to the latter ; and there is also a 
triptych at Mimich so named, Nos. 84, 85, 86 ; 
but it must be admitted that no works of either 
now exist which can be regarded with certainty 
as authentic. The influence of the Van Eycks 
gave a great impulse to the practice of pictorial 
art in Holland towards the end of the fifteenth 



OF PAINTING IN HOLLAND. 133 



Century; and at Leiden are to be found the | 
earliest examples of the Dutch school. These 
are the works of Comelis Engelbertsz (1468- 
1533), two of which are preserved in the Stede- 
iijk Museum there, Nos. 9 and 10. The former 
is an altar-piece in three compartments, the 
centre being a ' Crucifixion,' in excellent preser- 
yation, a large and crowded composition, suggest- 
ing the style of Rogier van der Weyden, with 
much warmth of colour and minute finish of 
rich costume, doubtless learned from the Van 
Eycks. The wings depict the * Sacrifice of Isaac ' 
and the ' Brazen Serpent.' Beneath the centre 
is a small and quaint predella. The other, No. 
10, is a ' Deposition,' similarly treated, a rather 
smaller work ; the centre compartment of which I 
is flanked by some admirably painted Gothic i 
tracery containing six small and highly-finished ! 
scenes from the Passion in a brownish grisaille. ! 
Other subjects occupy the wings, which have 
figures in grisaille on their exterior. A small 
panel in the National Gallery, No. 714, is 
attributed to him. 

Lucas van Leiden (1494-1533) is the next 
great name in this school, known almost exclu- 
sively as an engraver. Nevertheless he executed 
some admirable work as a painter, examples of 
which are very rare. The chief is the * Last 
Judgment' at Leiden, No. 17 in the Stedelijk 
Gullery, hanging between the two pictures just 
described. It is a large and important altar-piece 



Erujel- 
herU'4. 



L. t'Tn 
Leiden. 



134 



THE BISE AND PROGRESS 



Sixteenth 
century, 

Jan 
SchoorL 



in three compartments. The colours light and 
bright, with little shadow; outlines firm and 
distinct ; the nude figures, which abound through- 
out, well drawn; positions, some easy, some 
affected ; all well finished. The subject occupies 
the three compartments. On the outer surfaces 
of these are two admirable figures, about three 
feet high, one of St. Peter, the other of St. Paul, 
drawn and painted in a broad and masterly style. 
There is a good example at the Stadel, Frank- 
fort, No. 70a, a 'Christ on the Cross;' and a 
* Madonna' is ascribed to him at Munich, No. 
743. 

Another painter of this time was Jan Schoorl 
of Utrecht (1495-1562), who spent much of his 
time in Italy, and was the master of Antonio 
Moro the Fleming. Two panels in the National 
Gallery, Nos. 20 and 21, are attributed to him. 
Two admirable portraits are Nos. 478 and 479 in 
the Hermitage; two others are Nos. 66 and 67, 
Salle II. 2"*^ etage, in the Belvedere Gallery at 
Vienna. His pupil, Martin Heemskerck, is re- 
presented at the Hermitage by a fine * Crucifixion,' 
No. 490. 

• About this epoch the painting of devotional 
subjects gradually ceased, while portraiture, 
especially in connection with the ancient guilds 
of Holland, and also scenes from domestic life, 
chiefly occupied the Dutch painters of the end 
of the sixteenth century and subsequently. But 
before considering these a brief notice must be 



OF PAINTING IN HOLLAND. 



135 



given to an artist of considerable merit, Comelis 
Comelisz, or Van Haarlem (1562-1638), who 
painted the nude figure with grace and apparently 
under the influence of Italian art. Two good 
examples are at the Hermitage, St. Petersburg 
— No. 505, a * Baptism,' and No. 506, a subject 
from the Decameron : one of his best is a ' Bath- 
sheba,' No. 734 at Berlin ; and two large pictures 
are Nos. 19 and 19 bis at the Hague. 

Of the great school of portrait-painters in 
Holland, Michiel van Mierevelt (1567-1641) and 
his pupil Paul Moreelse (1571-1638) were among 
the earliest. Examples of Mierevelt may be 
seen at the Trippenhuis, Amsterdam, particularly 
No. 209 and others. Several portraits are at the 
Hagua Four fine portraits exist at the Her- 
mitage, Nos. 740-743; and one of the Earl of 
Southampton should be noted in our National 
Portrait Gallery, South Kensington. An example 
of Moreelse, among others at Amsterdam, is the 
^Little Princess,' No. 229. Two good portraits 
are Nos. 744, 745 at the Hermitage ; one is at 
Dresden, No. 2424. Also Johannesvan Ravesteyn 
(1572-1657), a somewhat obscure artist of the 
Hague, who deserves to be better known than he 
appears to be, and who executed some important 
portraits in his time. The best of these are to be 
seen in the Musee de la Ville at the Hague, Nos. 
18, 22, 31. Works by him in galleries are rare. 
That of Munich contains two portraits, Nos. 182 
and 184 ; and that of Brussels two, Nos. 275 and 



Dutch por- 
traiture. 



Mierevelt. 



Moreelse. 



Savesteyn, 



136 



THE RISE AND PB0GBE8S 



Seventeenth 
century, 

Frans 
Hals. 



276. The Suennondt Collection at Berlin has 
a male portrait, unnumbered ; and one is ascribed 
to him at Dresden, Xo. 1106. 

Frans Hals (1584-1666) came next. His 
work can be seen and studied best at Haarlem, 
his native place, where in the Stadthuis are no 
less than eight very large examples of his 
vigorous and masterly style — most of them con- 
taining eleven or twelve figures. The paint- 
ing of some of these is slight, although at 
the same time so marvellously effective that 
they should be described rather as magnificent 
sketches. On the other hand, some of his work 
is highly finished ; as, for example, the beautiful 
picture of a girl, one among four single figures, 
to be seen at the Hof van Berestyn also at 
Haarlem. Three admirable paintings by Hals 
are in the Trippenhuis at Amsterdam, Nos. XX., 
113, 114, besides others in the Six and Van der 
Hoop Collections there, and a large work in the 
Stadthuis. Quite different from these is a small 
portrait of a Cavalier sitting, painted in a care- 
ful yet masterly manner, No. 416 in the Brussels 
Museimi. At Cassel are several examples, Nos. 
222 to 228 ; at Dresden four, Nos. 938 to 940 
and No. 2368, portraits ; in the Hermitage, St. 
Petersburg, are five, Nos. 770-774; and at 
Berlin five, of which Nos. 800 and 801 should be 
named. The Suermondt Collection there is rich 
in his works, of which Nos. 17, 18, 21 should be 
particularly noted. A fine full-length portrait 



OF PAINTING IN HOLLAND. 



137 



is No. 150 in the Liechtenstein Gallery, Vienna. 

The Stadel Museum, Frankfort, possesses a fine 

female portrait, No. 160, among others. In the 

La Caze Collection at the Louvre are two 

portraits, Nos. 65, 66 ; in the Louvre is one. No. 

190 ; in the National Gallery one, portrait of a 

woman, No. 1021 ; and at Hampton Court are 

two, not easily seen — one appears to be a small 

bold sketch of a man, No. 676 ; the other, hung 

high, the head of a boy laughing. No. 682, one 

of his favourite subjects. 

Contemporary with Frans Hals were two 

masters of portraiture who must be mentioned 

— ^namely, Daniel Mytens of the Hague (about 

1590-1656) and Thomas de Keyser, often called 

Theodore (about 1595-1660). Mytens was better 

known in England as a portrait-painter than in 

his own country. He worked here for some time 

in his capacity of court painter to Charles I., 

and was eventually superseded by Van Dyck. 

Among several examples of his work at Hampton 

Court, the portrait of James, Marquis of 

Hamilton, No. 44, may be noted. Thomas de 

Keyser executed some excellent small groups 

and single portraits. At the Hague, Nos. 61, 62, 

and in the Trippenhuis at Amsterdam, Nos. 177, 

178, 179, are good examples of both kinds. Our 

National Gallery possesses a fair specimen, a 

'Merchant and his Clerk,' No. 212. Two fine 

life-size portraits with others are in the Suer- 

mondt Collection, Berlin; at Darmstadt Nos. 



Mytens, 



Thomas de 
Keyser. 



138 



THE BI8E AND PB0GBES8 



F. Bol 



Van der 
Heist. 



356, 357 are good portraits ; and at Brussels Nos. 
424, 425 must be named. 

Following these in order of date are Rembrandt, 
Ferdinand Bol, Bartholomaus van der Heist, and 
Govert Flinck. Of the first named we shall speak 
presently. 

Two good specimens of Bol (1611-1681) are 
the portraits of Admiral de Renter and of him- 
self, Nos. 36 and 34 in the Trippenhuis at 
Amsterdam ; but his masterpiece is a large paint- 
ing, *The Four Regents,' in a room of the 
Stadthuis there. There are some good specimens 
in the Brussels Museum, Nos. 119, 120, 121, 122. 
In the Louvre are four portraits, of which No. 
41, ' A Mathematician,' is fine. In the National 
Gallery is a portrait. No. 679. But his best 
work is to be seen at the Hermitage, St. Peters- 
burg, where, among others, are no less than 
eight portraits of unusual excellence : Nos. 845, 
850 to 854, and 848, 849 should be noted. At 
Berlin No. 809 is a very fine female portrait. 
At Dresden are three compositions from sacred 
history, Nos. 1266, 1267, 1268. 

Van der Heist (1613-1670) is best seen in his 
fine picture in the Trippenhuis at Amsterdam of 
the ^Banquet of the Civic Guard,' No. 125 ; where 
also is an important group of the ' Arquebusiers,' 
No. 126, by him. A similar work in the Stadthuis 
is inferior. Equally fine are family groups of por- 
traits, life size, Nos. 777, 778, 779 at the Hermi- 
tage. Two good single portraits, Nos. 205, 206, 



OF PAINTING IN HOLLAND. 



189 



are at Brussels. In the Louvre is a beautiful 
specimen of finished work, *The Arquebusiers/ 
No. 197 — a small study for the well-known large 
work mentioned above — and some portraits. Our 
National Gallery contains one portrait of a lady 
by him. No. 140. 

(Jovert Flinck (1()15-1660) painted both m^k, 
portraits and historical works, and was a worthy 
pupil of Eembrandt, whose manner he success- 
fully adopted. A large but not unpleasing 
example of portraiture is the * Feast of the Civic 
Cvuard,' No. 93 in the Trippenhuis at Amsterdam ; 
where there is also one of his historical subjects, i 
• Isaac blessing Jacob,' No. 92. Another some- 
what similar is at Munich, No. 213 ; and good 
portraits may be seen in the Brussels Museum, 
No. 414, and in the Dresden Gallery, No. 1314. 
The Louvre contains two examples, Nos. 171, 
172. An interesting one of William of Orange 
as a boy, with Jacob Cats, is No. 842 at the 
Hermitage. 

The painting of still-life has also been one of j sm-Ufe. 
the most favourite occupations of the Dutch 
painter. In no other school has it been so much 
studied or accomplished so successfully. Its 
presence is not only always to be recognised in 
all genre subjects, but it forms the chief motive 
of an immense number of works, and the entire 
one in many. To the latter class belong the pro- 
ductions of the famous flower-painters, among | TheFioirer- 
whom may be named, in order of time, the De p<*^^^^s- 



140 



THE RISE AND PB0GBE8S 



De Heem. 



Kalf. 



Mignon. 



JR. Buy sell. 



Heems, Willem Kalf, Abraham Mignon, Rachel i 
Ruysch, and Van Huysum as the most distin- i\ 
guished. Johann David de Heem (1600-1674) S 
may be seen at the Hague, where there is a fine it 
specimen in the Gallery, No. 38. ' In the Trip- I 
penhuis at Amsterdam are two good works, Nos. i 
116, 117 ; in the Madrid Gallery No. 1391 is ) 
a fine example ; others are at Berlin and Vienna ; 
in the Hermitage are Nos. 1353, 1355, 1375 ; iu 
the Louvre are two, Nos. 192 and 193; and in 
the Brussels Museum there is one, No. 203, and 
also a fine work by Cornells de Heem, the 
brother. No. 418. Some superb studies of still- 
life by Kalf (1630-1693) exist, but are seldom 
met with. At Amsterdam there is one, No. 176 ; 
in the Louvre, No. 259 ; at Munich, No. 1384 ; at 
the Hermitage, No. 1369 ; at Dresden, No. 1454 — 
which are some of the best examples. Mignon 
(1639-1679) is to be seen in the Trippenhuis at 
Amsterdam, Nos. 221 and XXXIV., and in the 
Van der Hoop Collection, No. 77. Several are at 
Turin, where there is a very fine collection of the 
works of Dutch flower and fruit painters. Some 
of his choicest works are at Dresden, Nos. 1492, 
1493^ 1496, 1497, 1505; and two are at the 
Hermitage, Nos. 1358, 1359. Rachel Ruysch 
(1664^1750) has a lovely work, exquisite in finish, 
broad in effect, and lovely in colour, in the 
Hague Museum, No. 120. Another is at Amster- 
dam, No. 292. Examples are to be found at 
Munich, Dresden, Vienna, Berlin, Turin, and 



OF PAINTING IN HOLLAND. 



141 



several other galleries. By Jan van Huysum 
(1682—1749) there is a good example at Antiterp, 
Ifo. 427. In the Trippenhuis at Amsterdam is 
another. No. 164. In the Van der Hoop Museum, 
No. 57, and in the Van Loon Collection there are 
two admirable specimens. Two similar pieces are 
at the Hermitage, Nos. 1378, 1379. There are 
several in the Louvre, Nos. 231 to 240 ; and two 
in the National Gallery, Nos. 796 and 1001. 

Sesides these flower and fruit painters, there 
were in Holland equally talented painters of live 
or dead game ; such, for instance, were Melchior 
Hondecoeter (1636-1695) and Jan Weenix (1621- 
1660). The former was most successful in repre- 
sentations of domestic poultry and birds. Our 
National Gallery contains a good specimen. No. 
202; excellent also are Nos. 49 and 50 at the 
Hague^ Nos. 420 and 421 at Brussels, and Nos. 
1480 and 1481 at Dresden. But Hondecoeter*8 
finest work is in the Trippenhuis at Amsterdam, 
well known as the * Floating Feather,' No. 151. 
Nos. 144, 146, 147, and 150 there are all good 
examples. So are Nos. 1339, 1340, 1341 in the 
Hermitage. Jan Weenix (not to be confused with 
his father, Jan Battista Weenix, by whom there 
are works at Antwerp, in the Louvre, and at 
Dresden) was a most vigorous and truthful painter 
of dead game. He is well seen at Munich, par- 
ticularly in Nos. 217, 320, 332, 340, all splendidly 
executed. In his very best manner are Nos. 1347, 
1349, and 1348, particularly the last named, in 



Van 
Huysum. 



Painters of 
(jame and 
poultry. 



Honde- 
coeter. 



Jan 
Weenix, 



142 



THE BI8E AND PROGRESS 



Peasant 
life. 



Adrian 
Brouwer, 



the Hermitage, In our National Gallery No. 238 
is an excellent example. At the Hague there is 
a noble study of a dead swan, No. 173. In the 
Trippenhuis at Amsterdam, Nos. 375, 376, and 
377, and in the Galleries of Brussels, the Louvre, 
and Dresden there are several works by this 
master. 

The most characteristic form of Dutch art, 
however, is a species of genre, depicting, in a 
spirit of absolute realism without any compromise, 
scenes from the peasant life of the country. The 
subjects usually chosen are interiors of wayside 
inns, filled with figures mostly coarse and vulgar, 
who are drinking, smoking, playing cards, or 
perpetrating practical jokes. Sometimes it is 
a fete-day or fair, and the subject is transferred 
to the open air ; itinerant quacks, tap-boys, and 
dancing villagers, always rude and ungainly, 
occupy the scene. 

Adrian Brouwer of Haarlem (1608-1641) and 
Adrian van Ostade (1610-1685), both pupils of 
Frans Hals, were among the earliest represen- 
tatives of this form of art, which the two Teniers 
pursued with equal success. They must be 
classified with the Dutch school, for, although in 
a certain sense they should be regarded as Flem- 
ings, the school of Flanders is generally regarded 
as gradually merging after this time in that of 
Holland. 

Good examples of Adrian Brouwer are to be 
found in the Hague Gallery, No. 102; in the 



OF PAINTING IN HOLLAND. 



143 



AmBterdam Gallery, Nos. 51 and 52 ; and in the 

Uffizi at Florence, Nos. 955 and 959. Two such 

exist at the Hermitage, St. Petersburg, Nos. 937, 

941. Several others are at Munich and Dresden. 

One ifi No. 44 in the La Gaze Collection at the 

Liouvre. Of Adrian van Ostade two examples are 

in the Hague Museum, Nos. 106 and 107. At 

Amsterdam there are three good works in the Van 

der Hoop Gallery, one excellent specimen in the 

Van Loon Collection, another in the Six Gallery, 

and one in the Trippenhuis, a ^ Baker blowing his 

Horn,' No. XXXVIII. There is a good example 

in the Antwerp Museum, No. 466 ; one in the 

Brossels Museum, No. 259 ; and several others at 

Munich and Dresden. The Hermitage contains 

many, of which should be noted Nos. 945 to 954. 

In the Louvre are several, of which Nos. 369, 370, 

and 371 are excellent. One, No. 846, in the 

National Gallery is a good specimen. Li the 

Brossels Gallery there are also two works worthy 

of note by Isaac van Ostade the brother, Nos. 260 

and 433 ; and another good example by him occurs 

in the Trippenhuis at Amsterdam, No. 247. An 

important one is No. 962 at the Hermitage. In 

the Louvre are four works, Nos. 376 to 379 ; and 

three in the National Gallery, No. 963 being a 

good example. 

David Teniers, the elder (1582-1649), may be 
seen in the Hermitage, St. Petersburg, in the 
Hague Gallery, in the Royal Gallery at Dresden, 
and in the Belvedere at Vienna : see catalogues at 



A. van 
Ostade, 



I. van 
Ostade, 



D. Teniers, 
the elder. 



144 



TEE BISE AND PB0GBES8 



J). Tenters, 
the younger. 



the end of this volume. Our National Gallery pos- 
sesses three works by the elder Teniers, Nos. 949, 
950, and 951 in the Wynn-Ellis Collection. The 
works of the younger and greater Teniers may be 
found in the Trippenhuis at Amsterdam, where 
there are four fine examples, Nos. 327, 328, 
329, and 330 ; and in the Hague Gallery, Nos. 
223 and 224. In the gallery of the Steengracht 
family in the same town there is one of his most 
celebrated works, the 'Acts of Mercy.' In the 
Van der Hoop Museum at Amsterdam Nos. 116 
and 117 are good specimens ; as are also Nos. 449 
and 450 in the Royal Museum at Brussels. The 
National Gallery contains, among others, excellent 
examples — namely, Nos. 242,805, 862, remarkable 
for the finely-painted still-life ; No. 817, a good 
example of his favourite outdoor subject ; and four 
charming small pieces, Nos. 857-860. Numerous 
similar works are at Munich, No. 229 in par- 
ticular may be noted. At Dresden examples 
abound, among which Nos. 915, 919, 923, 928, and 
934 may be regarded as good and characteristic. 
The Hermitage, St. Petersburg, has the richest 
collection of these works in Europe. Here is his 
famous * Feast of the Archers and Halberdiers at 
Antwerp,' No. 672, supposed to be his master- 
piece : after this may be named the * Kitchen of 
his Chateau,' No. 699 ; the * Guard-room,' No. 
673, in which the armour and accoutrements are 
by Kessel ; the ' Kermesse,' twice, Nos. 674, 675 ; 
a' fine * Bridal Feast,' No. 677 ; the * Card- 



OF PAINTING IN HOLLAND. 



145 



players,* No. 688 ; a * House and Farmyard,' No. 
700, imusiially warm in tone ; and a rare subject, 
viz. a * Sea-piece and Ships,' No. 710, among 
fully thirty other works. A few good examples 
exist at Berlin. At Vienna should be noted the 
* Tir au Perroquet,' No. 51, Salle VI. 1^ ^age, a 
l€irge and important composition, among others, 
for which see catalogue. The Louvre contains 
several important examples, among them especi- 
ally Nos. 512, 513, 514, 518. A very fine work, 
the * Deliverance of St. Peter,' No. 117, is in the 
Lyons Museum ; and an equally good example is 
in the Musfe Fabre at Montpelier, No. 480 ; while 
at Madrid, among many inferior works, Nos. 1721, 
1724, 1732, 1744, and 1754 are really fine. 

After these Jan Steen (1626-1679) followed in 
the same line with remarkable humour and 
power of expressing it, both in feature and in 
gestures drawn with great truth, added to un- 
usual capacity as a painter. It must, however, be 
admitted that no genius or quality of workman- 
ship can excuse the vulgarity and coarseness 
displayed in some examples. The interiors of 
kitchens and small shops were often depicted for 
the display of utensils, vegetables, game, poultry, 
fish, &o., which could be introduced in any 
quantity for the purpose. These works are to be 
found in almost every gallery, and it is scarcely 
necessary to do more than name a few of the 
best as examples. Those most worthy of notice 
at the Hague are Nos. 138 and 139 : the former 



Jan Steen. 



146 



THE RISE AND PROGRESS 



an example of his family groups so often re- 
peated ; the second, known as * La Vie Humaine ' 
or as the * Oyster Feast/ is one of his finest pro- 
ductions. Among many in the Trippenhuis at 
Amsterdam are especially to be noted Nos. 321, 
322, and XLIX. Some examples are in the 
Van der Hoop Museum and the Six Collection 
there. Both at Antwerp and Brussels there are 
some of Steen's works, while in our National 
Gallery No. 856 is a good example, and in the 
Louvre at Paris there is another. No. 500. In 
the XJflfizi at Florence there is a fine work. No. 
977 ; and others aje at Munich, Nos. 842, 855 ; 
and at Dresden, Nos. 1463, 1464. One of his 
finest productions is in the Cassel Gallery, the 
* Bean-ifeast,' No. 576. At the Hermitage Nos. 
897, 898 may be noted, among others. An im- 
portant but curious work is the * Esther and 
Ahasuerus,' No. 895. 

It is to be observed that of aJl these masters 
but few fine examples have been given in illustra- 
tion, for it must always be borne in mind that 
the names of all of them have been applied in 
European galleries to numerous works which 
have no pretension to the honour claimed for 
them. Curious examples of this might be ad- 
duced in great abundance. 

Gerard van Honthorst (1592-1660) was one of 
the first Dutch masters to depict genre subjects, 
but, unlike the group of painters just considered, 
almost always on a scale of life-size. He is 



honthorst. 



OF PAINTING IN HOLLAND, 



147 



chiefly remarkable, however, for choosing effects 
illuminated by artificial light. Examples are 
* Christ before the High Priest,' No. 746 at the 
Hermitage, also No. 752, and several portraits. 
Two compositions may be named at Berlin, 
Nos. 807,824; another at Dresden, No. 1122; 
while a single portrait of William II. of Orange 
is No. 51 in the Gallery at the Hague. 

Another species of genre, peculiar to the 
Dutch school, is that which adopted the interiors 
of well-furnished houses, tenanted by women 
dressed in satin, silk, and fur, with cavaliers in 
the full dress of the time : a music lesson, or a 
doctor's visit, or a traveller's call and the offer 
of refreshment, &c., formed occasions for the most 
highly-finished studies of drapery, furniture, gletss, 
and other objects, with effects ef light and shade 
upon all, according to the taste of the painter. 

Gerhard Terburg (1608-1681) was one of the 
earliest as he was one of the most talented of 
this school. Gerhard Dow (1613-1675) and 
Gabriel Metsu (1615-after 1667) followed, each in 
his own manner, who again were succeeded by 
Nicholas Maas, Comelis Bega, Frans van Mieris, 
and others. Godfried Schalken cultivated the 
same subjects under effects of candlelight. 

By Terburg there are nuiiierous fine works: 
such are the ^ Guitar Lessen,' No. 864, and the 
well-known * Treaty of Miinster,' No. 896, both 
in our National Gallery, the latter presented 
by Sir Eichard Wallace. A beautiful example 



Lttxurious 
interiors. 



Terhurg. 



148 



THE RISE AND PBOQRESS 



is at Amsterdam, known as the * Conseil Patemel/ 
No. 331. Two somewhat similar are at Berlia, 
No. 791, and at Dresden, No. 1242. Another 
example is in the Hague Gallery called * The 
Despatch,' No. 144 ; where is also a small full- 
length portrait of himself, No. 145. The Trip- 
penhuis also contains two excellent portraits of 
himself and of his wife, Nos. LI. and LII. ; while 
other works are in the Six and Van Loon Collec- 
tions there. There are some charming specimens 
in the Louvre, Nos. 526, 527, 528 ; at Munich, Nos. 
243, 1062 ; and in the Uffizi at Florence, No. 
958. In the Lyons Gallery is a fine work by 
him. No. 115 ; in the Musee Fabre at Montpelier 
is another, No. 482; and again in the Cassel 
Gallery, Nos. 384, 385. The Hermitage, St. 
Petersburg, which is particularly rich in fine 
examples of the Dutch school, contains several of 
this master. The * Guitar Lesson,' No. 874, stands 
at the head of the list, followed by Nos. 872, 873, 
875, among others. The Suermondt Collection at 
Berlin possesses five good examples, Nos. 71-75. 
Two excellent full-lengths, small, are Nos. 562 
and 563 in the Liechtenstein Gallery at Vienna. 
Gerhard Dow's highly-finished small works 
are very numerous. One example is in the 
Uffizi, No. 786 ; another is in the Van der Hoop 
Gallery at Amsterdam, No. 30 ; while three well- 
known works are in the Trippenhuis, Nos. XIV., 
72, 74. But his finest production is perhaps that 
at the Hague, No. 28. Several capital examples 



C. Dow. 



Pieterde 
Hooghe. 



OF PAINTING IN HOLLAND. 149 



are in the Louvre — especially good are Nos. 121 
and 123 ; excellent specimens also are Kos. 125 
to 129 ; while in the Mus^e Fabre at Montpellier 
there is a good specimen, No. 131. A larger 
work in the same style is at Munich, No. 876. 
Works of high quality exist at the Hermitage : 
among many should be mentioned a very fine 
one, No. 903, and Nos. 904-907. Others are 
at Berlin. In the National Gallery are three, 
Nos. 192, 825, 968. At Dulwich are two genre 
pieces, Nos. 85 and 106. 

One man about this time was pre-eminent in 
a similar line, but with a motive higher than 
that of executing marvellous representations of 
textile fabrics by patient labour. Pieter de 
Hooghe, of whom it is only known that he worked 
between 1628 and 1671, painted interiors and 
courtyards with effects of light and shade of the 
most subtle kind, and produced successful results 
in colour and composition, attained to an equal 
degree perhaps by no other Dutch artist, Jan 
van der Meer of Delft excepted. Examples of 
De Hooghe's work should never be missed, or 
be passed without careful examination by the 
student. Our National Gallery, to begin with, 
possesses three of the finest of his productions, 
Nos. 794, 834, 835. In the Louvre are also two 
charming works, Nos. 223, 224. At Amsterdam, 
in the Trippenhuis, is a fine example known as 
the * Buttery Hatch,* No. 158. In the Van der 
Hoop Museum Nos. 49, 50, 51, 52, 53 must be 



150 



THE BI8E AND PBOGRESS 



Vander 
Meer of 
Delft 



noted : the two last named are especially admir- 
able. A fair specimen is in the Six Collection, 
and another in the Van Loon Gallery. In the 
Pinacothek at Munich there is one example, No. 
1122 ; and the Rathhaus at Nurnberg possesses 
an excellent work. Three interesting pictures, 
but not equal to his finest, are in the Hermitage, 
Nos. 860^861,862. But the greatest work perhaps 
of this master is an interior, of larger size than 
usual, superbly lighted by warm sunlight, with- 
out a number, in the Berlin Museum. 

Not less admirable are the few existing works 
by that gifted master Jan van der Meer, or 
Yermeer, of Delft, regarding whose history and 
surroundings little is now known, although there 
is no doubt that pictures by him were greatly 
esteemed by his Dutch contemporaries. Van der 
Meer's works are very scarce and are rarely met 
with in public galleries, but deserve the closest 
attention. In vigour and truth ha excelled 
Pieter de Hooghe, while in style of composition 
and in chiaro-oscuro there is much resemblance 
between them. First at the Hague there is a 
*View of Delft,* No. 72, taken from outside 
the town, with its red-biick buildings reflected 
in the canal. The drawing for this work is in 
the Frankfort Museum. In the Six Collection, 
No. 511 Heerengracht, Amsterdam, there are 
two splendid works by him. One is an open- 
air scene in Delft with marvellous strength and 
purity of colour, broken nevertheless by a 



OF PAINTINa IN HOLLAND. 151 

variety of tints. The other is an interior with a 
woman pouring out milk, most simply yet most 
forcibly presented. In the Van der Hoop 
Museum there is a less powerful but charming 
work, No. 129. Two are in the Dresden Gallery, 
Nos. 1432, 1433 ; the former of these, painted 
when he was twenty-four years of age, is ex- 
tremely interesting, as being the only known 
work in which the figures are life-size. The 
Queen possesses a very fine interior, a * Woman 
playing on a Harpsichord,' recently shown at one 
of the Exhibitions of Old Masters at Burlington 
House. A remarkable composition of *Dead 
Grame,* highly finished and admirable in colour, 
is attributed to this painter by Dr. Waagen at 
the Hermitage, where it is No. 1338 ; a living 
* Cat and Dog * are very inferior to the rest. In 
the Suermondt Collection, recently acquired by 
the Berlin Museum, are three very interesting 
examples : a * Boy blowing Bubbles in a Court- 
yard,' No. 68 ; a * Cottage with Trees and Figures,' 
No. 69; and a *Girl dressing before a Glass,' 
No. 70. The Louvre has just acquired a small 
but beautiful work, at present without a number : 
it is a ^ Girl making Lace,' and is near the 
farther end of the long gallery on the left. 

Gabriel Metsu (1615-after 1667), one of the Metsu. 
most attractive painters of this class, executed 
many highly-finished and genersdly small works. 
Our National Gallery contains two good speci- 
mens, the * Music Lesson/ No, 839, and the *Duet/ 



152 



THE RISE AND PB0GBE88 



No. 838. In the Louvre are several good works : 
the best is a ' Cavalier receiving a Young Lady,' 
No. 293; while the small gallery at Montpellier 
contains two good works, Nos. 327, 328. At 
Brussels, in the Museum, No. 239; at Amsterdam, 
in the Trippenhuis, Nos. 206, 207 ; and in the 
Hague Gallery, No. 74 should be noted. Other 
excellent examples are Nos. 68 and 69 in the Van 
der Hoop Museum at Amsterdam, two in the Van 
Loon Collection there, Nos. 1305 to 1311 inclu- 
sive at Dresden, and No. 9 in the Cabinet Vert 
at Vienna. One fine work by Metsu is in the 
Gallery at Hesse-Cassel, No. 448. None are 
finer than the three at the Hermitage, Nos. 878, 
880, 881. The rarity of a life-size portrait by 
this painter makes it necessary to mention No. 
77 in the Suermondt Collection at Berlin. 
N.Maas. Nicholas Maas of Dordrecht was a pupil of 

Eembrandt, whose influence is frequently indi- 
cated by the strong effects of chiaro-oscuro which 
mark the genre subjects treated by him. In 
our National Gallery the * Cradle,' No. 153, 
the * Dutch Housewife,' No. 159, and the * Idle 
Servant,' No. 207, illustrate his work well. 
Elsewhere some of the more important works 
of Maas are in the Brussels Museum, No. 232 ; 
in the Louvre, No. 276 ; in the La Caze Collec- 
tion at the Louvre, a good one. No. 78 ; and in 
the Munich Pinacothek, two portraits, Nos. 190, 
191, The Steengracht Collection at the Hague 
possesses one. In the Trippenhuis at Amsterdam 



OF PAINTINO IN HOLLAND, 



153 



there are two, Nos. 203 and XXXI., and in the 
Six and Van Loon Collections the same, while in 
the Van der Hoop Gallery No. 66 is a good 
example. There are two at the Hermitage, of 
which the finer is No. 857. At Berlin he is 
represented by a life-size figure, the 'Philosopher,' 
No. 819. 

A few of the chief followers of these masters 
can only be mentioned. Comelis Bega of Haar- 
lem (1620-1664) executed some excellent works 
somewhat in the style of Gerhard Dow, but re- 
markable for low tones of colour. Such, for 
example, is No. 19 in the Trippenhuis, Amster- 
dam; No. 7 in the Van der Hoop Gallery; Nos. 
886, 969, 986 in the Uffizi at Florence ; and No. 
13 in the Louvre. Two admirable interiors are 
Nos. 970, 971 at the Hermitage. Three good 
examples are at Berlin, and two at Frankfort, 
Nos. 227, 228. Next in chronological order is 
Frans van Mieris of Leiden (1635-1681) the 
elder, so called to distinguish him from a grand- 
son, also named Frans. The elder Frans painted 
some excellent interiors with figures very much 
in the manner of his master, G. Dow, and was 
followed by his son Willem van Mieris, who 
painted in the father's style. In the hands of 
the younger Frans the manner was repeated, but 
more feebly. Hence pictures of very diflerent 
quality with the name of Mieris attached are 
nimierous in most European galleries, especially 
in the Dutch, Louvre, Munich, Berlin, Dresden, 



C. Bega, 



Van Mieris. 



154 



THE BI8E AND PROGRESS 



Van Slinge' 
land and 
Dusart. 



St. Petersburg, and UflSzi Galleries ; for which 
Netscher, see Catalogues at the end of the volume. Gaspar 
Netscher (1639-1684), bom at Heidelberg, painted 
in a smooth and highly-finished style, and 
executed some excellent small portraits: Nos. 
242, 243 in the Trippenhuis, Amsterdam, are 
good examples of his work. Two interiors, Nos. 
358, 359, are in the Louvre ; three fine portraits 
are in the Hermitage, Nos. 882-884 ; other good 
works are at Dresden, of which the best are Nos. 
1527, 1530-32 ; and, among others in the National 
Gallery, the best is No. 843, * Boys . blowing 
Bubbles.' Pieter van Slingeland and Comelis 
Dusart were worthy followers respectively of 
Dow and Ostade. Good examples of both are 
in the Trippenhuis at Amsterdam and at Dresden, 
but a very fine work by Dusart is in the Six Col- 
lection at Amsterdam. Slingeland is represented 
in the Louvre by No. 486, a * Dutch Family.' 
The works of that clever portrayer of candlelight, 
Godfried Schalken, must be remembered. Thev 
are often met with ; perhaps that in the Hague 
Gallery, No. 128, is one of the best. Another of 
his finest is No. 923 at the Hermitage. Good 
examples are Nos. 1565 and 1566 at Dresden. La 
the Louvre he is represented, among others, by a 
* Holy Family,' No. 478, and a candlelight 
subject. No. 480. In the National Gallery the 
best are Nos. 997 and 999. His well-known 
portrait of William III. of Orange, by candle- 
light, is No. 424 in the Darmstadt Gallery. The 



Schalken, 



OF PAINTING IN HOLLAND, 



155 



last of these masters of genre was Adrian van der 
Werff, whose small works are characterised by an 
exaggerated smoothness which has the effect of 
painting on china. Pictures of a higher quality, 
however, exist at the Hermitage and at Munich ; 
these are larger than those just referred to, and 
are unquestionably productions of great beauty : 
such are Nos. 984, 986, 987, besides others, in 
the first-named gallery ; while in the second an 
entire cabinet is devoted to the master. Others 
are at Amsterdam, the Hague, Dresden, and 
several are in the Louvre. 

But we must not delay longer to speak of the 
great master of the Dutch school, who differs 
from all others, and who is pre-eminent by his 
wonderful and diverse talents — ^namely, Kembrandt 
van Eyn of Leiden (1607-1669). The first char- 
acteristic of his style is his mode of distributing 
the light and shade of the composition. A strong 
light illuminates the central object, whether a 
figure or group, while all the rest is bathed in 
deep warm shadow, relieved only by faint second- 
ary radiations from the centre light. This system 
constitutes essentially his style, and it pervades 
equally the large paintings, his portraits, his 
small highly-finished pictures, and his etched 
works, which are so numerous and so well known. 

The earliest work of Bembrandt was minutely 
finished, yet it exhibited the same breadth and 
chiaro-osouro as that of his later period, which was 
marked by more free and masterly handling, A 



Van der 
Werff. 



Rembrandt, 



156 



TEE RISE AND PR0GBES8 



remarkable example of the former is the * Simeon 
in the Temple,' No. 114 in the Hague Museum, 
a canvas of small size, painted when he was 
twenty-four years of age. Similar examples 
are the * Woman taken in Adultery,' No. 45 
in our National Gallery; and the * Angel Baphael 
leaving Tobias,' No. 404, the * Pilgrims of Em- 
maus,' No. 407, a * Philosopher in Meditation,' 
No. 408, and a * Cottage Interior,' No. 410, all 
in the Louvre. Belonging to this group should 
be noted the * Parable of the Labourers,' No. 798, 
among others, at the Hermitage; also, though 
quite different in subject, the * Rape of Proserpine,' 
a remarkable work. No. 823 at Berlin. A very 
beautiful work is a * Descent from the Cross,' No. 
849 in the Pinacothek at Munich, forming* part 
of a series here of six scenes from the life of 
Christ. But another work on a larger scale with 
numerous figures, but intermediate in size between 
these and the next class, is the * Descent from 
the Cross,' No. 800 in the Hermitage, St. Peters- 
burg, in which the body of Christ is beautifully 
illuminated by a torch, screened by a cap from 
the spectator. At Dresden two specimens of 
Old Testament subjects of large size are to be 
seen, Nos. 1217, 1220. At St. Petersburg, in the 
Hermitage, which has by far the best and lai> 
gest collection of Bembrandt's works in Europe, 
there is a * Sacrifice of Isaac,' one of the finest 
of this class. No. 792; also the * Abraham 
entertaining Angels/ No. 791, the 'Eeturn of 



OF PAINTING IN HOLLAND. 157 



the Prodigal/ No. 797, both of the highest rank, 
and two less admirable, the 'Coat of many 
Colours,' No. 793, and the 'Denial of Peter,' 
No. 799. At Berlin * Moses breaking the Tables 
of the Law,' No. 811, a * Samson and his Father- 
in-law,' No. 802, and in the Cassel Museum * Jacob 
blessing Ephraim and Manasseh,' No. 367, must 
be noted. So also should the frequently repeated 
'Bathsheba,' No. 116 in the Hague, and again in 
the Steengracht Collection there. At the Her- 
mitage is a *Holy Family,' No. 796, consisting 
of an admirably painted Dutch interior with 
peasants, and an infant in a cradle in the fore- 
ground. In all this work it must be remembered 
that, although these sacred subjects abound in 
anachronisms of dress and other local incidents, 
and are besides replete with Dutch type and cha- 
racter, adhesion to archaeological truth was not 
at this period regarded as any part of a painter's 
duty. 

Of the large works painted in Eembrandt's 
more matured but still early style one of the 
very finest, dated 1632, is the famous ^Lesson 
in Anatomy,' No. 115 at the Hague — a picture 
in which tiie light seems almost to proceed 
from the canvas itself, and so admirable is 
the management of it, and so perfect is the 
composition, that for these qualities alone it de- 
serves a careful study. The celebrated so-called 
* Bonde de Nuit,* nevertheless a full daylight sub- 
ject» No. 295 in the Trippenhuis at Amsterdam, 



158 



TBE RISE AND PBQGBES8 



was painted in a larger manner in 1642. There 
also. No. 294, is the splendid group of the 
* Syndics/ painted in 1661 in the same manner, 
than which it is difficult to conceive a more per- 
fectly painted group of portraiture. A masterly 
production in the Van der Hoop Museum, Amster- 
dam, No. 95, known as the * Betrothed Jewess,' 
is believed to be his last work. 

Eembrandt attempted a life-size * Danae,* and 
produced a grand composition, rich in colour and 
in magnificent accessories ; but the figure is, as 
might be expected, short and without grace, 
coarsely conceived and executed : it is No. 802 
at the Hermitage. 

His single portraits were very numerous, almost 
always life-size. There are many of himself at 
various periods of his life : far example, two are in 
our Natic«ial Gallery, Nos. 221, 672 ; and, among 
other excellent heads, there are several in the 
long gallery of the Louvre, Nos. 412, 413, 414, 
415, and others. An admirable one is in the 
Hague Museum, No. 118. Another, painted in 
1637, is No. 811 at the Hermitage. 

Eembrandt's full-length portraits of Mr. Dacy 
and his wife, in the Van Loon Collection, are 
magnificent works, in the finest preservation. 
Very grand also are the half-lengths of the Bur- 
gomaster Six and his mother, still in the Six 
house, 511 Heerengracht, Amsterdam. A fine 
composition in his best manner is the portrait 
of himself, with his wife, at Dresden, No. 1225. 



OF PAINTING IN HOLLAND, 



159 



Portraits abound also in the gallery at Hesse- 
Cassel, where are no less than twelve excellent 
specimens, of which Nos. 347, 356, his first wife 
when young, 359, 364 are very fine, and a noble 
full-length portrait. No. 371. 

Equally good are the portraits of Govert Flinck 
and of his wife, Nos. 323, 329 in the Pinacothek, 
Munich ; several excellent examples are at 
Vienna, the best that of his mother. No. 39, 
Salle I. 1®' etage ; and there is a fine work at 
Madrid, a representation of his wife as Queen 
Artemisia, No. 1544. Many portraits exist in the 
Dresden Gallery ; most admirable is that of his 
wife holding a pink in her hand : others will be 
found in the catalogue. In the Dulwich Gallery 
the portrait of his servant-maid. No. 206, and 
the so-called portrait of Philip Wouwerman, No. 
282, are admirable. Our National Gallery pos- 
sesses the well-known and marvellous portrait 
of an old lady in a white cap and ruff. No. 775, 
besides other examples, Nos. 190, 237, 243, 850. 

Bembrandt occasionally, but very rarely, painted 
small heads in a more fijiished manner: a beautiful 
example of a man in a velvet cap on a panel less 
than a foot square is in the little Museum at 
Innspruck ; another similar in size is in the Turin 
Gallery, No. 382; and a third at Dulwich, No. 
189. His finest small portraits are at the Hermi- 
tage ; his mother, No. 807, is a perfect gem for 
finish and colour, and no less perfect is that of 
his wife, fastening an earring, No. 817. Two of the 



160 



THE BI8E AND PROGRESS 



Eeckhout, 



same size are attributed to the master in the 
Antwerp Gallery, Nos. 294, 295, but are much 
inferior, as also is one in the Louvre, No. 418. 

Eembrandt painted a few landscapes in a broad 
style, with dark effects, but we are unable to re- 
collect an example in any public gallery, with 
the exception of Cassel, where Nos. 353 and 354 
should be observed, No. 1232 at Dresden, a 
specimen of small merit. No. 830 at the Hermi- 
tage, a * Jacob's Dream,' No. 179 at Dulwich, and 
our National Gallery, which has one. No. 72. 

The pupil who most nearly approached Eem- 
brandt in feeling and general effect was Gerbrandt 
van der Eeckhout, or Eckhout (1621-1674). 
His works are frequently met with in public 
galleries, but only a few can be enumerated. 
Single examples are to be seen at the Hague, 
No. 36; at Amsterdam, in the Trippenhuis, 
No. 89, and in the Van der Hoop Museum, No. 
36 ; at Dresden, No. 1397 ; at Vienna, No. 49, 
Salle IL V^ 6tage ; and at the Louvre, No. 158 ; 
while at Munich there are two specimens, Nos. 
204, 871 ; and at the Hermitage four, Nos. 753, 
837, 838, 840. At Berlin are three pictures by 
him, Nos. 804, 820, and 829. At the Darmstadt 
Gallery there are two good portraits, Nos. 386 
and 387. 

Having noticed thus far the chief Dutch masters 
of portraiture, still-life, genre, and historical paint- 
ing, we have yet to consider another important 
group — ^namely, the landscape-painters. One of 



Landscape- 
painters. 



OF PAINTING IN HOLLAND. 161 



the earliest and best of those who studied land- 
scape for its own sake, and not merely as an 
accessory, was Albert Cuyp of Dordrecht, whose (hyp. 
power of reproducing certain charming atmosphe- 
ric effects is undoubted. Our National Gallery 
contains excellent works, Nos. 53, 960 : so also 
does the Dulwich Gallery, where Nos. 163, 169, 
239 may be noted. There is one in the Trippen- 
huis. No. 65 ; in the Van der Hoop Collection 
one, No. 29; and in the Six Gallery there are 
two beautiful works by him, one a moonlight 
scene — all at Amsterdam. An admirable land- 
scape with cows, No. 104, is at the Louvre. 
Sometimes Cuyp depicted poultry, cattle, &c. ; 
as in the National Museum at Brussels, No. 
180, in the Trippenhuis, No. 66, in the Lyons 
Museum, No. 212, and in the Munich Pina- 
cothek, No. 1035. Sometimes he introduced 
figures and horses into his open-air scenes; as 
in Nos. 105 and 106 in the Louvre, No. 21 
at the Hague, and No. 2355 at Dresden. At the 
Hermitage there are good small examples of cows 
and horses, Nos. 1101, 1104, 1105, 1107 ; a ' Sea- 
piece with Boats,' No. 1102; and a* Moonlight 
at Sea,' No. 1106. Cuyp painted some excellent 
portraits also. One is in our National Gallery, 
No. 797. Others are in the Louvre, Nos. 107, 108. 

Jan and Andries Both, who generally worked Both, 
together, were also very successful in rendering 
the warmth and glow of summer sunlight in their 
Italian landscapes. In the Trippenhuis No. 42 

M 



162 



THE BI8E AND PROGRESS 



Van Goyen. 



Wynants, 



is the best example; in the Van der Hoop 
Museum No. 20 is one of their finest works ; 
while at the Hague there are two, Nos. 17, 18. 
Good examples are in the Louvre, particularly 
No. 43 ; in our National Gallery, at Dulwich, 
Munich, and Dresden ; and to be noticed as fine 
works are No. 26 in the Antwerp Museum, Nos. 
42 and VIII. in Amsterdam Gallery, and No. 124 
in the Brussels Museum. In most of these the 
landscape is by Jan, and the figures are by 
Andries. While the Boths chose their subjects 
from Italy, Van Goyen executed many charming 
views of his native canals, generally of a tender 
grey tone and misty atmosphere. Such are Nos. 
XVII. and 103 in the Amsterdam Gallery, No. 
173a at Frankfort, and No. 1378 in the Munich 
Gallery. Other works are to be seen in the Louvre, 
at Berlin, at the Hermitage, and at Dresden. 

Three Dutch landscape-painters, who were inti- 
mately connected in their works, may be con- 
sidered at the same time. These are Jan Wynants 
and his two pupils, Philip Wouwerman and Adrian 
van de Velde. Wynants chiefly executed small 
and carefully finished landscapes. Among others 
at Munich Nos. 809, 319, 1118 are the best; 
and at the Hermitage Nos. 1112 to 1116. An 
excellent small work is in the Amsterdam 
Museum, No. 398, and similar examples are Nos. 
350, 351, 352 in the Brussels Museum, while 
No. 455 there is in a larger style. Three fine 
specimens are in the Louvre, Nos. 579, 580, 581, — 



OF PAINTING IN HOLLAND, 



16S 



Woutoer^ 
man. 



in the first two the figures are by Adrian van de 
Velde ; and a good one is No. 198 at Frankfort. In 
oar National Gallery are two excellent small land- 
scapes, Nos. 971, 972 ; and at Dulwich Nos. 11, 12. 
Philip Wonwerman was a clever painter of 
groups of horsemen, and his subjects were formed 
for the purpose of introducing them. Accordingly 
battles and himtiug-pieces were favourite pro- 
ductions. His landscape was often admirable, and 
was sometimes not merely subservient to the 
figures, but formed the motive of the work. The 
pictures are generally of small size and highly 
finished, but a far greater number than he could 
possibly have painted are catalogued under his 
name in European galleries. Many of these must 
have been the work either of his two brothers, 
Pieter and Jan Wouwerman, or of some more 
obscure followers, who copied the originals with or 
without slight alteration to supply the demand for 
such works. For instance, at Dresden alone sixty 
pictures are given to Philip, at Munich seventeen 
are attributed to him, and in the Hermitage at 
St. Petersburg no less than fifty, and so on in 
most other galleries. It is impossible to notice 
all the best examples of Wouwerman's work, but 
a few may be mentioned. First, in the Trippen- 
huis at Amsterdam, Nos. 391, 392, 394, 395 are 
excellent ; so also are two large ones in the Six 
Collection and one in the Van Loon. Some good 
pictures are at the Hague, Nos. 184, 185, 186, 188; 
in the Louvre, Nos. 565, 567, 570; and in our 

H 2 



164 



THE RISE AND PB0GBES8 



Adrian van 
de Velde. 



Berchem, 



National Gallery, Nos. 878, 880, 976. Among 
several at Munich the * Stag-hunt,' No. 208, 
must be noted. At the Hermitage, St. Petersburg, 
the finest are Nos. 995, 998, 1006, 1021, 1027, 
1034, although many others might be noticed, for 
which see catalogues at the end. At Dresden, 
among several, Nos. 1368 and 1375 are the best. 

Adriaji van de Velde executed many excel- 
lent works, both in landscape and figures. In 
the Trippenhuis at Amsterdam are two fibae 
examples, Na 359 and No. 360, admirably 
painted. In the Hague Museum No. 165 may be 
noted ; and one of the most perfect small works 
of the master is in the Six Collection at Amster- 
dam : there is also a larger one in the Van Loon 
Gallery; and in the Van der Hoop Museum may 
be seen an excellent work, No. 121. Other good 
examples are in our National Ga,llery, at Dulwich, 
in the Louvre, in .the Suermondt, Berlin, in the 
Hermitage, and at Dresden. 

Two landscape-painters of this time, whose 
works are always highly finished, though too 
often wanting in interest, were Nicholas Berchem 
and his pupil Karel du Jardin. They both 
visited Italy and painted chiefly small Italian 
landscapes, introducing figures and cattle. Several 
good examples of Berchem are in the Amster- 
dam Gallery, especially so is No. 26. Eemark- 
ably fine works exist in the Hermitage, and in 
great number; for example, Nos. 1070 to 1084 
inclusive. Numerous works are at Dresden, also 



Jardin, 



Potter, 



OF PAINTING IN HOLLAND, 165 

in the Louvre at Paris, for which see catalogues. 
By Karel du Jardin there is a large work, No. 169 K- du 
at Amsterdam, much inferior to some smaller 
specimens, such as Nos. XXVI., 167, 171. Both 
masters are well represented at the Hague, in 
the Louvre, in the National Gallery, in the 
Dulwich Gallery, and indeed at most others. 

Li striking contrast to these somewhat con- Paul 
ventional painters is the young and vigorous 
Paul Potter, whose admirable studies of animals 
gained for him a place among the best Dutch 
masters of this period. Everybody knows the 
famous * Young Bull ' of life-size in the Hague 
Grallery, No. Ill; but his smaller works, such 
as No. 113 there for instance, are we think 
fitr more deserving of admiration. In the 
Trippenhuis at Amsterdam are some excellent 
examples of the master's power in landscape, 
Nos. 260, 261, 263, 264 ; and in the Vaa der Hoop 
Museum are two small works, Nos. 90 and 91. In 
quite another style is a large equestrian portrait 
by him of Professor Tulp in the Six Collection. 
The Louvre contains four good works, Nos. 399 
and 400, and two without numbers ; the Munich 
Gallery one excellent specimen, No. 1103; and 
the National Gallery possesses two, one forming 
part of the Peel Collection, and one of the Wynn- 
Ellis, Nos. 849 and 1009. At St. Petersburg are 
many works, of which should be noted, a * Land- 
scape and Animals,' No. 1051, perhaps his finest 
work, although not large ; another * Landscape,' 



166 



THE RISE AND PROGRESS 



Ruysdael. 
Ifobbema. 



No. 1056; a noble *Dog and Kennel/ No. ]055; 
a small 'Bull/ No. 1057; and a remarkable 
picture in several compartments and highly 
finished, the * History of a Hunter and his Dogs/ 
No. 1059 : the hunter is successful at first, but is 
at last taken by the animals, tried before the ele* 
phant and lion, condemned, and executed by the 
bear, while the dogs are hanged. In the Suermondt 
Collection at Berlin is a picture of marvellous 
finish, unnumbered, of a wood with hunters. 

During the middle and end of the seventeenth 
century two most important landscape-painters 
flourished in Holland — namely, Jacob Buysdael 
of Haarlem and his pupil Meinder Hobbema. 
These were more truly masters of landscape pro» 
per than any of the painters already mentioned. 
Buysdael sought scenes of more stirring char- 
acter than the flats of Holland afforded, and 
found in Norway the waterfalls and rocks which 
form so many of his subjects. Hobbema's 
forest scenes are remarkable, equally with those 
of his master, for patient labour and careful 
rendering of the foliage and other details. 
Buysdael's works are usually colder and more 
sombre in tone than those of Hobbema, whose 
somewhat greater warmth of colour gives addi- 
tional charms to his landscape : which is moreover 
less conventional, and studied from nature under 
more varied aspects. Many of their best works 
are now in private collections, but a sufiSoient 
number of admirable examples are to be found in 



OF PAINTING IN HOLLAND. 167 



public museums to illustrate their styles. In our 
National Gallery there are fine specimens of both, 
especially a * Landscape in Showery Weather/ No. 
685, and the admirable * Avenue Middelhamis/No. 
830, by Hobbema ; while by Ruysdael two must 
be noted, Nos. 627 and 854. The Brussels Gallery 
possesses a very important landscape, No. 296, by 
Buysdael, in which the figures are by Adrian 
van de Velde, and also a fine work of Hobbema, 
No. 419. In the Trippenhuis at Amsterdam 
there is a choice specimen, the * W ater-mill,' No. 
24, by Hobbema ; and by Euysdael Nos. 145 and 
288 are characteristic, but Nos. XLII. and 44 
are beautiful small works. Landscapes by both 
masters are to be seen in the Van der Hoop and 
Six Galleries there. The Belvedere at Vienna 
contains good works also — by Hobbema No. 57, 
Salle 11. 1®' ^tage; and by Ruysdael Nos. 6, 
29, and 36 in the same room. At Dresden, 
among many by Ruysdael, No. 1436, known as 
the * Hunt,' No. 14b7, known as the * Jews' Ceme- 
tery,' and No. 1443, known as the * Monastery,' 
are all excellent examples. A number of Ruys- 
dael's finest works are at the Hermitage : among 
them may be mentioned Nos. 1136, 1139, 1143, 
1148. As exceptional examples of very small 
work and high finish, very rarely met with, are 
two in the fcjuermondt Collection, Berlin — No. 
86, a distant town with small details in the fore- 
ground; and No. 89, a landscape. At Munich 
again we fibad works by both painters — a land* 



168 



THE BI8E AND PB0QBE88 



De Koning. 



Van der 
Neer, 



scape with a charming distance by Hobbema, No. 
1036 ; and numerous works by Euysdael, of which 
Nos. 1038 and 1045 are the best. The Louvre 
possesses several works by Euysdael — note Nos. 
470, 472, and 473 ; and one by Hobbema, No. 206. 

Philip de Koning of Amsterdam was an excel- 
lent painter of distant and extensive landscape. 
He is well represented at Amsterdam in the Trip- 
penhuis by two works, Nos. 182 and XXVIII. ; 
and also in our National Gallery by two good 
examples, Nos. 836, 974. 

This brief notice of Dutch landscape-painters 
cannot be closed without a mention of such men 
as Artus van der Neer of Gorcum, the painter 
par excellence of moonlight scenes : see Van der 
Hoop Museum, Amsterdam Museum, the Her- 
mitage, where there are no less than nine fine 
examples, Berlin Museum, Brussels Museum,. and 
our National Gallery. Lastly must be named 
Jan van der Heyden, also of Gorcum, the faith- 
ful portrayer of Dutch streets with their red- 
brick houses bordering on the canals, — see the 
Louvre, National Gallery, the Hague, Amsterdam, 
Van Loon, and the Hermitage for examples, — and 
the two Dutch painters, Adam Pynacker and 
Lingelbach, of whom it is only possible to say 
that they both studied for some time in Rome, 
and also frequently painted the figures in the 
landscapes of other Dutch masters. For examples 
of their work, see the Hague, Amsterdam, the 
Hermitage, the Dulwich Gallery, and the Louvre. 



Van der 
Ileyden, 



Pynacker, 
Lingelbach. 



OF PAINTING IN HOLLAND. 



169 



It only now remains to speak of the Dutch 
marine-painters, of whom but three rose to the 
first rank. These were Ludolf Backhuizen, 
Willem van de Velde, called the younger to 
distinguish him from his father, a painter of the 
same name, and Jan van de Capelle. There 
are five works by Backhuizen in our National 
Gallery — two are important, Nos. 204, 818. At 
Amsterdam is a fine ^Embarcation of Jan de 
Witt,' No. 5, and in the Six Collection there is 
a remarkable painting of a boat tossing on the 
sea in a storm. He is well represented in the 
Belvedere at Vienna, in the Munich Gallery, 
No. 230, and in the Louvre at Paris. Willem 
van de Velde usually chose to render the sea 
under its calm and peaceful aspects, and his 
works are clearer and lighter in tone than those 
of Backhuizen. Such a ' Calm ' is No. 168 at the 
Hague ; and two in our National Gallery, respec- 
tively a * Calm ' and a ' Storm,' Nos. 149 and 150, 
are excellent specimens. In the Amsterdam 
Museum Nos. 356 and 357 are small examples, 
and No. 358 is very large. In the Van der Hoop 
Gallery there Nos. 124 and 127 must be noticed. 
In the Gallery of the Louvre No. 542 is an 
excellent work. Van de Capelle is nowhere better 
seen than in our National Gallery, where Nos. 964 
and 965 are the best. A fine example, unnum- 
bered, is in the Suermondt Collection at Berlin. 

The Dutch school is remarkable for the great 
number of artists who, within the limit of its scope. 



Marine- 
painters, 



Backhuizen, 



Willem van 
de Velde, 



Van de 
Capelle, 



170 THE BI8E AND PBOGBESS 

attained a certain amount of celebrity, and whose 
works are found in the museums not only of 
Holland, but scattered about the Continent. 
The value of work which consisted mainly in 
copying the pictures of the first Dutch masters, 
or in reproducing their style in pieces somewhat 
varied from the originals, whether in still-life, 
domestic scenes, or landscape, is not suflScient 
to make the citation of illustrative examples 
necessary. 

A few names, however, of the best of these 
" little Dutch masters " may be appended, and 
their dates are given in the following table, while 
illustrative examples of their work will be found 
by reference to the catalogues at the end of this 
volume. 

In portraiture the following may be noted : 
Comelis Jansden, Michael van Musscher, Adrian 
van der Venne. 

In genre the following : Poelenburg, Bloemart, 
Uchterveld, E. van der Poel, Moucheron, David 
Eyckaert, Brekelenkamp, Hoogstraten, Salomon 
Koning, A. de Vois. 

Landscape, marine, architectural, &c. : Dirk 
van Deelen, Eackaert, Emanuel de Witte, Job 
Berckheyden, Gerrit Berckheyden, Dierick Stoop, 
Hugtenburg, H. C. Vroom, Van Everdingen, 
Hoeckgeest, Hendrik van Vliet, H. van Steenwyk 
(father and son), A. Waterloo, Swanevelt, Simon 
de Vlieger, Pieter van Laer. 

Still-life, &c. : Jan van Os, Willem van Aelst. 



OF PAINTING IN HOLLAND. 



ni 



A TABLE 
Or THE Dates of the Pbikoipal Paxntebs of the Dutch School. 



SchooL 




Birth. 


Death. 


Haarlem . . 


Albert van Ouwater . , , 
Gerhard or Geerrit van 
Haarlem, or of St. Jans 


■ 1 
1 No date known, but 
1 probably about the 
j middle of the 15th 

1 a 






\ century. 




Leiden . . 


Gomelis Engelbertsz . . . 


1468 


1533 


Leiden . . 


Lucas van Leiden . . . 


1494 


1533 


Utrecht . . 


Jan Schoorel, or Schoorl . . 


1495 


1562 


Haarlem . . 


Martin vaa Heemskerck . . 


1498 


1574 


Haarlem . . 


Gomel is van Haarlem . . 


1562 


1638 


Haarlem . . 


Heudrik Vroom .... 


1566 


1640 


Delft . : . 


Michael Janszoon, Van Miere- 








velt 


1567 


1641 


Amsterdam . 


Abraham Bloemart, about . 


1567 


1647 


Utrecht . . 


Paul Moreelse .... 


1571 


1638 


Hague . . 


Johannes van Ravesteyn 


1572 


1657 




Hendrik van Steenwyk, about 


1580 


1648 


Antwerp . 


David Teniers the elder . . 


158;2 


1649 


Haarlem . . 


Fraiis Hals . . . 




1584 


1666 


Utrecht . . 


Gornelis van Poelenburg 




1586 


1667 


Delft . . . 


Adrian van der Venue 




1589 


1662 


Utrecht . . 


Gerard van Honthorst 




1592 


1660 


Hague . 


Daniel My teas, about 




1590 


1656 . 


Amsterdam . 


Thomas de Keyser (often ] 


mis- 








called Theodore) 




1595? 


1659 


Amsterdam . 


Gomelis Jaussen . . 




1595? 


1665 1 


Leiden . 


Jan van Goyen . , 




1596 


1656 


Utrecht . . 


♦ Jan David de Heem 




1600 


1674 


Haarlem . . 


Jan Wynants, about . . 




1600 


1677 


Botterdam . 


Simon de Vlieger, about . 




1604 


— 


Dordrecht . 


Albert Cuyp . . . , 




1605 


1691 


Delft . . . 


Hendrik Vliet, about . 




1605 


1661 


Leiden . . 


Kembrandt van Byn . 




1606 


1669 




Emanuel de Witte . . 




1607 


1692 


Haarlem . . 


Adrian Brouwer . . . 




1608 


• 1640 



* There are three others of this name and fiunily, bat inferior to the above. 



172 



THE BI8E AND PROGRESS 



SchooL 




Birth. 


Death. 


Haarlem . . 


Gerhard Terburg .... 


1608 


1681 


Amsterdam . 


Salomon Koning .... 


1609 


1668 


Utrecht . . 


Jan Both and Andries Both, 








about . ' 


1610 


1656' 


Antwerp . . 


David Teniers the younger . 


1610 


1694 


Haarlem . • 


Adrian van Ostade . . . 


1610 


1685 


Dordrecht 


Dirk Stoop, about. 


1610 


1688 


Amsterdam . 


Ferdinand Bol 


1611 


1681 


Haarlem • . 


Bartholom'aus van der Heist . 


1613 


1670 


Haarlem . • 


Pieter van Laer .... 


1613 


1673 


Leiden . 


Gerhard Dow , . . . . 


1613 


1675 


Amsterdam . 


GovertPlinck 


1615 


1660 


Leiden . . 


G^abriel Metsu, about . . . 


1615 


1667 


Haarlem . 


Isaak van Ostade. 


1617 


1671 


Haarlem . . 


Philip Wouwerman . . . 


1619 


1668 


Amsterdam . 


Artus van der Neer . . . 


1619 


1683 


Amsterdam . 


Philip de Koning .... 


1619 


1689 


Haarlem . . 


Gornelis Bega 


1620 


1664 


Delft . . . 


Willem van Aelst , , . 


1620 


1679 


Amsterdam . 


Jan Battista Weenix . . . 


1621 


1660 


Delft . . . 


Adam I^nacker .... 


1621 


1673 


Amsterdam . 


Gerbrandt van der Eckhout . 


1621 


1674 


Alkmaar . . 


Aldert van Everdingen . . 


1621 


1675 


Utrecht . . 


Gornelis de Heem .... 


1623 


— 


Rotterdam . 


E. van der Poel, painted 








1646-54 


— 


~- 


Haarlem . . 


Nicholas Berchem . . . 


1624 


1683 


Amsterdam . 


Paul Potter 


1625 


1654 


Haarlem . . 


Jacob Buysdael .... 


1625 


1681 


Amsterdam . 


Jan Lingelbach .... 


1625 


1687 


Leiden . . 


Jan Steen 


1626 


1679 


Dordrecht . 


Samuel van Hoogstraten . . 


1627 


1678 




Pieter de Hooghe .... 


1628? 


1671 


Amsterdam . 


Karl Dujardin 


1630 


1678 


Amsterdam . 


Willem Kalf 


1630 


1693 


Haarlem . . 


Job Berckheyden .... 


1630 


1698 


Amsterdam . 


Ludolf Backhuizen . . . 


1631 


1709 


Dort . . . 


Nicholas Maas, or Maes . . 


1632 


1693 


Delft . . . 


Jan van der Meer .... 


1632 


1695 


Amsterdam . 


Prederik Moucheron . . . 


1633 


1686 


Amsterdam . 


Willem van de Velde 


1633 


1707 


Amsterdam . 


Jan van de Capelle . . . 


1635 


— 


Leiden . . 


Frans van Mieris .... 


1635 . 


1681 


Utrecht . 


Melchior Hondecoeter . . 


1636 


1695 


Amsterdam . 


Jan Hackfl^rt, about . . . 


1636 


1708 



OF PAINTING IN HOLLAND. 



178 



School. 








Birth. 


Death. 


Amsterdam . 


Jan van der Hevden . . . 




1637 


1712 


Haarlem . . 


Gerrit Berckheyden . . 






1638 


1693 




Meinder Hobbema 






1638 


1709 


Amsterdam . 


Adrian van de Velde . . 






1639 


1672 


Utrecht . . 


Abraham Mignon . . . 






1639 


1679 


Hague . . 


Gaspard Netscher . 






1639 


1684 


Leiden . . 


Pieter van Slingeland 






1H40 


1691 


Ijeiden . • 


Adrian de Vois, about 






1641 


1698 


Alkmaar 


Dirk van Deelen, 17th century 


r 




— 




Brekelenkamp, 17th century. 






— 


Dort . . . 


Godfried Schalken . . . 




1643 


1706 


Amsterdam . 


Jan Weenix .... 






1644 


1719 


Rotterdam . 


Michael van Musscher 






1645 


1705 


Haarlem . . 


Jan van Hugtenburg . 






1646 


1733 


Botterdam . 


Adrian van der Werff 






1651 


1722 . 


Haarlem . . 


Gornelis Dusart . . . 






1660 


1704 


Leiden . . 


Willem van Miens • . 






1662 


1747 


Amsterdam . 


Bachel Buysch .... 






1664 


1750 


Amsterdam . 


Jan van Huysum . . 






1682 


1749 


Leiden . . 


Fransvan Mieristhe younger 


1689 


1763 


Hague . . 


Jan van Os 


1744 


1808 



174 



THE BISE AND PBOGBESS 



Fourteenth 
century, 

WUhelm 
von K6ln, 



THE RISE AND PROGRESS OF PAINTI]^G IN 

GERMANY. 

There was an early period in the history of 
German art when, although its efforts were at 
first rude and uncouth, it was unaffected by 
foreign influences, and soon developed estimable 
qualities of its own. A taste for pictorial re- 
presentation was manifest in the Ehenish pro- 
vinces, and a school was established of which 
the centre was Cologne. Certain records have 
been found there of one Wilhelm von Koln — 
the earliest notice of his existenoe appearing 
soon after the middle of the fourteenth century 
(13o8) — who appears to have been greatly es- 
teemed, and who was appointed painter to the 
city. Many productions of this early Ehenish 
school are attributed to him — among them two 
pictures now in the Museum Wallraf-Richartz 
at Cologne — and with probability, but not 
perhaps with absolute certainty. There is more 
proof, however, to connect his name with some 
slight remains of frescoes in the Cologne Eath- 
haus, and now in the same museum. The two 
pictures referred to are Nos. 40 and 41, a small 
triptych, * Virgin and Child,' and a large and 
fine work, * Christ on the Cross, Mary, and eight 



OF PAINTING IN OEBMANT, 



175 



Apostles.' The heads are remarkable for being 
finely modelled from natural types ; the extremi- 
ties are less finished; the limbs of Christ, of 
extreme tenuity. The head of each saint has an 
elaborately painted aureola bearing his name. 
The work, like that of the early Cologne school 
generally, is marked by softness of contour, blend- 
ing of light and shade, and high finish in the 
features and hair. Another of these rare works is 
No. 160 in the Museum of Darmstadt, a votive 
picture in five parts; where also are several 
examples of the school : see catalogue. 

The next prominent name is that of Stephan 
Loethener, or Lochner, or "Master Stephen," 
who came from Constance to Cologne, and took 
up his abode there in 1442. The important 
painting, a large triptych, of the * Adoration of 
the Magi,' known as the *Dombild,' in the 
Cologne Cathedral, unquestionably a very fine 
work, is believed to be an authentic masterpiece 
of Loethener, and shows a decided advance on 
the work of Wilhelm in regard to the realistic 
treatment of the subject. Another example by 
him is a small picture of the ^Madonna and 
Child of the Eosary,' No. 118, among others, in 
the Cologne Museum. Another is ascribed to him 
at Darmstadt, No. 168. After this the school 
declined notably for some time, until the in- 
fluence of the great Flemish advance in art under 
the Van Eycks and Rogier van der Weyden made 
itseK largely felt here as elsewhere. The earliest 



Fifteenth 

century. 

Loethener, 



176 



THE BISE AND PBOGBESS 



The Master 
of the 
Lyversherg 
^Passion.* 



Master of 
Liesbom, 



Master of 
the ^ Death 
of the 
Virgin,* 



signs of this influence in different parts of Ger- 
many may be traced in several works of the 
period (end of the fifteenth and beginning of 
the sixteenth century), some of which have been 
attributed, although without foundation, to Israel 
von Meckenen, who was an engraver, but almost 
certainly was not a painter. Among others, a 
large composition, formerly in the Lyversberg 
Gallery at Cologne, and now in the museum 
there, is no longer attributed to Meckenen, but 
to a painter unknown, and hence referred to as 
the " Master of the Lyversberg * Passion.' " The 
series consists of eight fine panels, Nos. 151 to 
158, well preserved, fall of interesting detail, 
quAintness of character, and painted with a finish 
and colour which illustrate the influence of the 
Van Eyeks. Catalogued under the same name is 
a * Presentation in the Temple,' No. 706 in the 
National Gallery. Other examples — namely, six 
panels, portions of an altar-piece, Nos. 613 to 
618— are at Munich. Some excellent works 
belonging to a master, name unknown, were 
executed for the Monastery of Liesbom, West- 
phalia, in the latter half of the fifteenth century. 
He is spoken of therefore as the "Master of 
Liesbom," and two panels by him may be seen 
in the National Gallery, Nos. 260, 261, each of 
three saints, originally forming part of the 
Liesbom altar-piece, which was his chief work. 

Another master obtains distinction from a 
triptych of the ' Death of the Virgin,' No. 207 in 



OF PAINTING IN GEBMANY. 



177 



the Cologne Museum, a highly-interesting picture, 
painted early in the fifteenth century. Other fine 
illustrations of the Cologne school, by artists of 
great merit, whose names are unknown, are Nos. 
159 and 199. A beautiful example by the Master 
of the * Death of the Virgin' is a triptych, No. 578 
at Berlin ; another is No. 5, Salle II. 2^ 6tage, 
at the Belvedere, Vienna; while an altar-piece 
exists at Frankfort, No. 99. 

The old cities of Colmar, Ulm, and Augsburg 
were at about this period centres of a school of 
art recognised as the Swabian, which received 
Flemish influence through the Cologne school. 
The earliest important painter at Colmar was 
Martin Schongauer, or Schon, born 1420, who 
studied imder Van der Weyden„ and thus ul- 
timately carried Flemish feeling, through his 
pupil Wohlgemuth, into the future Niimberg 
school. Some fine paintings by Schongauer exist : 
the * Madonna ' in St. Martin's Church at Colmar is 
generally regarded as his masterpiece. The * Death 
of the Virgin ' in our National Gallery, No. 658, 
is also a remarkable example of this master. 
Several works at Darmstadt are ascribed to him, 
of which Nos. 217 and 218 should be noted. 

At Ulm a worthy representative of the school 
was Bartholomaus Zeitblom, some of whose best 
works are in the Stuttgart Museum — viz. parts 
of an altar-piece, &c., Nos. 421 to 427, and others : 
of which No. 422 is the ' Visitation ' (date 1496). 
(See also the catalogue at the end of the volume.) 



SchoTigauer, 



Zeitblom, 



178 



THE BISE AND PROGRESS 



Sixteenth 
century. 



The predella of the altar-piece is in the Berlin 
Museum, No. 606a ; where also are the two panels 
' St. Peter ' and ' St. Anne,' Nos. 561a and 561b. 
He may be studied in the Moritz-kapelle at 
Nurnberg, Nos. 58 and 65. An excellent work, 
in four panels of large size, is the ' History of St. 
Valentine ' at the Augsburg Gallery, Nos. 79 to 82. 
There are four works also in the Cathedral there. 
One also at Darmstadt is No. 223, a * St. Lawrence.' 

At Augsburg this school commences with the 
Holbeins, who lived and flourished as painters 
during three generations. Of the first it is un- 
necessary to speak in detail, the second and third 
alone being famous as " Holbein the elder " and 
" Holbein the younger." The former, who was 
bom 1460, executed some good pictures in the 
manner of the school, several examples of which 
are in the Museum at Augsburg, the three 
principal being altar-pieces, Nos. 25 to 27, Nos. 
84 to 86, and Nos. 683 to 685. Four other 
works are in the Cathedral there. There are 
(Examples also at tlie Munich Gallery, in the 
Salle I.— note Nos. 5, 8, 9, 14, 15, 19, 20, 41, 
42, 47, 48, 53, 54, 59, 60, all parts of one altar- 
piece. At the Stadel Institution, Frankfort, 
there is a series of seven panels relating to the 
Passion, Nos. 76-82. 

But the style attained its highest perfection 
in the works of Hans Holbein the younger, born 
1495, one of the greatest painters Germany has 
produced. Until lately an altar-piece of four 



ffolbein the 
elder. 



Holbein the 
younger. 



OT FAINTING IN GEEMANT. 179 

sides, painted in 1512 — the two inner ^with St. 
Ulrich and St. WoKgang, and the * Death of 
St. Catharine;' the outer a * Martyrdom of St. 
Peter' and a* Madonna' — in the Augsburg Gallery, 
Nos. 673-676, was regarded as his earliest 
known work ; but some critics are in favour of 
ascribing it to the father, whose work it certainly 
resembles. But the younger Holbein painted 
soon after this date an altar-piece, the finer 
part of which, a *St. Sebastian,' is in the 
Finacothek at Munich, No. 17; the remainder 
was at Augsburg, but is juow removed to Munich 
also. He next settled in Basle, where in the 
Gallery are preserved some important early 
portraits : among them one of Amerbach, painted 
in 1519; one of himseK; others pf his wife amd 
two children on one panel ; and a life-size study 
of a corpse as a * Dead Christ.' There also are 
his well-known scenes from the Passion, ten in 
number: seven similar scenes are in the British 
Museum, in black and white. During his resi- 
dence at Basle he most probably, executed the 
drawings for the well-known wood engravings of 
the * Dance of Death,' a series of compositions 
remarkable for powerful conception of the subjectr 
a nearly complete set may be seen in the British. 
Museum. At the same time he executed the waHi 
paintings in the Town Hall of Basle, of which 
scarcely any traces remain. Later still, when 
Holbein was about thirty years of age, was 
painted one of his finest devotional pictures, the 

N 2 ' 



180 



TEE BI8E AND PR0GBE88 



Holbein the 
younger. 



'Madonna' of the Burgomaster Meyer, now in 
the Royal Palace of Darmstadt. This work, 
although less generally known than the popular 
and beautiful copy at the Dresden Museum, No. 
1809, is far superior to the latter, which, since 
the Holbein Exhibition at that city a few years 
ago, is acknowledged not to be from the master's 
hand. The picture at Darmstadt is free from 
the uniform dlill red tint of the Dresden work, 
is full of varied colour, has more light and 
shade, finer modelling, and the expression of the 
figure is more perfectly rendered.* About 1526 it 
appears that Holbein first visited England, where 
he soon became attached to the court of Henry 
Vin., and where he spent most of the remain- 
ing seventeen years of his life. Here he 
worked chiefly in portraiture, in which branch of 
art he was a master of the first rank, as the 
exquisitely finished portraits by him in many 
European galleries and in numerous English 
mansions testify. It may be said indeed that he 
founded a school of portraiture, marked by a 
thoroughly studied understanding of the sitter's 
character, and by earnest work in the present- 
ment of its traits both physical and mental. The 
following list of examples may be noted : 

While no work of Holbein exists in the 
National Gallery, many are attributed to him at 

* The writer had the adyantage of making a carefal exami- 
nation of the two pictures, with a very few days' interval between 
I eaoh. 



OF PAINTING IN OERMANY, 181 



Hampton Conrt, nearly twenty according to the 
oatalogue, of which some six or seven may be 
genuine — mostly early works : such are the pair of 
panels 'Probenius' the printer, No. 603, and 
'Erasmus,' No. 597; the portrait of Erasmus 
writing, No. 594, and those of his father and 
mother on one pemel. No. 608. There is a fine 
collection of crayon portraits, nearly ninety in 
number, in her Majesty's collection at Windsor, 
chiefly of personages of the court of Henry VIII. 
The so-called picture of the * Barber Surgeons ' 
at the Boyal College of Surgeons, LondoD, is a 
copy, the original having been destroyed. A 
fine small early portrait of a young man in red is 
No. 226 in the Darmstadt Gallery; and -another 
early example is a portrait, No. 83 in the Stadel 
Gullery at Frankfort. The Louvre is very rich 
in portraits : * fine examples are the renowned 
portokits of Erasmus, No. 208, Nicholas Kratzer, 
No. 206, Archbishop Warham, No. 207, Sir 
Thomas More, No. 210, Anne of Cleves, No. 211, 
and Sir Bichard Southwell, No. 212 (a replica of 
one at the Uffizi, No. 765) ; at the Hague the 
admirable likeness of Cheseman, falconer to 
Henry VIII., No. 238 ; at Dresden that splendid 
example of the goldsmith Morrett, No. 1810 ; 
a notable one, among others which are doubtful, 
at the Museum of Berlin, is the magnificent half- 
length of George Gyzen, No. 586, with details 
marvellously executed ; at the Belvedere, Vienna, 
the portrait, among others, of the physician 



182 



THE BlSh ANT) PR0GBE88 



Burgkmair, 



Chambers, No. 62 ; of a young man, unnamed, 
No. 85, and the splendidly executed Jane Sey- 
mour, No.. 61 in SaUe I. 2"^ ^tage. 

Augsburg also produced about this time, besides 
the Holbeins, two worthy artists, Hans Burgkmair 
and Christopher Amberger. The former executed 
numerous woodcuts, the best known being the 
* Triumph of the Emperor Maximilian.' Many 
paintings by him are in the Munich Gallery: 
among them a fine * St. John at Patmos,* No. 
65. At Dresden is an altar-piece. No. 1739. At 
Vienna the * Life and Passion of Christ,' a most 
elaborate and comprehensive work, containing, 
besides the centre-piece, a * Crucifixion,* no less 
than 156 small scenes from the gospel narratives : 
it is No. 50, Salle I. 2**^ etage. Several examples 
in the Augsburg Gallery, of which the best are 
Nos. 19-22 and 24 ; and others are at the Moritz- 
kapelle at Niimberg. Amberger distinguished 
himself as a portrait-painter in the manner of 



Amberger, 



Holbein. Two fine examples axe attributed to 
him in the Berlin Gallery — ^portraits of Charles 
the Fifth and of Sebastian Miinster, Nos. 556 
and 583; another is No. 84 at Frankfort; other 
worits are at Amberg. There is a beautiful 
altar-piece by him in a chapel at the east end 
of the Cathedral at Augsburg. One portrait, that 
of Henry VIII., in the Gallery at Augsburg, 
long assigned to him, has recently been given to 
B. Beham, and denied to be a portrait of the 
English king : see catalogue. 



OF PAINTING IN GERMANY. 



183 



A third and very able portrait-painter of this 
period may be considered here, viz. Bartholomaus 
Bruyn, of Cologne (1492-1556). Examples of 
his work in portraiture are to be found at Berlin, 
No, 588 ; at Frankfort, Nos. 101, 102, 103 ; at 
Cologne, No. 356 ; at Brussels, Nos. 4, 5 ; and in 
the Hermitage, St. Petersburg, Nos. 470, 471 — all 
admirable productions. 

Mean whUe, besides the Swabian, another equally 
important school, which has been termed the 
Franconian, took its rise in the picturesque 
old city of Numberg, already the home of Adam 
Kraft and Peter Vischer, men famous in the 
history of German plastic art. The master- 
spirit of this school was Albrecht Diirer, but 
before considering his work we may first notice 
the productions of his master, Michael Wohl- 
gemuth. Most of these are characterised by 
warmth and brightness of colour, by forms and 
features which are unpleasing, often repulsive, 
and by action which in some cases is almost 
grotesque. In illustration may be named the 
five compositions by him, including a famous 
'Crucifixion,* Nos. 22, 27, 28, 34, 39 in the 
Pinacothek at Munich, and a fine triptych in the 
Frauenkirche at Numberg. 

Albrecht Diirer (1471-1528) studied under 
Wohlgemuth for three years, and then travelled 
abroad before he finally settled as a painter 
and an engraver in Niirnberg in 1494. His 
most important works, however, the number of 



Bruyn, 



Wohlge- 
muth, 



A. Durer. 



184 THE RISE AND PROGRESS 



which testify to his great activity, were executed 
after a visit to North Italy in 1506. Belonging 
to the earliest period of his life is a series of 
woodcut designs illustrative of the Kevelation of 
St. John ; after this he painted the portrait of 
his father, No. 720, and that of himseK, No. 716 
(at thirty years of age), now in the Pinacothek 
at Munich. Another early portrait of his father 
is No. 87 at the Stadel, Frankfort. At a some- 
what later period he executed the beautiful 
' Adoration of the Kings,* No. 1141, in the Tribune 
of the UflSzi at Florence, and the equally fine 
* Feast of Boses ' at a monastery in Prague. At 
the Belvedere, Vienna, there are two very large 
compositions of the master full of delicately 
finished figures — namely, the * Martyrdom of 
Christians in Persia,' No. 15, and a representa- 
tion of the * Trinity surrounded by Angels,' No. 
18, Salle I. 2"^^ etage, a work demanding much 
patient labour for its accomplishment. Into 
both these works Dtirer has introduced his own 
portrait ; and in the latter there is some beautiful 
landscape beneath. At Dresden may be seen a 
fine * Christ on the Cross,* No. 1722a, dated 
1500. Belonging to a later period is a * Ma- 
donna,' No. 851, in the UflBzi at Florence ; where 
e2dsts also a fine portrait of himself at twenty- 
six years of age. No. 434, of which there is an 
equally good repetition at Madrid, No. 1316. 
Many of his most famous portraits were painted 
about this time ; for example, the well-known head 



OF PAINTING IN GERMANY. 185 



of his fiiend Pirkheimer, that of Wohlgemuth at 
llimich. No. 731, and those of the Baumgartners, 
Nob. 1 and 3 in the Munich Pinacothek. Another 
fine example is No. 29, Salle I. 2^^ 6tage, at 
Vienna. The National Gallery has one portrait 
only. No. 245, the bust of a senator. Two grand 
fdll-length figures of Charlemagne and Sigismund 
are hung in the Eathhaus, Niimberg. Then 
there is a magnificently painted head of an earlier 
date, an 'Ecce Homo/ No. 102 in the Moritz- 
kapelle of that city. At Madrid also are two 
fine single figures of Adam and Eve, Nos. 1314 
and 1315, which illustrate his work of the 
middle period. Among his most celebrated and 
his latest works are the two panels contain- 
ing life-size full-lengths of the Apostles ^St. 
John and St. Peter,' *St. Paul and St. Mark,* 
Nos. 71 and 76 in the Pinacothek at Munich. 
They are dignified figures, painted in a broad 
style, and in this particular differ from his earlier 
and more minutely finished pictures. 

But Durer*s powers are also equally displayed 
in numerous engravings and woodcuts, some of 
which rank among his best productions. Such 
are the two series of woodcuts of the ' Great and 
Little Passion,' the * Life of the Virgin,' the well- 
known engravings of the ^ Knight of Death,' the 
'Melancholy,' and others. Also must be men- 
tioned the prayer-book decorated by him for the 
Emperor Maximilian, now in the Boyal Library 
at Munich. 



186 



THE RISE AND PBOGRESS 



The 
Behams, 



Pencz, 



Lucas 
Craivach, 



Albrecht Diirer had several followers in Nurn- 
Aitdorfer, berg : the chief of these was Albrecht Altdorfer, 
who subsequently became influenced by Italian 
art. He executed some altar-pieces, of which a 
fine example is that, Nos. 47 to 51, at the 
Gallery at Augsburg, essentially German in its 
feeling and manner. After Altdorfer were the 
two Behams, Hans Sebald and Bartholomaus ; 
and George Pencz. The first executed engrav- 
ings; but there are two good pictures by B. 
Beham in the Pinacothek at Munich, Nos. 72 
and 98; and one at the Augsburg Gallery, No. 
696. An example. No. 435 in the Gallery at 
Stuttgart, * St. Benedict in a Landscape,' must 
be noted. Three small and well-modelled por- 
traits are attributed to him in the Museum of 
the Hague, Nos. 231, 232, 233, of which No. 232 
appears to be the best: there are repetitions 
of Nos. 232 and 233 in the Gallery at Brussels. 
A curious work by Hans Sebald Beham is the 
* History of David/ No. 14 at the Louvre, 
mounted as the top of a table. Pencz w£ls an 
excellent portrait-painter in the style of Diirer. 
An example exists in the Uffizi, Florence, No. 
436 ; two are at Vienna, Nos. 54 and 58, Salle I. 
2^^ ^tage ; and three others are at Berlin, Nos. 
582, 585, and 587. 

The most gifted of Albrecht Diirer's pupils was 
certainly Lucas Cranach (1472-1553), or properly 
Lucas Sunder, who established a school of paint- 
ing in Saxony, and was appointed court painter. 



I 



OF FAINTING IN GERMANY. 187 



He executed several important works, chiefly 
altar-pieces: for example, one in a church at 
Behneeberg ; another in the Meissen Cathedral ; 
and at Weimar a third, into which Cranach 
has introduced his own portrait, as well as that 
of Luther, for whom he had a great veneration. 
Many of Cranach's smaller works exist, some of 
which, although bearing his name, were partly 
executed by his pupils. A *Holy Family' in 
the Palazzo Sciarra at Eome is probably by 
Cranach himself. Besides these compositions, he 
delighted in painting the nude figure direct from 
the model, which apparently was not always 
selected for its beauty. For this purpose he 
chose the subject of Adam and Eve, several 
representations of which are to be seen in Euro- 
pean galleries. The best perhaps are those in 
the Tribune of the TJflBzi at Florence, Nos. 1138, 
1142, while some others are very imcouth. 
Several of this order are at Berlin. A better 
figure than usual is that of a * Venus with Cupid,* 
of life-size. No. 461 in the Hermitage, St. Peters- 
burg ; there also is a good * Madonna and Child 
under an Apple-tree,' No. 459, with several 
portraits. The Munich Gallery possesses some 
of his best productions, both small and large: 
of the former a * Madonna,' No. 734, and an 
*Adam and Eve,* No. 729, and of the latter 
the * Woman taken in Adultery,' No. 56, may 
be mentioned among others. The Gallery at 
Dresden contains a large number of Cr^aoh*s 



188 



THE RISE AND PBOGltESS 



Cranach 

the 

younger. 



works ; two compositions, from Scripture subjects, 
important although small, are * Pharaoh's Host 
destroyed in the Red Sea,* No. 13, and a * Sacri- 
fice of Isaac,' No. 15, in the Augsburg Gallery ; 
while Cranach's skill as a portrait-painter is 
manifested by the portraits of Luther and of the 
Elector of Saxony, repeated at Paris, Florence, 
Munich, Vienna, and Dresden. There is one 
small portrait in the National Gallery, No. 291 ; 
and there are two good ones at Darmstadt, Nos. 
244 and 248. 

Cranach had one son of the same name, called 
" the younger," some of whose paintings are to be 
seen at Vienna : among them is No. 71, Salle I. 
2"** etage, * Christ appearing to the Holy Women.* 
One large work is at Berlin. A good portrait 
of Frederick III. of Saxony is No. 251 at the 
Darmstadt Gallery. But after the elder Cranach 
the Saxon school gradually decayed. No other 
names of importance appear during the sixteenth 
century in the history of painting in Germany ; 
and it was not until the seventeenth century that 
some more or less worthy representatives appeared 
in the persons of Bottenhammer, Elzheimer, 
Sandrart, and Eoos, among others who belonged 
to that period; while Balthasar Denner, Christian 
Dietrich, Baphael Mengs, and Angelica Eaufmann 
flourished in the eighteenth century. 

Of the first-named group, Johann Botten- 
hammer (1564-1623) painted works of very vary- 
ing 8126 and quality, chiefly religious^ some 



Seventeenth 
century. 



Rotten' 
hammer^ 



OF PAINTING IN GERMANY. 



189 



Elzheimer, 



Sandrart, 



mythological. He is best seen at Munich and 
Vienna ; while our National Gallery contains one 
small example. No, 659, with a background 
painted by Velvet Brueghel, a combination not 
uncommon. Two good small examples are at 
the Hermitage, Nos. 510 and 511 ; and one is at 
the Louvre, No. 424. 

Adam Elzheimer painted chiefly in Italy, 
where he was known as Adamo Tedesco. His 
subjects were landscapes, often illuminated by 
artificial light, or moonlight scenes. Examples 
of the former are in the Louvre, No. 159, and in 
our National Gallery, No. 1014. Others are at 
Munich and Vienna. 

Joachim von Sandrart painted few pictures 
worthy of note, but was the author of a voluminous 
work on the history of art. There are paintings 
by him at Munioh and Vienna, and a portrait 
in the Amsterdam Museum. 

Johann Heinrich Boos was an animal-painter 
of note in the latter half of the century, and his 
works may be found in most continental galleries. 

Commencing with the eighteenth century 
group, Denner, who was the earliest of these (1685- 
1749), was most celebrated as a portrait-painter. 
He worked in a minute style, reproducing every 
peculiarity of the sitter with the greatest faith- 
fulness, and thereby sacrificing breadth of execu- 
tion and grace of form. Characteristic examples 
of Denner's work are Nos. 767 and 779 in the 
Munich Gallery, No. 117 in the Louvre, and there 



Soos, 



Eighteenth 
century, 

Denner, 



190 



THE RISE AND PROGRESS 



Dietrich. 



Raphael 
Mengs. 



are others at Dresden. Several examples are at 
the Hermitage : see catalogue. 

Christian Dietrich (1712-1774) was a painter 
of' marvellous fertility and varied powers. He 
lived principally at Dresden, and executed a large 
number of works, mostly copies of old masters, 
chiefly Dutch, in which he a-chieved a greater suc- 
cess than as an original painter. In our National 
Gallery the * Itinerant Musicians,' No. 205, is a 
good example ; but at Dresden there are no less 
than fifty-one works by him, painted expressly 
for the King Augustus III. in virtue of his 
appointment as court painter ; and several others 
are at the Hermitage. 

Anton Eaphael Mengs (1728-1778) was one 
of the best painters of his time. He began to 
study his art at a very early age, his father 
taking him to Dresden first, and then to Eome, 
for that purpose. He spent much of his after life 
in Eome, occasionally travelling back to Saxony 
and paying a visit to SpaiQ, at both of which 
courts he held appointments. Most of his best 
works are now to be found at Madrid. The large 
* Apotheosis of Trajan' decorates the dining- 
room of the Eoyal Palace there ; and his master- 
piece, an ' Adoration of the Shepherds,' No. 1435, 
with several other works, is in the Museo at 
Madrid. He is also well represented at the 
Hermitage : the best being a large * Judgment 
of Paris,' No. 1302, with several others, including 
his own portrait, for which see catalogue. His 



OF PAINTING IN GERMANY. 



191 



Angelica 
Kaufmann, 



own portrait occurs twice — once in the Uffizi, 
No. 555, and again at Munich, No. 153. A 
large representation of * Apollo and the Muses ' 
in the Villa Albani at Rome is a good example 
of the master's fresco-painting. 

Angelica Eaufmann (1742-1 808) gained a wide- 
spread reputation in her lifetime, chiefly as a 
portrait-painter. She went to study chiefly in 
Italy, and came subsequently to England, where 
she was made one of the thirty-six original 
members of the Eoyal Academy, so highly was 
she esteemed here. Her works showed no origi- 
nality, nor any great power of execution, and, 
while sometimes graceful, were generally weak 
and insipid. Her own portrait may be seen in 
our National Portrait G^U^ry, S. Kensington, at 
Munich, No. 152, and also in the UflBzi, No. 471. 
Three good specimens of her work are at Dresden, 
Nos. 1978, 1979, 1980. Three small examples 
are at the Hermitage, Nos. 1304, 1305, 1306 ; 
and one work with two life-size figures, un- 
numbered, is in the French Gallery at the 
Louvre. At Hampton Court a full-length por- 
trait, No. 502, may be mentioned. 



192 



THE RISE AND PROGRESS 



A TABLE 
Of the Datbs or the Pbincipal PAmrsBS of the Gebmak Schools. 



School. 




Birth. 


Death. 


C!ologne • . 


Wilhelm yon Koln, first record 








lOdo ••••••• 


— 


1378 


Cologne . . 


Stepban Lochner, or Loethener, 








first record 1426 . . . 


— 


1451 


Swabian . . 


Martin Scbonganer, or Scbon 


1420 


1499 


Niirnberg . 


Michael Wohlgemuth . . . 


1434 


1519 




Israel von Meckenen . . . 


1440 


1503 


Westphalian. 


Master of Taesbom, date of 








altar-piece 1465 .... 


— 


— . 


Westphalian. 


Master of Lyrersberg, painted 








1463-90 


— 


— 


Cologne . . 


Master of the 'Death of the 








Virgin/ 15th century . . 


— 


•~~. 


TTlm • , . 


Bartholom&us Zeitblom, first 








record 1450 


— 


1517 


Augsburg . 


Hans Holbein, elder . . . 


1460 


1523 


Swabian . . 


Matthaus Griinewald, about . 


1460 


1530 


Niirnberg . 


Albrecht Durer .... 


1471 


1528 


Saxon . . 


Lucas Cranach, or Sunder . 


1472 


1553 


Augsburg . 


Hans Burgkmair .... 


1472 


1559 


Niirnberg. . 


Albrecht Altdorfer . . . 


1485 


1538 


Augsburg . 


Christopher Amberger . . 
Barthoiomaus Bruyn . . . 


1490 


1568 


Cologne . . 


1492 


1556 


Augsburg . 


Hans Holbein, younger . . 


1495 


1543 


Niirnberg 


Barthoiomaus Beham. . . 


1496 


1540 


Niirnberg . 


Hans Sebald Beham . . . 


1500 


1550 


Numberg 


GeorgPencz 


1500 


1550 


TTlm . . . 


Martin Schaffner .... 


1508 


1535 


Saxon . . 


Lucas Cranach, younger 


1515 


1586 




Johann Bottenhammer . . 


1564 


1623 




Adam Elzheimer .... 


1574 


1620 




Joachim Sandrart .... 


1606 


1688 




Johann H. Boos .... 


1631 


1685 




Balthasar Denner .... 


1685 


1749 




Christian Dietrich. . . . 


1712 


1774 




Anton Baphael Mengs . . 
Angelica Kaufmann . . . 


1728 


1778 




1742 


1808 



OF PAINTING ly SPAIN. 193 



THE RISE AND PROGRESS OF PAINTING IN 

SPAIN. 

The enterprise and wealth of Spain in the four- 
teenth and fifteenth centuries attracted artists to 
its capital both from Italy and the Low Countries. 
Following the demand for pictures which royal 
patronage and the Church originated, schools 
arose in different parts of the country, chiefly in 
Toledo, (yastile, Valencia, and Seville. The 
earliest native artists, most of whom belonged to 
the priesthood, appeared at the commencement of 
the fifteenth century ; Toledo being perhaps the 
first spot in which a school was developed. The 
earliest names of note, however, are those of 
men who lived in the latter half of the fifteenth 
century. One or two only can be mentioned : An- 
tonio del Rincon (1446-1 500) and Berruguete, the 
latter beginning to paint in the commencement of 
the sixteenth century. Of the former no works 
exist in any public gallery, unless a doubtful 
* Virgin and Child,' No. 345 in the Hermitage at 
St. Petersburg, attributed to him by Dr. Waagen, 
can be admitted. Portraits of Ferdinand and Isa- 
bella in the Cathedral of Granada are ascribed 
to him, but they are probably copies by a later 
hand. 

o 



Fifteenth 
century. 



Rincon. 



194 



THE RISE AND PROGRESS 



Sixteenth 
century. 

Berruguete. 



Joanes^ 



Luis 
Morales, 



Berruguete (1480-1561) is best known as an 
architect and sculptor: numerous examples of 
his admirable talent existing throughout Spain, 
especially in marble. No works exist in any 
gallery, although several paintings by his pupils 
may be found in that of Madrid, Nos. 2142 to 
2148 ; and these doubtless indicate the style of 
the master. 

Vicente Joanes, or Juanes, was a painter of 
note at Valencia in the sixteenth century (1506- 
1579). Several works are attributed to him in 
the Madrid Gallery, No. 755, a * Last Supper,' 
being the principal. The drawing and expression 
are good : the head of Christ, pleasingly rendered, 
is repeated by itself more than once, Nos. 759 
and 760; and of these he is known to have 
painted several replicas. A good portrait ex- 
ample is No. 754. A small work of high finish 
is No. 758. An excellent composition is No. 602 
at Dresden. Two good examples exist in the 
Hermitage at St. Petersburg, No. 328, a *St. Anna,* 
and No. 329, a * St. Dominic* His finest works are 
in the Museum and in the churches at Valencia. 

Luis Morales (1510-1586), a painter of sacred 
subjects exclusively, and generally treated in an 
ascetic spirit — hence called " El Divino." Pictures 
are attributed to him in the Madrid Gallery, 
Nos. 847 to 851 ; but they have little to re- 
commend them, and are faulty in drawing and 
colour. So also is a * Piedad ' in the Museum of 
San Fernando at Madrid. These works do not 



OF FAINTING IN SPAIN 



195 



fairly represent his power. He is better seen at 
the Hermitage, St. Petersburg, in Nos. 400 and 
401, * Madonnas,' and No. 402, a * Mater Dolorosa:' 
of these the first named is the best. There is a 
good * Ecce Homo,' No. 601, at Dresden ; and a 
characteristic * Christ bearing the Cross,' No. 545, 
in the Louvre. 

Alonso Sanchez Coello (about 1515-1590) was 
a portrait-painter of great ability. In the Madrid 
Museum, No. 1032, Don Carlos, and No. 1083, 
his sister, are good examples : the latter is very 
finely and delicately painted, with high finish 
and admirable execution of details. No. 1086 
is also well worthy of study. A portrait. No. 4 
at the Hermitage, St. Petersburg, is attributed to 
him by Dr. Waagen : the face appears to have 
been retouched. Three excellent and character- 
istic female portraits by him are in the Brussels 
Gallery, Nos. 157, 158, 159 ; and a full-length of 
Philip II. of Spain is ascribed to the master in 
our National Portrait Gallery, S. Kensington. 

Becerra and his deaf and dumb pupil Navar- 
rete, hence called "El Mudo," must be named. 
The careers of both occupy the interval between 
1520 and 1580. The former was a fresco-painter 
and sculptor. The latter studied in Italy during 
many years, and is said to have been a pupil of 
Titian. After his return to Spain he became 
painter to Philip I., for whom he chiefly worked. 
Three works are attributed to him in the Gallery 
of Madrid, Nos. 905, 906, 907. His finest pictures 

o 2 



Sanchez 
Coello. 



Becgrrd. 
Navarrete, 



196 



TKE RISE AND PROGHESS 



Luis de 
VargM, 



Pablo de 
Cespedes, 



are not now to be seen; several have perished, 
others are in collections which are not open to 
the public. 

Luis de Vargas (1502-1568) should be re- 
membered as the first to introduce oil-painting 
into Seville, and as an early painter of that 
school. A well-known work by him, represent- 
ing the * Generation of Jesus Christ,' painted 
1561, is in the Cathedral of Seville, often called 
* La Gamba,' owing to the fine drawing of the 
leg of Adam, prominently seen in the foreground. 
Frescoes painted by him on the outer wall of the 
Court of Oranges and in niches of Giralda Tower, 
have now disappeared. 

Pablo de Cespedes (1538-1608), of Cordova, 
was a man of great erudition and of many talents. 
He is said to have been a sculptor and architect 
as well as a painter. Moreover he v> as a poet, 
and, like De Vargas and Eoelas, a divine by pro- 
fession. All his works are lost except a * Last 
Supper ' at Cordova. 

Domenico Theotocopuli (1548-1625), better 
known as **I1 Greco," belongs to the Italian 
school by education, but is usually classed with 
the painters of his adopted country, Spain, where 
he lived for nearly fifty years, and died at Toledo. 
His works want colour and are very unattractive. 
Examples may be seen at Madrid, but a much 
better head than any there is in the Hermitage 
at St. Petersburg, No. 411. 

Francisco de Eibnlta, born about 1550, died 



Domenico 
Theotoco- 
puli. 



Bibaltcu 



OF PAINTING IN SPAIN. 197 



1628, was one of the chiefs of the school of 
Valencia and the master of Kibera. In the 
Museum and churches of Valencia his best works 
are still to be found. In the Madrid Gallery four 
are attributed to him. No. 947, * St. Francis of 
Assisi,' is a good example, and illustrates the 
rigid naturalism in details, and is conspic- 
uous for the deep dark shadows, of his school. 
The angel in the picture is necessarily conven- 
tional, and looks as if borrowed from an Italian 
source. In the Hermitage at St. Petersburg are 
two fair examples, Nos. 338, 340. His son Juan 
(1597-1628), who died early, was a promising 
painter, and his works are often confounded with 
those of his father. 

Jose de Kibera of Valencia (1588-1 656)^ sur- 
named in Italy " Lo Spagnoletto " (see" also 
under Italian schools, p. 89), spent much of 
his time in that country, and chiefly studied 
under Caravaggio there. A large number of his 
works are in the Madrid Gallery, Nos. 955 to 
1012 ; chiefly single heads on small canvases of 
apostles and saints ; and evidently painted fron^ 
models, and more or less portraits. The best 
examples of these are Nos. 956, 959, 963, 978. 
A * Magdalen,' No. 981, is less happy. A good 
illustration of the strong effect of light and dark 
shadows which marked the Neapolitan school is 
seen in No. 1006, a * Hermit at Prayer.' The 
following are examples of his most powerful 
work in large compositions. The * Martyrdom 



Bibera. 



198 



THE BISE AND PROGRESS 



of St. Bartholomew,' No. 989, a fine picture for 
drawing and composition. No. 977 is an admir- 
able single figure. No. 982, * Jacob's Dream,' is 
the figure of a sleeping Spaniard finely painted. 
In No. 983, * Isaac blessing Jacob,' the drapery 
and details are powerfully rendered. In the Aca- 
demia de San Fernando at Madrid are two 
excellent single figures of saints and a small 

* Head of St. John the Baptist in a Dish.' Some 
fine examples exist in the Hermitage, St. Peters- 
burg : particularly worthy of notice is No. 331, a 
^St. Sebastian after Martyrdom,' a grand and 
large composition, finely painted ; also Nos. 330, 
332, 333. In the Louvre is an * Adoration of 
the Shepherds,' No. 553, besides two others, at 
present without numbers : see catalogue at the 
end of this volume. Several good examples are in 
the Dresden Gallery, particularly Nos. 608, 610, 
and 618. Those in the National Gallery, Nos. 
235, 244, are not good specimens. 

Pacheoo. Francisco Pacheco, of the school of Seville, 

flourished about the same date as Eibera, and 
is interesting not only on account of his own 
excellent and very careful work, but as being the 
master and father-in-law of Velasquez. He is 
represented by four small pictures in the Madrid 
Gallery, Nos. 916 to 919; by a fine work, the 

* Miracle of San Pedro Nolasco,' No. 16 in the 
Seville Gallery ; and by an * Annunciation ' over 
the high altar of the University Chapel at Seville. 

/ His masterpiece, an enormous * Last Judgment,' 



OF PAINTING IN SPAIN. 199 

painted for the Nunnery of St. Isabel, no longer 
exists. 

Also of the school of Seville was Juan de las Hoeias. 
Roelas (1558-1625), the master of Zurbaran. His 
work is chiefly to be seen in his native city. In 
the Cathedral is a vigorous painting of * Santiago 
overthrowing the Moors,' and in the Museum 
the ' Martyrdom of St. Andrew,' No. 89. Three 
good examples of the master are in the Univer- 
sity Chapel ; and in the Church of San Isidore 
is the large composition representing the death 
of the saint, * El Transito,' generally considered 
as the masterpiece of the painter. 

The two Herreras of Seville, father and son, n? 
most not be overlooked, since their works are ^^'^^'^^ 
frequently met with in Spain, although examples 
in other European countries are rare. Francisco 
de Herrera el Viejo (bom 1576) is represented 
by several vigorous works in the Seville Museum, 
and by a large canvas of the * Last Judgment ' 
in San Bernardo there. There is a good example 
in the Louvre, Paris, No. 544 bis. Also in the 
Seville Museum are some of Herrera " el Mozo," 
or the younger (1622-1685), and in the Cathe- 
dral a large altar-piece of the * Apotheosis of 
St, Francis of Assisi,' weakly conceived and 
executed. A better work is the * Assumption of 
the Virgin ' in the Church of Our Lady of Atocha 
at Madrid. There is a finished work in the 
Hermitage, St. Petersburg, No. 389, * Virgin and 
Saints with a Picture,' 



200 



THE RISE AND PB0GRE88 



Alonso 
Cano, 



^urbaran. 



A gifted scholar of Pacheco was Alonso Cano, 
of Granada (1601-1667), who gained a reputa- 
tion as sculptor, painter, and architect, on which 
account he has sometimes been regarded as the 
"Michael Angelo" of Spain. In the Seville 
Cathedral there is a small and beautifully 
rendered * Madonna and Child ' by him, and in 
the University Chapel at Seville two single 
figures over the high altar. In the Madrid 
Museum are several good examples of his work, 
especially a 'Dead Christ and an Angel,' No. 
672 ; the figure of ' San Benito Abad,' No. 668 ; 
and a * Madonna and Child,' No. 670. In the 
Museum of San Fernando is a * Crucifixion ' by 
Cano. At Munich there is a * Madonna, Child, 
and St. Anthony,' No. 353. In the Hermitage, 
St. Petersburg, two good examples of the master 
may be seen, a * Madonna and Saints appearing 
to a Dominican,' No. 354, and a replica of the 
* Madonna and Child ' at Seville, No. 352. An 
excellent specimen is a * St. Agnes,' No. 414b at 
Berlin. 

Francisco Zurbaran, a native of Seville (1598- 
1 662), is known for simplicity, correctness, and 
breadth in treatment of single figures, mostly 
monks, of which numerous examples exist. 
The draperies are arranged in the large and 
massive folds which the monk's hood and 
gown present, and are admirably rendered. 
He is best seen at the Museum at Seville, 
where his principal work, the * Apotheosis of 



OF PAINTING IN SPAIN. 



201 



St. Thomas Aquinas/ No. 1, is far in advance 
of other examples of the master there — in some 
of which the treatment of the subject and 
draperies is stiff and hard. Such, for instance, 
are Nos. 46, 67, 74. A good series of five single 
monks are in the Academia de San Fernando 
of Madrid. The series relating to Hercules exists 
in the Madrid Gallery, where also is an admir- 
able figure of a sleeping youth, called * A Christ,' 
Jio. 1133. Two examples, Nos. 351 and 373, are 
at Munich; and one is at Dresden, No. 627. A 
very fine life-size figure, in warm colour with high 
finish, is the *St. Lawrence,' No. 349 at the 
Hermitage, St. Petersburg; there also is the 
'Child- Virgin Praying,' No. 348, an excellent 
smiall work. Two specimens of fair quality are in 
the Louvre, Nos. 558, 559. A very fine figure of 
a monk at prayer. No. 230, is in our National 
Gallery. Zurbaran became painter to the king 
before he was thirty-five years old, and executed 
for him at Buen Eetiro the ten pictures of the 
* Labours of Hercules ' referred to above. 

But Spain's greatest master was Don Diego 
Velasquez de Silva, who was bom at Seville in 
1599, and studied imder Herrera el Viejo and 
Pacheco. The power of reproducing human char- 
acter, great knowledge of chiaro-oscuro, vigorous 
drawing, and broad masterly treatment are 
qualities evident in all his works. As a youth 
he closely studied still-life and the human model 
as he found them in the streets, and an example 



Velasquez, 



202 THE RISE AND PB0GBES8 

is one of his earliest and most famous works, 
the * Water-carrier/ belonging to the Duke of 
Wellington. The finest compositions of Velasquez 
are at Madrid, for he worked almost exclusively 
for his king and patron Philip IV. of Spain, and 
in its Museum the master can alone be adequately- 
known and studied. No less than thirty im- 
portant works are there, including portraits, &c., 
besides numerous other but less remarkable 
examples, making sixty-four in all. Of these 
perhaps none is so full of vigour, so rich in colour, 
and so admirably composed as the celebrated 
* Borrachos,' No. 1058, a group of Spanish peasants 
making merry at a vintage festival. This fine 
work was executed when he was only twenty-five 
years old : it is painted solidly and carefully, and 
in this point yields to none of his later and more 
matured compositions, many of which are in 
comparison slight in structure, but masterly in 
execution. Next in order to the * Borrachos,' 
but much later in date (1645-48) comes the 
grand * Surrender of Breda,' No. 1060, one of 
Velasquez' masterpieces. It would be im- 
possible to admire too much the pose of the 
two central figures, or the knightly bearing and 
sympathetic expression of the victor as he receives 
his former foe, whose deportment while tendering 
the keys is rendered with equal grace and intelli- 
gence. The best portrait known of the master 
himself is found in the figure with a plumed hat 
to the extreme left. In the no less fine composition 



OF PAINTING IN SPAIN. 203 

of * Las Meninas/ No. 1062, so called from the 
maids of honour, who with two dwarfs amuse the 
Infanta, the master's power of chiaro-oscuro is 
very striking. The figure of Velasquez himself 
at his easel is prominent, while the background 
is admirably relieved by the looking-glass there, 
which reflects the persons of the King and Queen, 
whose presence in the chamber is thus made 
known. It was painted in 1656, and was his last 
great work : while occupied on it, it is said that 
Philip IV. took the painter's brush and made 
him a Knight of the Eed Cross of Santiago. The 
fourth of the large works here is *Las Hilan- 
deras,' or the * Tapestry Workers,' No. 1061, 
marvellous for freedom and mastery of the 
brush, full of air and light, and a fine study of 
composition and colour. In these works we see 
Velasquez at his best : he loved to delineate 
truthfully all objects around him in the ordinary 
circumstances of daily life, and thus the intense 
realism of his style prevented him from excelling 
equally in representations of mythological scenes 
and religious pictures, in which latter his famous 
contemporary Murillo, as we shall see hereafter, 
is unrivalled. An example of a mythological 
subject inadequately treated by Velasquez is 
the * Forge of Vulcan,' No. 1059, painted at 
Eome, during a visit to Italy, about 1629-30; 
while equally unsuccessful are an early * Adora- 
tion of the Kings,' No. 1054, and a * Coronation 
of the Virgin,' No. 1056. On the other hand^l a 



204 THE RISE ^ND PROGRESS 



the famous single figure of * Christ on the Cross,' 
No. 1055, painted in 1639, not a composite subject, 
but a single figure, treated entirely in a natural- 
istic manner, becomes a grand work in his hands. 
Some of the single figures and portraits in the 
Madrid Museum are marvellously powerful. First 
come the two life-size and well-known figures of 
JEsop and Menippus, Nos. 1100, 1101. Then 
the admirable and life-like representation of 
the 'Dwarfs of Philip IV.,* No. 1095, and 
its pendants, No. 109(i and No. 1097. Also 
the characteristic studies of semi-idiocy, No. 
1098, known as * El Nino de Vallecas,' and No. 
1099, ' El Bobo de Coria.' There are four large 
and fine equestrian portraits by him in the 
Museum : the dashing one of the boy Prince 
Baltasar Carlos, No. 1068 ; another of the Duke 
of Olivares, No. 1069 ; and those of Philip IV. 
and his Queen, Isabella of Bourbon, Nos. 1066 
and 1067. Portraits of Philip IV. often occur. 
Perhaps the best is No. 1074, where he is re- 
presented standing with his dog ; and No. 1080 
is a head, similar to that in our National Gallery, 
No. 745. Another fine replica is in the Hermi- 
tage, St. Petersburg, No. 420. Two full-lengths 
of Doiia Mariana and of the young Infanta 
Maria Teresa of Austria are also in the Madrid 
Museum, Nos. 1078 and 1084 ; the latter being 
the more delicate in treatment. Other portraits 
here not to be passed over can only be enume- 
rated: such are Nos. 1086, 1073, 1076, 1075, 



OF TAINTING IN SPAIN, 



205 



1091, 1092. And examples of landscape are 
Nos. 1106, 1108, and others; the large one 
of Aranjuez was painted in lb*42, which was also 
probably the date of the * Boar-hunt' named below. 
Out of Spain, works by Velasquez are but rarely 
met with in public galleries. It is commonly said 
that in Italy only one work by him exists, and 
that is the grand life-size portrait of Innocent 
X. seated, in the Doria Gallery at Home; but 
there is undoubtedly another, a fine head, hung 
rather high in the Gallery of the Capitol, 
also in Eome. A fine study, doubtless from the 
life, of the Pope's head, is now in the Hermitage, 
No. 418. In the Louvre at Paris are a beautiful 
portrait of the Infanta Margaret of Austria, 
No. 555, and another of Philip IV., No. 555 bis ; 
and in the Collection La Caze one is ascribed to 
him of the Infanta Maria Teresa, No. 37. In 
our National Gallery is a large representation 
of a * Boar-hunt at Aranjuez,' No. 197, his finest 
work of the kind, and an * Adoration of the 
Shepherds ' is attributed to himj in his early style, 
No. 232. In the Dulwich Gallery is a possibly 
genuine portrait of Philip IV., No. 309 ; a fine 
full-length of the King exists at the Hermitage, 
No. 419, and a grand one of the Due d'Olivares, 
No. 421, is there also ; an excellent head of the 
latter is No. 422. A very striking full-length 
portrait, life size, is that of a Spanish Admiral, 
unnumbered, in the Berlin Museum. But the 
Belvedere at Vienna contains the largest number 



I 



206 



THE RISE AND PROGRESS 



Pareja. 



Del Mazo. 



Murillo. 



of works, Madrid excepted. The most important 
composition at Vienna is a group of the * Painter 
and his Family/ No. 14, SaUe VII. Ital. 1^"^ 
etage. No. 6 is another youthful portrait of 
Baltasar Carlos ; No. 13, one of the Infanta Mar- 
garet ; No. 15, a full-length of the Infanta Maria 
Teresa; No. 47, the same; No. 18, a middling 
replica of the bust of Philip IV. ; and No. 40 
is another laughing idiot. These are all in the 
same room. Another good replica of the Infanta 

j Maria Teresa is No. 51a at the Stadel, Frankfort ; 

: and No. 51 is a head of Cardinal Borgia, also 
there. Three portraits are to be seen in the 
Munich Pinacothek, Nos. 366, 366a, 367. 

Juan de Pareja (1610-1670), the faithful slave 
of Velasquez, after studying painting in secret 
during many years, ultimately received his free- 
dom. He became a pojrtrait-painter of no great 
merit. He is represented at Madrid by a single 
large picture. No. 935, * The Calling of Matthew.' 
At the Hermitage, St. Petersburg, he is known 
by one portrait, No. 427. 

Juan Bautista Martinez del Mazo, a favourite 
pupil and the son-in-law of Velasquez, is re- 
presented at Madrid by fifteen works, chiefly 
landscapes, Nos. 788 to 803. He followed his 
master's style, for whose work Maze's copies are 
sometimes mistaken. He died in 1667. 

Bartolome Esteban Murillo was bom at Seville 
in 1618, but in his twenty-fourth year he arrived 
in Madrid and became a scholar of Velasquez. 



OF PAINTING IN SPAIN. 207 



The large number of important paintings that 
now exist by Mnrillo, besides smaller works to be 
found in many European galleries, are evidences 
of the master's great fertility and steady labour. 
Just as Velasquez achieved the highest excel- 
lence in Spain by a realistic although subtle 
study of nature, so Murillo is the most perfect 
representative of Spanish ideal art. This remark 
is not intended, however, to apply to the earlier 
works of Murillo — for nothing can be*more natu- 
ralistic both in subject and execution than his 
wonderful studies of beggar-boys — but to later 
and more matured compositions, when his talent 
was occupied solely with religious subjects. 1'he 
different styles which Murillo adopted at various 
periods of his life are commonly known as the 
"Frio," or cold style; the " Calido," or warm 
style ; and the " Vaporoso," or aerial style. To 
find examples of Murillo's early work we must 
look to galleries out of Spain, for not one of the 
* Beggar-boys ' remains in his native country. In 
the Louvre an excellent example exists. No. 551. 
In our Dulwich Gallery there are two fine paint- 
ings of Spanish peasant-boys, Nos. 283 and 286, 
and an admirably painted flower-girl. No. 248. 
In the Munich Gallery there are three groups 
of Spanish boys, Nos. 348 (the best), 349, and 
357 ; besides two other paintings, one of peasant 
girls, the other a woman and boy, Nos. 368 
and 376. The Hermitage, St. Petersburg, pos- 
sesses three excellent examples in Nos. 376, 



208 THE BI8B ANV PROGRESS 



*Boy and Dog;' No. 377, * Peasant laughing 
at a Dog ;' and No. 378, ' Girl with Fruit.' 

It is at Seville, however, that most of the 
master's finest compositions are still to be found. 
The Cathedral contains one of his masterpieces, 
the * Infant Christ appearing to St. Anthony of 
Padua,' a wonderful work in the " warm style." * 
In the Museo some twenty-four works by Murillo 
are preserved. Chief among these is the well- 
known * St. Thomas of Villanueva distributing 
Alms,' No. 84, which is perhaps the most com- 
plete of all Murillo's compositions, although 
the *St. Elizabeth of Hungary attending to 
the Poor ' may be preferred by some. Certainly 
the * St. Thomas ' conveys an admirable lesson 
to any student of art in the grouping of the 
figures and the masterly arrangement of light 
and shade throughout the work. Another of 
the best works in the Museum is a beautiful 
* Assumption of the Virgin,' No. 55, better known 
as a * Concepcion,' a subject which Murillo often 
chose and always painted in his " vaporoso " 
style. Two others are here also — a colossal paint- 
ing. No. 68, and another of the ordinary size. 
No. 93. Two fine male figures, SS. Leandro and 
Buenaventura, No. 83, and the two female saints 
Justa and Kufina, No. 95, are admirable examples 
of his second style. Equally good are four 

♦ This is the picture from which the figure of St. Anthony 
was not lone: ago cut out and carried away to America. It was 
recovered, and has been well replaced. 



OF PAINTING IN SPAIN, 209 



separate representations of. ' Saints with the Infiajit 
Christ; Nos. 45, 53, 60, 92. Also a ' Madonna 
and Child with St. Felix,' No. 90; the famous 
' Virgin and Child,' No. 52, called ' La Servilleta,' 
from an erroneous tradition that it was painted 
on a napkin ; and the fine early picture of the 

* Madonna and St. Augustine,' No. 59. Other 
important canvases are still to be seen in the 
Hospital of the Santa Caridad at Seville, although 
five of the eight which originally formed the 
series here, painted between 1670 and 1674, 
have been dispersed. In the chapel there 
hajig two very fine works by Murillo — ^* Moses 
striking the Rock,' and its pendant, the * Miracle 
of the Loaves and Fishes.' Besides these are the 
following : a smaller work in the dark style ap- 
proaching much to that of Bibera, and known as 

* San Juan de Dios ;' a fine * Concepcion ;' and two 
small panels of an * Infant Christ ' and the * Child 
St. John.' Many excellent examples are in the 
Madrid Museum, Particularly fijie compositions 
are the 'Virgin appearing to St. Bernard' and 
the * Virgin receiving St. Ildefonso,' Nos. 868, 
869. The ' Holy Family del Pajarito ' and the 

* Adoration of the Shepherds,' Nos. 854 and 859, 
are specimens of the master's more naturalistic 
style. Three fijie * Conceptions ' are here, each 
one dijBFerent, Nos. 878, 879, 880. The charming 
and well-known picture of the ' Child Jesus and 
St. John,' or * Los Nines de la Concha,' No. 866, 
is also here, as are many others well worthy of 



210 THE BI8E AND PE0GEE88 



notice. In the Academia de San Fernando is 
the afore-mentioned fine work of Murillo, * St. 
Elizabeth of Hungary attending to the Poor.' 
There are besides two large semi-lunar canvases, 
both noble compositions, relating to the miracle 
of the snow : of which the ' Dream,' the finer of 
the two, is regarded as the first example of 
his "vaporoso" style. The Hermitage, St. 
Petersburg, is very rich in the master's works, 
among which the following may be noted : No. 
360, 'Isaac blessing Jacob,' a large canvas, 
chiefly landscape ; No. 361, an * Annunciation ;' 
No. 362, one of his * Conceptions,' a good example, 
but not of the finest rank. A picture of extreme 
beauty is a * Holy Family,' or • Eepose in Egypt,' 
No. 367 ; a large and good composition, the 
* Deliverance of Peter,' is No. 372 ; a ' St. Anthony 
and Child,' No. 373, is a lovely picture ; while 
in his darker style, but a fine work, is the 
'Martyrdom of Pedro Arbuez,' No. 374. An 
' Adoration of the Shepherds,' No. 380, presents 
a charming infant amidst a group of rude Spanish 
peasants. Besides these there are several small 
beautiful works. Our National Gallery contains 
admirable examples in the *Holy Family,' No. 
13, and in the well-known 'St. John and the 
Lamb,' No. 176, of which there is a fine replica 
at the Hermitage, No. 379 ; while the Dulwich 
Gallery possesses another, the * Madonna del 
Eosario,' No. 347. In the Louvre are three fine 
•' Conceptions,' in the " vaporoso " style, Nos. 546, 



OF FAINTING IN BFAIN. 211 



546 Ws, 546 quater ; also a * Holy Family,' No. 
548, similar to that in the National Gallery ; and 
a * Madonna and Child,' No. 547, in his " cold " 
style. Another * Madonna and Child ' of his best 
period is No. 40 in the Pitti. An admirable 
* St. Anthony and Child ' is No. 414 at Berlin. 
A fine work, the * Apotheosis of San Eodrigue,' 
forms No. 633 in the Dresden Gallery. Murillo's 
last picture was a * Marriage of St. Catharine,' 
an altar-piece for the Church of the Capuchins 
at Cadiz, where it remains, still unfinished : he 
stumbled on the scaffold and received an injury, 
of which he soon after died, in 1682. 

Sebastian Gomez was Murillo's slave and 
painted after his master's manner : an example is 
Na 386 in the Hermitage, St. Petersburg. But 
a closer and more accomplished imitator of 
Murillo was Alonso Miguel de Tobar. Some of 
his productions have doubtless passed for those 
of the master : he is chiefly seen in some churches 
in Spain. 

J. Carreno de Miranda (1614r-1685) painted i)e 
numerous religious pictures and some excellent 
portraits. He became one of the painters to 
Philip IV. and subsequently to Charles II. 
Examples of his portraiture may be seen lq the 
Madrid Museum : note Nos. 690, 692. 

Diego Gonzales de la Vega (1622-1697) was 
also a court painter, but his works are feeble and 
need not be enumerated. 

Juan de Valdes Leal (1630-1691) painted 

p 2 



Sebastian 
Gomez, 



Be Tcbar. 



Miranda, 



De la 
Vega. 



Leai. 



212 



THE BISE AND PB0GBE88 



religious pictures of considerable note. Examples 
of his work are to be found at the Hermitage, 
Nos. 391, 392, 393, 394. Another is at Dresden, 
No. 636 ; and at Madrid Nos. 1049, 1050. 

Claudio Coello of the school of Castile (1635- 
1693) has rightly been termed in Spain the 
" last of the old masters ;" for after him Spanish 
monarchs engaged foreign painters to adorn their 
palaces, instead of employing native artists. 
Coello held this post in the household of 
Charles EE., for whom he executed his principal 
work, the ' Collocation of the Host,' still preserved 
in the Esccrial. His own portrait by himself is 
No. 431 at the Hermitage. 

A long list of painters of very inferior merit, 
living in the latter part of the seventeenth and 
in the beginning of the eighteenth centuries, 
might follow here ; but a study of their works is 
neither interesting nor instructive. Sir W. 
Stirling Maxwell's very complete 'Annals of 
the Artists of Spain ' will furnish all necessary 
details respecting them, if the reader wishes to 
pursue the subject further. 
Goya. The last painter to be mentioned here is Fran- 

cisco Goya y Lucientes, who lived in the latter 
half of the eighteenth century. Without syste- 
matic instruction in his art, he studied the old 
masters almost solely and by himseK, and be- 
came a prolific painter. His nature appears to 
have been wild and eccentric, but he produced 
some excellent works of different kinds, among 



OF PAINTING IN SPAIN. 213 

them some large compositions and some capital 
portraits. Several of the former are found 
ill the Madrid Museum, one salon the^e heing 
entirely devoted to large designs for tapestry. 
Among the portraits are those of Charles IV. 
and Dona Maria Luisa, which frequently occur. 
An excellent example, a full-length portrait 
of a man seated, may be found in the Long 
Gallery of the Louvre : it is at present without a 
number, and is not in the published catalogue. 

It may not be out of place to say here, in 
reference to any school of painting proper to 
Portugal, that the existence of one has never 
been recognised. In fact, a history of the schools 
of painting in Spain covers the art history of 
the entire Peninsula. There are moreover in 
Portugal no public galleries worthy of mention ; 
and almost the only known Portuguese painter 
is Gran Vasco, who flourished probably in the 
earlier part of the sixteenth century, and to 
whom some productions of that age are chiefly 
attributed. 



TES BI8S AND FBOORSIW 



A TABLE 
Or THE Datu or TBI Fbhtoifal Paimteiis c 



' THE BpAtnSH BCBOOLS. 



m,o.^. 




Birth. 


Inatfa. 


Toledo 


Antonio d'-l Giaooa . . . 


14-Ki 


1500 


Castile 








1480 


1.^61 


Sevilla 






Luifide Vargas .... 


1502 


1S6S 


Valencia 






VirentE J^aiies, about . . 


1506 


1579 


Tolodo 






LiiiB de MoruluB, el Div-ino . 


1510 


1586 


Caatile 






Alonso 8..ncli-.'7 Coeilo, about 


1515 


1590 


Cikatlle 






6iiBpftr Bfoerra .... 


1520 


1570 


Castile 








1526 


1579 


Seville 






P.,blodeCcBpedPB. . . . 


1538 


1608 


Toledo 






DODL Theooopiili. " II Greco " 


1548 


lti2a 


SevUle 






A. V.isquBZ, painted about 












1580-1610 






Vttlenoia 






Franoiaoo da Bibalta . . . 


1S50 


1628 


Seville 






Juan de las Boetaa . . . 


1558 


1625 


Seville 






Francisoo Paeheco . . . 


1571 


JBS4 


CHfltile 






Viiwue Oarducho . . . . 


1572 


1639 


SoviUe 






FrimcisT) Herrera, el Viejo . 


157(i 




Toledo 






LuisTriataa 


1586 


1640 


Yalenoitt 






Joae' dc Ribera, Lo Spiigooletto 


1588 


16S6 


Vulencia 






Juan de BibBlta .... 


l.iStV 


1628 


Seville 








1598 


1662 


Seville 






Diego VelHWUeldeSilva . 


1599 


ItStiO 


Coatile 




1 J. B. Martinez deiMaiit., . 




1667 


Oiaaoda 




1 Aloneu Cano 


lUOi 


16S7 


Seville 






Antonio del OastUio . . . 


1G03 


laii7 


Seville 






1*1:1111) da Moya .... 


1610 


1666 


Castile 






Juan Pareja 


1010 


1670 


Castile 






Juan Cortiifio de Miranda . 


iei4 


16B5 


Seville 






Bu.rb)loine' Eateban Murillo . 


1618 


1682 


SevUle 






Sebastian Gomez, "Mulatto 












<ie Murillo." obout . . , 


1620 




Seville 






Francisco deHarrera, el Mizo 


1622 


1685 


Castile 






Diego Gonial.* de la Vuga . 


1622 


1697 


Seville 






Juan di.- VaWes Leal . . . 


li;30 




Oaslile 






Claudio Coulio 


1635 


1K93 


Seville 






Alonxo Miguel de Tobar . . 


1678 


1758 


Madrid 






FrauciBco Goja , , . . 


1746 


1825 



OF PAINTING IN FRANCE. 215 



THE RISE AND PROGRESS OF PAINTING IN 

FRANCE. 

It was not one of the distinguishing features of 
the French nation or genius to produce any early 
painter of great excellence, like those who flou- 
rished in Italy, the Netherlands, and Germany, 
during the thirteenth, fourteenth, fifteenth, and 
sixteenth centuries. In the absence of native 
skill, the French monarchs of those times ob- 
tained artists from foreign countries, chiefly from 
Italy, to decorate their palaces. Hence, when 
a French school really sprang into existence, its 
first masters received their inspiration very much 
from the Italians. From the sixteenth century 
the names of a few painters have survived, but 
before this time we only know of one, Jean Fmtquet, 
Fouquet, illuminator and miniature painter to 
Louis XI., and who was evidently influenced 
by the school of Van Eyck. There is no known 
work of his in the Louvre, although two life-size 
portraits, long regarded as unknown, have recently 
.been attributed to him, Nos. 652, 653. Four 
panels also, the authorship of which is unknown, 
are there represented. No. 650 as work of the end 
of the fourteenth century. No. 651 and others as 
work of the fifteenth century. 



216 



THE RISE AND PB0QRE88 



Sixteenth 
century, 

Clouets, 



Cousin. 



Seventeenth 
century. 



Of those who lived and painted in the sixteenth 
century the first in chronological order were the 
ihreu Olouets — Jean or Jehan Clouet, the father ; 
his son, also called Jean; and his grandson, 
Franpois Clouet. The father came originally 
from Flanders, and brought with him to France 
much of the manner and the feeling of the Van 
Eycks. By Franqois, the most important of the 
three, a few portraits are still in existence. In 
the Louvre he is represented by two portraits of 
Charles IX. and of Elizabeth of Austria, Nos. 107 
and 108. Some other small works are attributed 
to him, and numerous portraits exist by his 
followers. There is a fine portrait by the master. 
No. 1487, at the Hermitage, St. Petersburg; 
and two are at Berlin, Nos. 472, 475. Good 
small portraits are Nos. 561 and 631 at Hampton 
Court, and No. 2420 at Dresden. Still smaller, 
and like a gem for brightness and beauty, is No. 
429, portrait of a lady, at the Stadel, Frankfort. 

Jean Cousin, bom about 1500, whose history 
is very obscure, was a man of cultivated taste, 
for it is known that he worked as painter, 
sculptor, and architect ; and was also the author 
of a book on portraiture. His largest and only 
authentic work is the painting of the * Last 
Judgment,' No. 137 in the Louvre at Paris. 

Both Martin Freminet and Simon Vouet 
belong principally to the seventeenth century, 
and both studied much in Rome, where they 
came under the influence of the Eclectic school. 



OF PAINTING IN FRANCE. 217 

One work by Freminet is to be seen in the Frdminet 
Louvre, 'Mercury, -3Eneas, and Dido,' No. 211. 
Some important works by Vouet are also there, Vmct. 
Nos. 641 to 648, of which Nos. 641 and 647 are the 
best. A good specimen of the master is in the 
Brussels Museum, *San Carlo Borromeo pray- 
ing for those attacked by the Plague,' No. 343. 
But Vouet also forms a connecting link between 
the earlier French painters and the greater and 
more independent school of the seventeenth and 
eighteenth centuries, since he was the master of 
Le Sueur, Le Brun, and Mignard. Before, however, 
considering these, who were essentially French 
artists, we must first notice the works of those 
painters who, from the style of their compositions, 
may be said to belong in part to the Italian school. 
Such were Nicolas Poussin, Gaspar Dughet (often 
erroneously called Gaspar Poussin), Claude Gel6e 
(known as Claude Lorraine), Moise Valentin, and 
Sebastien Bourdon, 

Nicolas Poussin (1 594r-1665), bom in Normandy, Nicolas 
was perhaps the greatest master of the French ^o«*««»w« 
school. When still young, and in spite of great 
difficulties^ he succeeded in making his way to 
Bome, and there enrolled himself among the 
pupils of Andrea Sacchi; but he formed his 
style chiefly from the study of the antique 
and of the works of the great Renaissance 
masters. He usually chose subjects for re- 
presentation which could be treated classically, 
and executed them with due regard to historical 



218 THE RISE AND PROGRESS 



truth in relation to dress and details. His works 
are generally wanting in effective distribution 
of light and shade, in depth and in warmth 
of colour. In consequence of his correctness of 
composition and excellent grouping, he has been 
termed the "Painter of Intellect." Poussin is 
therefore seen to the greatest advantage in the 
treatment of mythological subjects. Numerous 
works by the master are in the Louvre: Nos. 
448, 449, 450, 451 are representations of the four 
seasons, illustrated by subjects taken from the Old 
Testament history. His own portrait, No. 447, is 
interesting. Examples of mythological subjects 
are * Bacchanalia,' No. 440 ; the * Triumph of 
Flora,' No. 443 ; the * Shepherds of Arcadia,' No. 
445 ; and a subject from Koman history. No. 436 : 
while the * Diogenes,' No. 453, is a good specimen 
of Poussin's landscape painting. Besides these 
the Louvre contains some large canvases of 
subjects from sacred history: for example, 
* Eleazar and Rebecca,' No. 415 ; two composi- 
tions of the * Finding of Moses,' Nos. 416, 417 ; 
the * Ecstasy of St. Paul,' No. 433; and many 
others. One fine example of Poussin, among 
many bad ones, in the Madrid Gallery, is a 
representation of the ' Chase of Meleager,' No. 
2051. A few average examples are to be found 
at Berlin. He is well seen at the Hermitage, 
St. Petersburg, in the * Triumph of Neptune,' Na 
1400, and others ; and at Dresden, among which 
No. 648 may be noted. In the Vatican Gallery 



OF PAINTING IN FBANCK 219 



there is a large and powerful composition, the 
* Martyrdom of St. Erasmus/ No. 34, but it is 
unpleasing in colour and too uniform in tone. 
Good illustrations from mythology are in our 
National Gallery: a * Bacchanalian Dance,' No. 
62; and a * Bacchanalian Feast,' Na 42. At 
Dulwich similar works are Nos. 305, 315. Poussin 
spent but a short portion of his time in France, 
and returned to Eome for the remaining years of 
his life, where he died in 1665. 

Gaspar Dughet was bom in Eome, but of Gaspar 
French parents, and his sister married Nicolas ^^*- 
Poussin, so that the two painters were intimately 
connected. Gaspar became a landscape-painter, 
and doubtless received instruction both from 
Nicolas Poussin and Paul Bril, the Flemish land- 
scape-painter. By Gaspar there are some charac- 
teristic works in our National Gallery, rath^ir dark 
and sombre in tone, Nos. 31, 36, 95, 161, At 
Dresden, among others, all of which are good, 
one fine example exists. No. 656a ; and in the 
Pitti Pahu>e at Florence Nos. 421, 436, and 441 
are all noble landscapes. Others are to be 
noted at Madrid and at Munich. 

But Claude Gel6e, called Lorraine from his ciaude 
native province, has a far greater reputation as ^'O^^*^- 
landscape-painter than Gaspar Dughet He exe- 
cuted classical landscapes and seaside pictures, 
and often gave a poetical charm to an otherwise 
uninteresting subject. In the Louvre are some 
fijie works by the master: the ^Landing of 



220 



TEE BISE AND PR00EE88 



Valentin. 



Cleopatra at Tarsus,' No. 223 — ^a good example 
of Lorraine's successful adaptation of an historical 
ovent ; the * Ulysses/ No. 225 ; a ' Sea-poii;,' No. 
226 ; the ' ViUage Fair,' No. 221 ; and No. 224, 
' David anointed King by Samuel.' Still better 
works than these by Claude are to be found in our 
National Gallery : notably the * Embarkation of 
the Queen of Sheba,' or the * Bouillon Claude,' 
No. 14; and No. 6, * David at the Cave of 
Adullam,' known as the *Chigi Claude.' The 
* Marriage of Isaac with Eebecca,' No. 12, is a 
repetition of the large work in the Doria Palace 
at Bome. Nos. 5, 30, and 55 should also be 
noticed. At the Dulwich Gallery he is fairly 
represented by Nos. 244, 270, 275. In the Madrid 
Museum a * Hermit at Prayer ' and a * Magdalen,' 
Nos. 1989, 1992, are excellent works ; so also are 
the very fine examples in the Hermitage at 
St. Petersburg — ^namely, four representations of 
' Morning,' * Noon,' ' Evening,' and ' Night,' Nos. 
1428, 1429, 1430, 1431. There are two noble 
landscapes in the UflSzi, Nos. 774 and 848 ; one 
in the Brussels Museum, No. 199; two in the 
Dresden Gallery, Nos. 654, 655; and four at 
Munich, Nos. 391, 399, 407, 416. 

Moise Valentin, although born in France, left 
it at an early age for Eome, where he studied 
and remained all his life. There he was a friend 
and contemporary of Gelee and Poussin, but he 
painted in the manner of Caravaggio. The ex- 
amples of his work at the Louvre are not first-rate, 



OF PAINTING IN FRANCE. 



221 



with the exception of the * Concert/ No. 586, and 
the * Fortune-teller/ No. 588. Two canvases in 
this style are at the Hermitage, Nos. 1490, 1491. 
He succeeded best, like many Italian artists in 
the seventeenth century, when he confined him- 
seK to unambitious subjects. A large work by 
him is in the Vatican, the 'Martyrdom of San 
Processo,' No. 32 : the subject is coarsely treated 
and unpleasant in colour, but the drawing is 
correct. Somewhat similar is a large ' Martyrdom 
of St. Lawrence,' No. 2075 in the Museo at 
Madrid. 

Sebastien Bourdon likewise studied at Rome. 
His best work is the * Martyrdom of St. Peter,' 
now in the Louvre Gallery, No. 42 ; besides this 
are a * Descent from the Cross,' No. 40, and two 
good examples of portraiture, Nos. 47 and 48. 
Li the Cassel Gallery No. 456, a * Vivandiere and 
Officers,' is a characteristic work. Another is at 
the Hermitage, the * Death of Dido,' No. 1421. 
He was moreover a landscape-painter, and is re- 
presented by a good specimen in the National 
Gallery, No. 64. 

Eustache Le Sueur was the first French painter 
of note who confined his studies to Paris without 
visiting Eome. His life was short and uneventful. 
His talents were barely appreciated, and were 
overshadowed by the greater fame of his ambi- 
tious rival Charles Le Brun. Le Sueur executed 
numerous compositions, the most important of 
which are to be seen in the Louvre Gallery. 



Bourdon, 



Le Sueur. 



222 



THE RISE AND PB00BE88 



Le Brun^ 



One of his earliest works is the series of twenty-two 
paintings relating to the * History of St. Bruno/ 
Nos. 525 to 547. They are for the most part 
commonplace both in design and execution; 
Nos. 525 and 527 being superior to the others. 
His masterpiece, the well-known 'Preaching of 
St. Paul at Ephesus/ No. 521, is also there. The 

* Christ bearing the Cross,' No. 517, and the 

* Descent from the Cross,' No. 518, are works of 
smaller size, but of excellent quality. As examples 
of Le Sueur's paintings of another character, the 
representations of the * Nine Muses,' Nos. 558 to 
562, and his latest work, the series of paintings 
relating to the ' History of Love,' Nos. 551 to 556, 
should be noted. 

Charles Le Brun, born at Paris in 1619, went 
to Italy when young and entered the school of 
Poussin. On his return to his native city he was 
appointed to fill some important posts by Louis 
XIV. For the King he painted several vigorous 
pictures of subjects from the ' Life of Alexander 
the Great,' now preserved in the Louvre, Nos. 70 
to 74, which possesses all the best works of Le 
Brun, excepting a ' Massacre of the Innocents,' No. 
252, and ' Horatius keeping the Bridge,' No. 319, 
in the Dulwich Gallery. Among those in the 
Louvre there are several sacred subjects, such as 
the * Sleeping Jesus,' No. 56, a 'Holy Family,' 
known as the ' Benedicite,' No. 57, and four from 
the ' Life of Christ,' Nos. 58, 59, 60, and 61. In 
the * Descent of the Holy Ghost,' No. 64, Le Brun 



OF PAINTING IM FRANCE. 223 



has painted his own portrait as one of the 
assembled disciples; and his *Eepentant Mag- 
dalen/ No. 66, is said to have been intended 
as a portrait of Madame de la Valliere. The 
same subject exists in the Munich Gallery, 
No. 392, with others. Examples are to be found 
at Berlin, St. Petersburg, Dresden, and Vienna, 
and one at the Uffizi. 

A rival and successor of Le Brun in the King's Mignw-d. 
favour was Pierre Mignard (1612-1695), best 
known as a portrait-painter, although he was not 
exclusively so. His famous * Vierge a la Grappe,' 
No. 349 in the Louvre, was painted under the 
influence of the Italian school during his long 
residence in Borne ; another fine work is a large 
canvas in the Hermitage at St. Petersburg, 
'Darius at the Feet of Alexander,' No. 1456. 
These are two excellent productions for one who 
devoted himself chiefly to portraiture. A large 
group of Louis the Dauphin (son of Louis XIV.), 
his wife and children, No. 358, besides Mignard's 
own portrait. No. 360, are in the Louvre. Other 
portraits are Nos. 670 and 688 at the Uffizi ; and 
in the Madrid Gallery are several, Nos. 2021, 
2023, 2024, and 2025. 

Another able French portrait-painter was Rigavd. 
Hyacinthe Eigaud (1659-1743), who executed 
a large number of portraits of Louis XIV. and of 
his courtiers. In the Louvre there is a portrait 
of the monarch himself. No. 475 ; of Bossuet, 
No. 477; and of Charles Le Brun and Pierre 



224 



THE BI8E AND PB0GBE8S 



Largillikre, 



Van Loo, 



Watteau, 



Mignard on one canvas, No. 480. Rigaud's 
portraits are frequently met with. There is one 
example in our National Gallery, No. 903. Three 
are in the Dulwich Gallery, Nos. 2, 98, 118. At 
Dresden one occurs. No. 676; and at Vienna 
another, No. 73, Cabinet Vert, V^ etage. 

A contemporary of Kigaud was Largilliere, one 
of the most successful portrait-painters of the 
time : an example in the Louvre is No. 320, a 
portrait of Charles Le Brun ; and in the La Caze 
Collection are a portrait group, No. 224, a portrait, 
No. 221, and a small study. No. 216, for the good 
group of the * Conference,' which is No. 1537 at 
the Hermitage, St. Petersburg. 

Charles van Loo, bom 1705, the most talented 
of a family which produced several painters. He 
painted mythological subjects and some good 
portraits, and hence must be briefly named here. 
In the Louvre is a good full-length of Marie, 
Queen of Louis XV., No. 330, besides other works. 
His elder brother, J. B. van Loo, is represented 
by a large work, No. 324. 

At this period a new direction was afforded to 
the talents of the painter by the habits and 
tastes of Louis XIV.'s court and their love for 
an elegant outdoor life. The first exponent of 
the new style was the famous Antoine Watteau 
(1684-1721), and many followed at more or less 
distance in his steps. He forsook the rigid 
classical subjects of his predecessors, and chose 
to represent the manners, dress, and customs 



OF PAINTING IN FBANCE, 225 



of the members of the " Belle Society " at that 
period. For this purpose he depicted with 
admirable grace and vivacity the "reunions " and 
" fetes galantes " then so much in vogue ; crowd- i 
ing his small canvases with groups of ladies i 
and gentlemen in brilliant and fashionable 
costume, love-making, dancing on the green 
turf, or loitering amidst garden temples in , 
ornamental grounds. In these subjects Watteau 
gained deservedly a great reputation, but : 
naturally such a form of art would easily ■ 
become degraded when adopted by imitators of 
inferior taste. Most of Watteau's works have 
the quality of excellent grouping, contain some 
good landscape, and all have the charms of fresh 
sparkling colour. A fine example is in the \ 
Louvre, No. 649 ; others are in the La Caze Col- 
lection there, Nos. 260, 263. Two characteristic i 
works are in the Dulwich Gallery, Nos. 197, 210; : 
two small ones at Berlin, Nos. 468, 470 ; and two ' 
similar at Dresden, Nos. 687, 688. At Madrid there 
are two charming specimens of the master, Nos. ; 
2083, 2084 ; others are to be seen in the Uffizi ■ 
at Florence, No. 671 ; at Munich, No. 1312 ; and 
at Vienna, No. 20, Salle II, Rez-de-chauss^e. 

Of Watteau's followers there are three who 
should be mentioned, because their works occur 
in European galleries. These are Nicolas Lancret 
(1690-1743), J. B. Joseph Pater (1696-1736), and \ 
Francois Boucher (1704-1768), perhaps the best 
known of the three. > 

<4 



296 



THE RISE AND PB0GBES8 



Lancret, 



Pater: 



Boucher, 



Fragonard, 



lancret, inspired by Wattean, executed si 
liairge number of similar works, but they lack 
originality, and are often vulgar. A series, re^ 
presenting ' Infancy, Youth, Manhood, and Old 
Agei,' are in our National Gallery, Nos. 101 
to 104; ten examples may be found in the 
Louyre and the La Caze Collection ; and three 
other works are at Dresden, Nos. 696, 697, 698. 
He is well seen at the Hermitage in three im- 
portant works, Nos. 1507, 1508, 1510. 

Pater was, like Watteau, a native of Valen- 
ciennesy and adhered closely to his style, fre- 
quently copying his master's works. Examples 
may be found' at Dresden and in the Louvre 
(Collection La Caze). 

Francois Boucher also painted out-of-door 
scenes with groups of pretty shepherdesses 
guarding very artificial-looking sheep, accord- 
ing to the style in vogue at that time, and 
furnishing evidence of a decline in artistic taste 
and the degradation of art. He decorated china, 
and produced numerous designs for tapestry, ceil- 
ings, &c. Besides these he painted some cabinet 
pictures, of which there are fair examples 
in the Louvre. A * Diana and NymphJs,' No. 24, 
a *Kenaud and Armid,' No. 23, and a larger 
* Vulcan and Venus,' No. 25, should be noted, 
besides others, in the La Caze Collection. J. 
Honors Fragonard (1732-1806) must be named* 
as one of Boucher's scholars. Some of his paint- 
ings are in the Louvre. For abundant illustra- 



OF PAINTING IN FRANCE, 



227 



tions of work by this group of artists see the I 
catalogues at the end of this volume. 

The animal-painters of the French school 
must not be omitted. There were two contem- 
porary with Watteau, and who appeared some- 
what to emulate the style of Snyders, and 
executed some studies of game and hunting- 
pieces. These were Pran9ui8 Desportes (1661- 
1743) and J. B. Oudry (1686-1755). Several 
works of both masters are to be seen in the 
Louvre: among those by Desportes are studies 
of dogs of Louis XIV., while Oudry succeeded 
him at court and painted dogs for Louis XV. 
Examples of Desportes are Nos. 164, 180, 181^ 
and of Oudry are Nos. 386, 387, 388. 

One painter of flower-pieces, reminding us of 
the Dutch masters, was J. B. Monnoyer (1634- 
1699), generally called " Baptiste." He is best 
seen at the Louvre. Several examples are at 
Hampton Court 

It is a pleasure to turn from these somewhat 
mannered and artificial works to the truly admir- 
able and charming studies of genre and still-life 
by J. B. Simeon Chardin (1699-1779), one of the 
most successful portrayers of " nature morte " be- 
longing to his own or any other school. All the 
works by him in the Louvre, and there are many, 
are worthy of close study, although only a few of 
the finest can be enumerated here. A genre 
painting, known as the * Blessing,' and a ' Dead 
rabbit with Hunting-gear,' Nos. 99 and 100, are 

Q 2 



Desportes. 
Oudry, 



Monnoyer. 



Chardin, 



228 



TEE RISE AND PB0GRE8S 



Greuze, 



two of the best in this gallery. In the La Gaze 
Collection his works are still more numerous. 
There is a somewhat inferior version of the 
' Blessing,' No. 170, but the still-life merits the 
highest praise — note particularly Nos. 174, 175, 
176, 179, 180, 181, 184. It is interesting to observe 
the different methods Chardin adopted in treating 
these subjects: for example. No. 180 is for the 
most part thinly painted in transparent colour; 
while in No. 184 the colour is solidly laid on, and 
forms throughout a thick impasto. Two works 
are attributed to the master in Dulwich Gallery, 
Nos. 27 and 308. An admirable portrait of 
Madame Geoffrin is in the Musee Fabre at 
Montpellier, No. .79. At the Hermitage is a 
charming little picture, the * Washer- woman,' 
\ No. 1514 ; and there is a replica of the * Blessing,' 
less good than the preceding. No. 1513. Prince 
Liechtenstein possesses four beautiful little works, 
Nos. 557 to 560 in his gallery at Vienna. 

Another able painter of genre subjects and 
portraits was J. B. Greuze (1725-1805). One of 
his best works is perhaps the ' Village Betrothal,' 
No. 260 in the Louvre; but equally good are the 
' Paternal Curse,' No. 261, and the * Broken Jug,' 
No. 263; there also are numerous studies of 
single heads, in which he gained a great reputa- 
tion; many similar heads are in the La Caze 
Collection. Three portraits are in our National 
GaUery, Nos. 206,1019, 1020; and one at Hampton 
Court, No. 413. Several excellent examples are to 



OF PAINTING IN FRANCE. 229 



be found in the Musee Fabre at Montpellier, 
especially Nos. 241, 246. An admirable com- 
position is the * Death of the Paralytic/ No. 
1520, a rather large canvas, in the Hermitage. 
Most of the master's productions are, however, in 
private galleries. 

The best marine-painter of the French school 
was Claude Joseph Vemet (1714^1789), whose 
works occur in most European galleries. Our 
National Gallery contains a fine example, a 
* View of S. Angelo, Rome,' No. 236. No fewer 
than forty of his compositions, chiefly marine- 
pieces, are preserved in the Louvre, of which 
Nos. 596, 615, 617, 623 are the best. Others 
may be found at Dresden, Munich, Florence, and 
Madrid, but they are as a rule uninteresting. 

Joseph Marie Vien (1710-1809) should be 
remembered as having been the first to awaken 
a love for ancient classic art, as a reaction against 
the miserable prettiness of the Boucher school. 
Examples of his work exist in the Louvre, Nos. 
634 to 637, of which the first named is the best. 

Jacques Louis David (1748-1825) carried on 
the movement commenced by Vien, and took the 
remains of Greek and Koman art, in bas-relief 
and sculpture, as models for figures and their ac- 
cessories in his pictures. During the First Empire 
this taste was carried to an extreme, and domi- 
nated not only the productions of the artist, but 
those of the art-workman of every grade. Of 
David's compositions in the Louvre, fourteen 



Vcmet. 



Vien. 



David. 



230 THE BI8E AND PROGRESS 

in all, the * Oath of the Horatii/ No. 150, was 
one of the earliest. The ' Sabine Women,' No. 
149, created a great sen^tion when it appeared, 
but to the present taste it appears to exhibit an 
affectation of classical knowliedge, and to be too 
dramatic in action. Some portraits are also in 
the Louvre : one of Madafne Kecamier, No. 160, 
and another of Pius VII., No. 159, should be 
noted. 

The names of a few other French masters of 
minor importance may be recorded here. Some 
of their works, enumerated in the catalogues, are 
meritorious and important, but do not appear to 
be sufficiently so, or to possess enough originality, 
to warrant the introductibn of any notes respect- 
ing the painters thetaselves into our history. 

Historical, Battle, Decorative : Laurent de la 
Hire, Bourguignon, i Bon Boullongne, Jean Jou- 
venet, J. B. Santerte, Noel Coypel, Antoine 
Coypel, Subleyras, Trioson, Fr. Lemoine, J. F. 
de Troy, Casanova^ 

Landscape: Peter* Patel. 

Portraits : Louis Tocque, J. B. van Loo. 

Still -life : Eoland de la Porte. 



OF PAINTING IN FRANCE. 



Of the Dates 


or THE Principal Faintbbs 




F THE French Sohdou 


«»,. 




Blrtb. ' 


1^. 




Jenn Fonquet. irst lislf of 








the 15th cenlTiry , . . 








Jelian Clouet, father, settled 








in TaniB about 1^0 . . 








Jehan Clouet, sou . . 








1541 




Jean CoasiD, about . 






1500 


1590 




FrancoiB Clouet, about 






1510 


1374 




Mttrtb Frtminet . . 






1567 


1619 




Louis Lenain, olmut . 






15S3 


1648 




Simon VDUut . . . 






1592? 


1641 




Nicolas PouRsin . . 






1B94 


1665 




Moiae VoJeutin . . 






leoo 


1632 




Claude GeUe (LorrQine) 






1600 


1682 




L.delaHire . . . 






16Ufi 


1656 




Pierie Migoaid . . 






1612 


1695 




Gaspar Dughet (Pouaaiii' 






l<il3 


1675 




B^natieD Bnnrdon . 






leiG 


1671 




BuBtache Le Sueur . 






l(il7 


1655 




Charles Le Bnia . . 






1GI9 


1690 




J. CnurtoiaCBoorguignon 






1(121 


1676 




NoelCojpel . . . 






1028 


17(17 




Jean BaptietB Monnojer 






1634 


1(199 




J. B. Santerre . . . 






le50 


1717 




Nitolaa do LargUlitre 






I65S 


1746 




Hyaointho Kit-aud 






lliS9 


174!) 




Antoino Coypel . . 






1601 


1722 




Fraucois Desportea . 
Jean Joureoet . . . 






lesi 


1743 








1661 


J717 




J. Frangois de Troy . 






1680 


1752 




Antoiae Watteau . . 






1684 


1721 




J. B. van Loo , . . 






1684 


I74r. 




Jeao Baptiete Ondry . 






168(i 


1755 




Framoifl Lemoine 








1737 




Ni<wl«t Lanoret . . 






IbOO 


1743 




L, TM^ni .... 






1G96 


1772 ■ 



23? 



TEE BISE AND PB0GRE88 



School. 




Birth. 


Death. 




Jean Baptiste Joseph Pater . 


1696 


1736 




P. Subleyras 




1699 


1749 




Sim^n Cliardin . . 






1699 


1779 




Francois Boucher . 






1704 


1768 




diaries van Loo . 






1705 


1765 




Joseph Marie Vien 






1710 


1809 




Claude Joseph Vernet 






1714 


1789 




Boland de la Porte 






1724 


1793 




Jean Baptiste Greuze. 






1725 


1805 




Fr. Casanova . . . 






1730 


1805 




Jean Honore Fragonard 






1732 


1806 




Jacques Louis David . 


1748 


1825 



OF PAINTING IN ENGLAND. 



233 



THE RISE AND PROGRESS OF PAINTING IN 

ENGLAND. 

No native school of painting, in the ordinary 
sense of the term, existed in England before the 
reign of Charles I., who encouraged and patron- 
ised art in this country as no monarch had done 
before him. In a certain department of painting, 
however — that of miniature — there were early 
and good representatives of the art. Thus in the 
latter half of the sixteenth century was bom in 
England Nicholas Hilliard, followed by a famous 
pupil, Isaac Oliver, who in the seventeenth was 
succeeded by his son Peter and by John Hoskyns, 
all of whom painted numerous portraits in minia- 
ture, and with great success. 

The kings of England prior to the time of 
Charles I., like those of France, invited foreign 
artists of celebrity to visit their courts, and 
gave them commissions to execute. Henry VII. 
employed Jan Mabuse in this manner ; and in 
Henry VIIL's reign Hans Holbein took up his 
residence in England, and remained during the 
last seventeen years of his life. Under Queen 
Mary, Queen Elizabeth, and James I. several 
Flemish painters — viz. Gerard Horembout, Sir 
Antonio Moro, Lucas de Heere, Comelis Janssens, 



Sixteenth 
century. 

Billiard. 
TheOlivas. 



23i 



TEE BISE AND PB0GBE88 



Samuel 
Cooper. 



Seventeenth 
century, 

Dobson. 



Stone. 



and Daniel Mytens — occupied posts at court ; and 
in the reign of Charles I. Eubens and Van Dyck 
were brought over, the latter residing here for a 
long period. But in this reign there appeared also 
some native artists whose names are worthy to be 
placed on record. First must be named a minia- 
ture-painter of great skill, Samuel Cooper (1609- 
1672), whose works were in much demand both 
in this country and abroad. He painted a well- 
known portrait of the Protector. At the same 
time two others appeared who were inspired by 
Van Dyck, and proved worthy followers of that 
great master — namely, William Dobson and 
Henry Stone, called ** Old Stone :" they flourished 
during the first half of the seventeenth century. 

Dobson was an excellent painter of portraits, 
the best of which are now in private collections. 
After the death of Van Dyck he became one of 
the King's painters. Portraits of himself and his 
wife in one frame are in the Gallery at Hampton 
Court, No. 376. His own portrait and that of 
Francis Quarles may be seen in the National 
Portrait Grallery, South Kensington ; while a head, 
interesting as being that of the keeper of the 
gallery of King Charles I., is preserved in the 
Hermitage, St. Petersburg, No. 1387. 

Stone worked both as sculptor and painter. 
A good copy by him of the * Comaro Family ' 
of Titian may be seen at Hampton Court, 
No. 444. His copies also of some of Van 
Dyck's portraits are perhaps among the best of 



OF PAINTING IN ENGLAND. 235 



his productions, and are so good as to hjaye 
passed for works of the master. 

After Van Dyck two foreign painters succeeded 
him at court : these were Sir Peter Lely and 
Sir Godfrey Kneller. 

Lely, a Westphalian by birth, but of Dutch Lely. 
extraction, gained a great reputation in England 
as a painter of female portraits, and was for 
this reason employed by Charles II. to paint 
the reigning beauties of the day. These works 
are still at the Hampton Court Gallery. Numerous 
and good examples of portraiture by Lely may 
be seen in the National Portrait Gallery, p^irticu- 
larly may be noted those of Mary Davis, of Nell 
Gwynn, of the Countess of Shrewsbury, and 
of the Duke of Buckingham. 

Godfrey Kneller was a native of Lubeck, but \ Kneiier. 
worked chiefly in this coimtry, where he painted 
most of the notable men of his time, and in 
particular some of the members of the " Kit-Kat 
Club." Many good specimens of portraiture exist in 
the Hampton Court Gallery, among which should 
be mentioned a fuU-Jength of Peter the Great in 
armour. No. 57. Some of his portraits may be 
seen at the South Kensington Portrait Gallery, 
those of the Duke of Bedford and William 
Congreve being the best ; and one is in our 
National Gallery, No. 273. Two portraits in the 
Hermitage may also be noted — one of Locke, No. 
1388 ; the other of Gibbons the sculptor. No. 1389. 

An Englishman, Eobert Walker, painted por- Walker. 



236 



THE RISE AND PROGRESS 



RUey. 



Richard- 
son. 



Jervas. 



Thomhill 



traits in the seventeenth century, especially of 
the chiefs of the Commonwealth. One of Crom- 
well is in the Hermitage, No. 1386 ; and others 
may be found in the National Portrait Gallery. 
A portrait of himself may be seen at Hampton 
Court, No. 365. 

Sir Peter Lely had one pupil of some note — 
namely, John Riley, born in London, by whom 
there is a portrait at Hampton Court, No. 372. 
He was the master of Jonathan Richardson, who 
is better known as a writer on art than as a 
painter. Both these painters are represented in 
the National Portrait Gallery: the former by 
portraits of Lord Russell and King James 11. ; 
the latter by portraits of Anne Oldfield and 
Matthew Prior. There also, among the portraits 
of great lawyers recently presented by Serjeants' 
Inn, is one of Lord Chief Justice Pratt by 
Richardson. 

Charles Jervas, bom in Ireland, may be named 
here as a pupil of Kneller, whose style he 
adopted. An interesting portrait of Dean Swift 
by him may be seen in the National Portrait 
Gallery. His friendship with Pope should not 
be forgotten. 

Sir James Thomhill, bom in the latter part 
of the seventeenth century, attained a certain 
reputation by his large works. They possess, 
however, no particular merit, being chiefly decora- 
tive, and following the conventional style of the 
age. Examples are to be seen on the ceilings of 



OF PAINTING IN ENGLAND, 



237 



Hampton Court, in the cupola of St. Paul's, and 
in the great hall of Greenwich Hospital. 

William Hogarth, who became the son-in-law 
of Thomhill, was educated as a painter and en- 
graver, but his genius marks him as the first 
in this country to originate a style of painting 
entirely his own. With him it may be said 
that the English school began. He employed his 
art with the object of exposing certain follies, 
fashions, and political usages then cun^ent 
in society. This he did by designing series of 
paintings or engravings, in which he depicted, in 
a powerful and happy manner and in a dramatic 
form, occurrences illustrative of the evils he 
desired to satirise. The famous seriQ3 of paint- 
ings of the ' Marriage a la Mode,' now Nos. 113 to 
118 in our National Gallery, are some of his most 
successful works, and, apart from their value as 
satires, show Hogarth's mastery in the arts of 
grouping, expression, and colour. The first 
series that appeared was that of the /Harlot's 
Progress,' six in number ; these were followed by 
the * Hake's Progress ;' but many of the original 
paintings and designs for these and others have 
been destroyed, and many works remain to us 
only in the form of prints. Hogarth also 
painted a few portraits. That of himself, which 
he repeated more than once, is in our National 
Gallery, No. 112; where also is a small portrait 
of his sister Mary, No. 675. A charming small 
portrait of himself seated at his easel exists in 



Eighteenth 
century. 

Hogarth. 



288 



THE RISE AND PROGRESS 



Ramsay. 
Hudson. 



the National Portrait Gallery. The well-known 
one of Captain Coram is still preserved at the 
Foundling Hospital. 

After Hogarth came Allan Ramsay and Thomas 
Hudson, who were good portrait-painters of this 
period. The former worked in Edinburgh ; and 
the latter derives celebrity chiefly from having 
been the master of Sir Joshua Eeynolds, who 
was destined to succeed Ramsay as painter to 
George III., and whose fame soon overshadowed 
that of less favoured rivals and contemporaries. 
Two examples of Hudson's work will suffice — 



Reynolds. 



namely, the portrait of Handel in our National 
Portrait Gallery, and that of Lord Chief Justice 
Willes, which forms one of the new collection of 
lawyers' portraits there. 

Reynolds was bom at Plympton in Devonshire 
in 1723, and at eighteen came to London to study 
under Hudson. Before taking up his residence 
here, however, as a professional painter, he spent 
some three years in travelling on the Continent, 
where he saw and commented on the masterpieces 
of Italian and Flemish art. Reynolds rapidly 
gained reputation on his return to London in 1752, 
and was employed to paint the portraits of most 
of the celebrated men and many of the beauties 
of the day, who considered it a privilege to sit to 
him. On the formation of the society of painters 
which became the Royal Academy of Arts, 
Reynolds was appointed first president, and 
I afterwards delivered in that capacity his well- 



OF PAINTING IN ENGLAND. 239 



known * Discourses on Art.' Eeynolds's power 
displayed itself in a fine appreciation of colour, 
and in a happy knowledge of how most gracefully 
to place a sitter and arrange the accessories to a 
portrait. No doubt his drawing was weak, and 
as regards extremities often quite neglected ; but 
his mastery of the brush, largeness of style, and 
cleverness in hinting what he would not stay 
to define suflBced greatly to cover the defect. 
His style was particularly suited to express the 
delicate traits and unrivalled beauty of English 
women, especially those who belong to our noble 
families. His canvases still charm us by their 
grace and elegance, although not a few have lost 
the original tints, with which they were finished. 
Many of them, now pale and colourless, are 
reduced indeed to the white and warm greys of 
the first painting, because in many instances 
he depended entirely upon thin glazes for the 
flesh-tints, and these were often fleeting in their 
character. Then Sir Joshua made many experi- 
ments with vehicles of different kinds, in order 
to obtain a thick and rich impasto, and the 
cracking of these by time has fatally damaged 
other works. 

Those examples of the master which are pre- 
served in our National Gallery, and they number 
twenty-three in all, are, however, for the most part 
in excellent preservation. One of the most im- 
portant of these is the pleasing composition known 
as the ' Graces decorating a terminal figure of 



240 THE RISE AND PROGRESS 



Hymen,' No. 79, being portraits of the three 
daughters of Sir William Montgomery, all beau- 
tiful women and admirably grouped. A specimen 
of his ' Holy Families ' occurs in the Gallery, No. 
78, but is simply a domestic group of English 
type. Of the well-known ' Infant Samuel ' there 
is an example here, No. 162 ; but the subject was 
often repeated — one is in the Dulwich Gallery, No. 
285, and another may be seen in the Musee Fabre 
at Montpellier, France, No. 416. Similar to the 
* Samuel ' in size and treatment are two other 
works in the National Gallery : the carefully 
executed but somewhat faded ' Age of Innocence,' 
No. 307 ; and a girl with a robin and cage, known 
as ^Robinetta,' No. 892. Another work to be 
noted is the * Snake in the Grass,' No. 885 ; and 
last, but not least, the Gallery possesses several 
admirable male portraits. Perhaps the most 
striking of these is the life-like and vigorous 
portrait of ' Lord Heathfield holding the Key 
of Gibraltar,' No. Ill ; while scarcely less excel- 
lent as an example of honest portraiture is that 
of two gentlemen in one frame. No. 754. These 
testify to the power possessed by Eeynolds of 
seizing and reproducing on canvas the character 
— in these examples so different — of his various 
sitters. The famous portrait of his friend Samuel 
Johnson, No. 887 — whose biographer, James Bos- 
well, is also represented here, No. 888 — must be 
noted. The fine head of the 'Banished Lord,' 
No. 107, and the study of a man's head in profile, 



OF PAINTING IN ENGLAND, 241 



No. 106, are proofs of the master's rich and 
powerful colouring, and remind us both of Titian 
and of Eembrandt. Finally there are two portraits 
of Eeynolds himself, Nos. 306 and 889; while 
a third occurs in the Dulwich Gallery, No. 146 ; 
a fourth is in the National Portrait Gallery ; and 
another at the Uffizi at Florence, No. 540. In 
the first-named collection is a repetition of the 
famous portrait of Mrs. Siddons as the * Tragic 
Muse,' No. 340 : the original is said to be that in 
the Grosvenor Gallery. It is in good preservation, 
and is one of the master's noblest productions, alike 
as regards drawing, expression, and colour. The 
' Mother and her Sick Child,' No. 143, and the 
study from the larger work of the * Death of 
Cardinal Beaufort,' No. 254, both at Dulwich, 
and the portraits of the Earl of Bath and Lord 
Keppel in the Portrait Gallery, must not be passed 
without mention. Eeynolds was honoured by a 
commission from the Empress Catharine of Eussia 
to paint a composition of his own choice for her 
gallery at St. Petersburg. After much considera- 
tion, he produced the * Infant Hercules strangling 
the Serpents,' now in the Hermitage at St. 
Petersburg, No. 1391, without doubt one of his 
most successful compositions. The same gallery 
contains two less happy works of the master, a 
* Venus and Cupid,' No. 1390, and the * Con- 
tinence of Scipio,' No. 1392. Most of Eeynolds' 
works are naturally in private collections in this 
country, many being still in the hands of the | 

B 



242 



THE RISE AND PROGRESS 



Gains- 
borough, 



families for whose ancestors they were originally 
painted. 

But Eeynolds, in spite of his great reputation, 
was not without successful rivals in his own 
branch of art — ^that of portraiture. Two painters 
of note shared with him the public favour 
— ^namely, Thomas Gainsborough and George 
Eomney. 

Gainsborough was bom at Sudbury in Suffolk 
in 1727, and when still young came to London and 
studied under Francis Hayman, a painter of small 
note, who produced some historical pictures. 
Both master and pupil were original members of 
the Koyal Academy, and the latter acquired one 
of the first reputations of the English school. 
Gainsborough's portraits are generally less pleas- 
ing in colour than those of Sir Joshua, and have 
an undue predominance of bluish grey in the 
flesh-tint ; nevertheless they are always graceful 
productions. He executed a great number of 
works of various kinds, and in landscape was one 
of the first masters in the English school. Most 
of his paintings are in private galleries ; as, for 
instance, the Grosvenor, which possesses two of 
the best known — the famous ' Blue-boy ' and the 
* Cottage-door.' The National Gallery contains 
some important works of the master both in 
portraiture and in landscape. Among the single 
portraits, that of Mrs. Siddons seated, in a blue- 
striped dress. No. 683 ; that of Dr. Schomberg, 
No. 684 ; and that of the Parish Clerk, No. 760, 



OF PAINTING IN ENGLAND. 243 



are the best; while No. 789 is an example of 
Gainsborough's portrait groups. The landscapes 
here are admirable, and exemplify the different 
styles which the master adopted. That known 
as a * Wood Scenfe, with the Village of Comard 
in Suffolk/ No. 925, is treated in the style of the 
Dutch masters, and in the carefully executed 
foliage and grey-brown tone reminds one of 
Hobbema ; but the distance is rendered with far 
more tenderness and delicacy than is visible in 
Hobbema's work. The 'Market-cart,' No. 80, 
illustrates an entirely different style. Gains- 
borough has in it paid more attention, to chiaro- 
oscuro than to highly-finished detail, and the 
general tone is dark and brownish in colour. 
The * Watering-place,' No. 109, again differs in 
treatment from those already noticed, and is distin- 
guished by colour almost Titianesque in its rich- 
ness, and by large masses of dark broadly-executed 
trees. Gainsborough is better seen as a worthy 
rival of Sir Joshua in the admirable family 
portraits at the Dulwich Gallery. The well- 
known and charming group of the two daughters 
of Thomas Linley — namely, Mrs. Sheridan and 
Mrs. Tickell — No. 1, is one of his best works. Por- 
traits of their father and of two other members 
of the Linley family are Nos. 358, 361, 362. 
Another very pleasing example is * Portraits of 
Mrs. Moodey and her Children,' No. 366. 

George Konmey also was much celebrated as a 
portrait-painter in his day, in spite of the popu- 

B 2 



Homney, 



244 



THE BI8E AND PB0QBE88 



Wilson. 



larity of Eeynolds and Gainsborough. He was 
bom in Lancashire, and, after studying some 
years at Kendal, came to London, where he 
lived and worked, with the exception of a visit 
to Italy, till his death in 1802. His works, like 
those of other English masters, are rarely found 
in public galleries, and it is only in the collec- 
tion of "Old Masters" exhibited each winter 
at the Eoyal Academy that the public has an 
opportunity of forming a fair estimate of their 
worth. A single portrait by Eomney is in the 
National Gallery, that of the beautiful Lady 
Hamilton, No. 312. Another of the same lady and 
one of Richard Cumberland should be mentioned 
in the National Portrait Gallery. But he was also 
distinguished by his historical works and by his 
cartoons, some of which, eighteen in number, Nos. 
150 to 167, are in the Royal Institution, Liverpool. 
Richard Wilson, bom at Pinegas in Mont- 
gomeryshire in 1713, was another gifted painter 
of the same period. He began with portraiture, 
but his taste inclined him to landscape-painting, 
and with the intent of studying this branch of 
art more especially he went to Rome and resided 
there six years. On his return to London he was 
made a member of the Royal Academy, but never 
attained wealth or reputation during life, as many 
of his contemporaries did. His landscapes are 
chiefly Italian, harmonious in colour and poetic 
in feeling, and, with the exception (perhaps) of 
I Gainsborough, he ranks as the first landscape 



OF PAINTING IN ENGLAND, 



245 



master of his day. One of his finest productions 
is in the National Gallery, a * View of the Buins 
of the Villa MsBcenets at Tivoli/ No. 108 — a 
subject which he frequently repeated when it had 
become a favourite with the public. One replica 
is to be seefrlJiilm^9«teieh. Gallery, No. 215. 
Another admirable composition, also in the 
National Gallery, is a 'Landscape with the 
Destruction of Niobe's Children,' No. 110; besides 
five small Italiau views, Nos. 267, 301, 302, 
303, 304. The South Kensington Museum 
contains one smaU and very charming example 
of landscape by evening light, No. 246. 

Joseph Wright, called from his native town 
Wright of Derby, is a name not to be omitted 
here^ He worked first under Hudson the por- 
trait-painter, but his strength was in landscape 
and genre scenes. One portrait may be mentioned 
— ^namely, that of himself in the National Portrait 
Gallery. An important example in his charac- 
teristic style is in our National Gallery, a large 
party witnessing an experiment on the air-pump, 
No. 725 — an effect of candlelight, which, as well 
as other artificial forms of light, made a subject 
attractive to him. 

There were yet some able portrait-painters 
who flourished a few years later than the three 
already mentioned : these were John Hoppner^ 
John Opie, and Henry Eaebum. 

Hoppner was bom in London in 1753, but did 
not begin to study as an artist till his twenty- 



Wright of 
Deriy. 



Hoppner. 



246 



THE RISE AND PROGRESS 



Opie, 



Raehum, 



second year, when he became a student at the 
Royal Academy. Some of his portraits are at 
Hampton Court, and three are in the National 
Gallery — 'So. 133, the portrait of Mr. Smith the 
actor; No. 233, that of William Pitt ; and No. 
900, that of the Countess of Oxford. Others may 
be seen in the National Portrait Gallery : note in 
particular those of Lord Grenville and of Lord 
Lansdowne. 

John Opie, bom in 1761 near Truro in Cornwall 
of humble parents, showed signs of much talent 
when still young, and came to London to be 
introduced to Sir Joshua. He worked both as 
an historical and as a portrait painter, and ulti- 
mately succeeded Fuseli as Professor of Painting 
to the Royal Academy, having previously been 
made a member. The ' Death of Rizzio ' was one 
of his most important works in painting, and for 
literary illustration he produced several historical 
drawings. One portrait by him is to be seen in 
the National Gallery, that of William Siddons, 
the husband of Mrs. Siddons, No. 784; and 
Opie's own portrait is preserved in the Dulwich 
Gallery, No. 3, as well as in the National 
Portrait Gallery, South Kensington. 

Henry Raebum was bom near Edinburgh in 
1756, and became one of Scotland's best portrait- 
painters. He worked chiefly in the North, after 
visiting London and making a joumey to Italy, 
and became a member of the Royal Academy 
in 1814. His portraits are tmthful represeuta- 



OF PAINTING IN ENGLAND, 247 



tions of his sitters' characteristics, and he suc- 
ceeded best in depicting the sturdy well-marked 
features of his ovm. countrymen. Neither the 
National Gallery nor the Dulwich Gallery possess 
any of his works ; but a single head, of the Eev. 
John Home, may be seen at the National Portrait 
Gallery, and the painter is often represented at 
the Winter Exhibition of Old Masters. 

John Singleton Copley, bom in America in 1737, 
had to contend with many difficult circumstances 
in the beginning of his artistuJ career, but, nothing 
daunted, he worked steadily as a portrait-painter 
till he left America in 1774. He then travelled 
to England, the Low Countries, and Italy, but 
finally settled in London for the remainder of 
his life. His two finest works are in the National 
Gallery: the well-known * Death of Chatham,' 
No. 100, in which the assembled members of 
the House of Lords are portraits ; and the dra- 
matic and admirable composition of the * Death 
of Major Pierson at St. Holier, Jersey,' No. 733. 
Besides these large works there is a small study 
for the painting at Guildhall of the * Siege and 
Belief of Gibraltar,' No. 787. These and several 
other important historical works Copley executed 
in London, but he chiefly exhibited portraits at 
the Royal Academy, of which he was a member. 
As examples of portraiture a study of Lord 
Heathfield and a fine full-length of Lord Mans- 
field should be noted in the National Portrait 
Gallery. 



Copley. 



248 



TBE BISJB AND PB0GRES8 



Benjamin West was also an American by 
birth, in the year 1738. His talent for painting 
showed itseK at a very early age, and he went 
to Philadelphia, where he received his first in- 
struction. At eighteen he worked independently 
as a portrait-painter, and a few years later went 
to Home, and after a stay of three years came to 
London, which he decided to make his home. 
He was appointed President of the Eoyal Academy 
on the death of Sir J. Eeynolds, and exhibited 
a large number of works every year. He painted 
chiefly historical subjects, both sacred and classical. 
Some of these are now in the National Gallery : 
for example, * Pylades and Orestes brought as 
Victims to Iphigenia,' No. 126; *Cleombrotos 
banished by Leonidas II., King of Sparta,' No. 
121 ; and a large canvas, ' Christ healing the Sick 
in the Temple,' No. 131. One of West's best 
works is the * Death of General WoKe,' which 
belongs to the Marquis of Westminster, while a 
replica. No. 320, may be seen in the Queen's 
drawing-room at Hampton Court among many 
other large canvases. West was bold enough in 
this work ^to make a great innovation — ^namely, 
that of dressing his characters in modern costume, 
instead of representing them in classical dress 
according to the custom of the day. 

James Barry was born at Cork in Ireland in 
1741, and studied art in Dublin, when Edmund 
Burke helped him to go to England and to Italy 
to finish his studies. He eventually settled in 



OF PAINTING IN ENGLAND. 249 



London, and became a member of the Koyal 
Academy and subsequently Professor of Painting 
there. His chief works were those he executed 
for the Society of Arts at the Adelphi. They 
are six in number, and represent the civilisation 
of man. Barry was a warm advocate for the 
introduction of large paintings as a decoration 
of St. Paul's, and was much annoyed at the 
rejection of the proposition by the Bishop of 
London. Another example of the master's 
work may be seen in the South Kensington 
Museum, an * Adam and Eve ' of . no great 
merit; and his own portrait is to be found in 
the National Portrait Gallery. Barry died in 
1806, after a short illness, and was buried in St. 
Paul's Cathedral. 

Henry Fuseli, a Swiss by birth, succeeded Barry 
as Professor of Painting, of whom a few words 
must be said, although both he and the eccentric 
William Blake lived into the first quarter of the 
nineteenth century, of which it is not within the 
scope of our design to speak. Fuseli is better 
known as a critic on art than as a painter, and 
his addresses delivered to the students of the 
Academy were interesting and valuable. His 
pictures, for the most part historical, were 
remarkable for extravagance in design and 
conception. He painted many subjects in illus- 
tration of the dramas of Shakespeare, but no 
example of these or any other of his works exists 
in the National Gallery or in the Dulwich 



Fuseli. 



250 



THE BISE ASD PROGRESS 



Blake. 



SitMs, 



J£orland, 



Gallery. A Shakespearean subject may be seen 
in the Liyerpool Institntion, No. 148. 

William Blake, bom 1757, was the author 
I of several poetical works, and in order to illustrate 
I them made numerous drawings,* most of which 
are extremely defective as works of art, while 
some display a curiously wild and original treat- 
ment of the subjects. He also illustrated Job, 
Young's * Night Thoughts,' and some of Milton's 
works; and one of his best productions is the 
* Canterbury Pilgrims,* painted in water-colour. 

There are two animal-painters who must be 
noticed before bringing this sketch to a close : 
namely, Greorge Stubbs of Liverpool and George 
Morland of London. The former had a remark- 
able talent for drawing horses, and wrote a work 
on their anatomy. 

Morland (1763-1804) painted small landscapes, 
chiefly for the purpose of introducing diflerent 
domestic animals, in the portrayal of which he 
greatly excelled. His favourite subjects were 
pigs, horses, and village interiors ; but his talent 
was ruined by his dissolute and reckless habits, 
and he died in the prime of life. As examples, 
a small portrait of himself may be cited at the 
National Portrait Gallery, and three admirable 
and characteristic works in the South Kensington 
Museum, the ' Beckoning,' No. 237, * Horses in 
a Stable,' No. 403, and ^ Seashore and Fishermen,' 
No. 1404, the two last named having been 
painted in 1791. 



OF PAINTING IN ENGLAND. 251 



Following the plan adopted with other schools, 
the names of a few English painters will be 
mentioned, respecting whom particulars are un- 
necessary. 

Historical : Fr. Hayman. 

Portraiture : George Jameson, Michael Wright, 
J. Zoffany, David Allan, Nathaniel Dance. 

Landscape: George Smith of Chichester, 
P. J. de Loutherbourg, F. Zuccarelli, Francis 
Bourgeois. 

It suffices simply to name the following who 
painted miniature in the seventeenth century: 
Thomas Flatman, Alexander Browne, and a 
little later Lewis Crosse. Early in the eighteenth 
century, Bernard Lens, and later Jarvis Spencer, 
followed by Nathaniel Hone. 

The great English school of water-colour 
painting took its rise in the latter part of the 
eighteenth century. It is no part of our design 
to illustrate its history, but belonging to that 
period must be mentioned, in connection with 
landscape, the names of those able artists, Paul 
Sandby, John Cozens, and Thos. Girtin. 



252 



TEE RISE AND PROGRESS 





A TABLE 

OF THE PbINCIFAL PAINTKRfl C 






Of thk Dates 


F THE Engl 


IflH^SOHOOL: 


SchooL 




Birth. 


Death. 




Nicholas Hilliard .... 


1547 


1619 




Isaac Oliver 


1555 


1617 




Georoje Jameson .... 


1586 


1644 




Peter Oliver 


1594 


1654 




Scunuel Cooper .... 
William Dobson .... 


1609 


1672 




1610 


1646 




Henry Stone 


1616 


1653 




Sir Peter Lely 


1618 


1680 




Bobert Walker, painted 1650 . 


— 


1660 




John Biley 


1646 


1691 




Sir Godfrey Kneller . . . 


1646 


1723 




Michael Wright .... 


— 


1700 




Jonathan Bichardson . . . 


1665 


1745 




Charles Jervas .... 


1675 


1739 




Sir James Thomhill . . . 


1676 


1734 




William Hogarth .... 


1697 


1764 




Thomas Hudson .... 


1701 


1779 




F. Zuccarelli 


1702 


1788 




Francis Hayman .... 


1708 


1766 




Bichard Wilson . . . . 


1713 


1782 




Allan Bamsay 


1713 


1784 




George Smitn of Chichester . 


1714 


1766 




Sir Joshna Beynolds . . . 


1723 


1792 




George Stubbs 


1724 


1806 




Francis Cotes 


1725 


1770 




Paul Saodby 


1725 


1809 




Thomas Gainsborough . . 


1727 


1788 




Nathaniel Hone .... 


1730 


1784 




Nathaniel Dance .... 


17.^4 


_ 




Joseph Wright of Derby . . 


1734 


1797 




George Bomney .... 


1734 


1802 




Johann Zoffany .... 


1735 


1810 




John Singleton Copley . . 


1737 


1815 




Benjamin West .... 
P. «f. de Loutherbourg . . 


1738 


1820 


' 


1740 


1812 



OF PAINTING IN ENGLAND, 



253 



School. 




Birth. 


Death. 


^ 


James Barry 

Henry Fnseli 

David Allan 

John Cozens 

John Hoppner 

Fr. Bourgeois 

Henry Baebum .... 

William Blake 

John Opie 

George Horland .... 
Thos. Girtin 


1741 
1741 
1744 
1752 
1753 
1756 
1756 
1757 
1761 
1763 
1773 


1806 
1825 
1796 
1799 
1810 
1811 
1823 
1828 
1807 
1804 
1802 



NOTES TO THE CATALOGUES. 255 



INTRODUCTORY NOTES TO THE 
CATALOGUES. 



•o» 



The following pages are occtipied with the condensed 
or abbreviated catalogues (already referred to in the 
Preface) of all the European Public Galleries of any 
note, and of the chief collections in private mansions 
open to the public in Italy and Holland. 

The writer's object has been to point out the best 
works of the leading masters, especially noting pictures 
which are typical of a style or date or school. It has 
not been deemed necessary to mention all the works 
bearing the names even of the greatest painters. Thus 
some pictures have been omitted : firstly, because, 
although genuine, they are of minor value or unneces- 
sary for the purpose of illustration ; secondly, because 
they are works of doubtful origin about which critics 
are not agreed; and, lastly, because as sometimes 
happens they have no claim whatever to the name by 
which they are catalogued. 

As a striking instance of the last-named error, from 
at least a hundred such which might be mentioned, let 
one be taken from the Hampton Court Gallery, where, 
of all the works ascribed to Palma Vecchio, certainly 
not more than one is genuine. 

On the other hand, when a picture is fine and worthy 
to be observed, although it is obviously not by the 



256 NOTES TO THE CATALOGUES. 

author indicated, the picture is noted, but the words 
" attributed to " are appended. Thus, continuing the 
reference to Hampton Court above named, one of the 
so-called Palma Vecchios is (on the authority of Crowe 
and Cavalcaselle*) a fine Jacopo Bassano. 

For the purpose of enabling the reader to find the 
catalogues easily, they have been arranged in the order 
in which the schools themselves have been considered. 
The Galleries of Italy head the list, and are followed by 
those of Flanders, Holland, Germany, Spain, France, 
England, and Bussia ; and under the heading of each 
country the towns containing Galleries are arranged in 
alphabetical order. 

* Ab heretofore, when the opinion of these emdlte critics is 
specially referred to, the initials (G. and G.) will be appended to 
denote the authority quoted. 



( 257 ) 



CATALOGUES. 



THE PICTUEE GALLERIES OF ITALY. 



>o« 



THE AOCADEMIA OABRABA AT BEB6AM0. 



Bellini, Gentile, attri- 
buted to . . 
Bellini, Giovanni 
Bonconsiglio . . 
Borgognone . . 
Canaletto . 
Crivelli, Carlo 
Diirer, Albrecht . 
Fogolino, Marcello 
Foppa, Vincenzo . 



» 



>» 



} 



Francia, attributed to 
Giorgione, attributed to 



n 



j» 



» 



»» 



Guardi, Francesco 



>» 



?» 



>> 



»> 



Lotto, Loreozo . 

»> »» • 

Mantegna, Andrea 



No. 

— The Portrait of Loredano. — By Catena : 

C. andC. 

— A Madonna. 

— St. Sebastian. 

— Virgin and Child. 
88 A View of Venice. 

194 Madonna and ChUd. 
106 Chrigt hearing the Cross. 
223 Monks chanting a Mass. 
112 The Crucifixion. 

— A St. Jerome. 
104 Ecce Homo. 

157 Portrait of a Lady. — ^By Cariani : 

C. and C. 
171 Portrait— Bj Melone : C. and C. 
187 PoHraU.—Bj Calisto di Lodi: C. and C. 

31 View in Venice. 

32 View in Venice. 
63 View in Venice. 

154 Holy Family. 

222 The Marriage of St. Catharine. 

187 A Madonna. — Small. 



258 



BOLOGNA. 



Marcus Venetus, or Mar- 
co Belli . . . . 
Marziale, Marco . 
Moroni, Giambattista 



» 



»» 



Palma VeccWo 



Piombo, Sebastiano del . 

Raphael, attributed to . 

YelasqueZf Diego, attri- 
buted to ... . 

Velasquez, Diego, attri- 
buted to ... . 

Vicentino, Girolamo . 

Yivarini, Bartolommeo . 



No. 



209 The Madonna in a Landscape. 

— Virgin, Child, and Donor. 
158, 185, 196, 212. Male Portraih. 
185, 196, 221. Female Portraits. 
144 Portrait of a Child. 

156 Virgin and Child with the Baptist and 

the Magdalen. 
191 Portrait. 
135 St. Stephen. 

28 Portrait. 

169 Sketch of a decapitated Head. 

— Christ hearing the Cross. 

218 Virgin and Child. — And another work. 



THE PINACOTECA AT BOLOGNA. 



Albani, Francesco 
Alunno, Niccolb . 
Aspertini, Amico 
Avanzi, Jacopo . 



»» 



»> 



>» 



»» 



Bugiardini, Giuliano 
Oaracci, Agostino 

>» »» • 

Annibale 






»♦ 
Lodovioo 



Oavedone di Sassuolo 
Oima da Gonegliano 
Cossa, Francesco . 



Catalogub of 1876. 

No. 

2 Baptism of Christ. 
360 Panel painted on both sides. 
297 Adoration with Saints and D&nators. 

159 Scenes from the Life of Christ. — Much 
injured. 

160 The Crucifition. 
1,61 An AUdr-piece. 

26 Marriage of St. Catharine. 

34 The Last Communion of St. Jerome. 

35 The Assumption. 

36 Madonna and Child with Saints adoring. 
39, 40. The Annunciation. 
42 Madonna, Child, and Saints. 
45 Birth of John the Baptist— And others. 
55 Virgin amd Child appearing to St. Peter. 
61 A Madonna. 
64 Madonna, Child, and Saints. 



BOLOGNA, 



259 



Costa, Lorenzo 



Domenichino (Zampieri) 
Francia, Francesco 





>» 




9> 




»» 




>» 




»» 




» 




?» 




Giacomo 


Guercino . . . 



Jacopo di Paolo . 
Matteo da Bologna 



»> 



»> 



Parmegianino 
Penigino, Pietro 

Haphael , 
Reni, Guido . 









Simone da Bologna 
Sirani, Elisabetta 
Tiarini, Alessandro 
Vasari, Giorgio . 
Yitale da Bologna 
Viti, Timoteo 
Vivarini, Antonio and 
Bartolommeo . . 



No. 
65 St, Peter as Bishop of Borne and Saints. 

— And others. 
206 The Martyrdom of St. Agnes. 

78 Madonna, Saints, and Donators. 

79 Annunciation with Baptist and St. Jerome. 

80 MadonTia, Baptist, and St. Augustine, 

81 Infant adored by the Virgin, Saints, 

and Donators. 

83 Dead Christ and two Angels. 

371 J%e Annunciation and Saints. 

372 Madonna and Child with St. Paul and 

St, Francis of Assisi. 

373 Crucifixion, 

84 Madonna and Saints. 

13 St. Bruno and his Companion in the 

Desert, — And others. 
10 Hie Crucifixion, 

103 .^ Pieta and Saints. 

104 Madonna and Child, 
116 Madonna and Saints. 

197 Madonna and Child enthroned icilh 

Saints. 
52 St. Cecilia. 

134 Madonna delta Pieta, 

135 Massacre of the Innocents. 

136 Christ Crucified. 

137 Samson Victorious. 

138 Virgin of the Bosary, 

140 St, Sebastian. 

141 Coronation of the Virgin. 

142 Ecce Homo. — Crayon. 
162 Crucifixion and Saints. 

175 St. Anthony adoring the Virgin and Child. 
183 Marriage of St, Catharine. — And others. 

198 St. Gregory the Great and the Poor. 
203 Madonna and Saints, 

214 St Mary Magdalen. 



205 AUar-piece, 



si 



260 BBESCIA AND FEBBARA. 



THE GALLEEIA TOSI OB MUSEO CIVICO AT BBESCIA 

Anterwym, 
No. 

Moretto — Eeee Homo. 

Bomanino — The Supper at Emmaus. — Fresco. 

„ . , . . , — Magdcden in the House of Simon. — 

Fresco. 

Boom I, 
Moretto — An Annunciation.— Small. 

m 

Boom IL 

Lotto, Lorenzo ... — The Nativity. 

Moretto — The Supper at Emmaus. 

Moretto and Moroni . — Portraits. 

Boom III. 

Moretto and Moroni . — Portraits. 

Baphael — CItrist toiih wounded Side. — Small. 

Boonn on the Chownd Floor. 

Moretto — An Altar-piece. 

„ ..... — The Virgin in Glory and Saints. J • 
Moroni — An Altar-piece. 



-^; 



^» 



THE ATENEO AT FEBBAEA- 

Catalogub of 1875. 

All the pictures in this gallery appear to have been recently cleaned 
and varnished. 

No. 
Bononi, Carlo ... 19 The Marriage at Cana. 
Caracci, Annibale . . 38 The Last Supper, 



FLORENCE: THE ACADEMY, 



261 



Carpaocio, Yittore 
Dossi, D0S8O . . 



»» 



Garofalo (Tisio) . 



»» 



♦» 



»» 



»> 



»» 



>» 



Mazzolino, Ludovioo 

Scarsellino 

Tara,Co8iiuo 



»» 



»» 



M 



>» 



Viti, Timoteo 



No. 

37 Th€ Burial of the Virgin. 

46 The AnnuncicUion. 

47 Ifodofina enthroned with Saints. 

63 Tbe Madonna ** deZ Pilaetro.*' 

64 Adoration of the Kir^s. 

65 /eaiM erf Oethsemane. 

68 JfoMocrd 0/ 1^ Innocent. 
— J.(2ora£ton and Saints. 
113 2%6 Marriage at Cana. 

121 iS^. /erome. 

122 8t, Jerome, 

123 ul Dead Christ, 

124 Tfce Assumption of St Mary of Egypt. 



THE ACADEMY OP PINE ARTS AT PLORENCE. 

Oatalogub of 1869. 



Albertinelli, Mariotto 



rt 



>» 



Angelioo, Pra(Pie8ole) 



»> 



»» 



»» 



>» 



»» 



»» 



>♦ 



»» 



>» 



Bartolommeo, Fra (Porta) 



»» 



» 






No. 

70, Salle des Gds. Tableaux. Holy Trinity. 

72 n )) Virgin and 

ChUd enthroned with Saints, 
34, Salle des Gds. Tableaux. Deposition. 
19, Salle des Andens Tableaux. Madonna 

and Child with Saints, 
22, Salle des Anciens Tableaux. Madonna 

and Child with Saints, 
11, Salle des Petits Tableaux. Five small 

Scenes from the Life of Christ. 

40, Salle des Petits Tableaux. An Entomb- 

ment, 

41, Salle des Petits Tableaux. 77^6 Last 

Judgment. 
66, Salle des Gds. Tableaux. Virgin and 

SaifUs, 
69, Salle des Gds. Tableaux. St. Vincent. 
78, Salle des Gds. Tableaux. FoHraiU of 

Saints, — ^And others in fresco. 



262 



FLORENCE: THE ACADEMY. 



Botticelli, Sandro 

Bronzino, Angelo 
Gardi, L. (Cigoli) 



Cimabue . 



• • • 



Credi, Lorenzo di 
Dolci, Carlo . . 
Gaddi, Taddeo . 



*> 



*» 



»» 



9» 



Gentile da Fabriano 



Ghirlandajo, Bomenico 



>» 



Michele 



Giotto di Bondone . 

Giovanni da Milano . 
Lippi, Filippo 



i» 






• • 



Lippi, Fllippino . . 
Lorenzetti, Arabi'ogio 



No. 

52) Salle des Gds. Tableaux. Virgin and 

Child with Saints. 

102, Salle des Gds. Tableaux. Dead Christ. 

115 „ „ St. Francis 

receiving the Stigmata. 

2, Salle des Gds. Tableaux. Virgin and 

Child with eight Angels. 
51, Salle des Gds. Tableaux. The 

Nativity, 
99, Salle des Gds. Tableaux. Eternal 
Father. 
4-13, Salle des Gds. Tableaux. History 
of StFrancis. — Painted after Giotto's 
designs. 
18-29, Salle des Gds. Tableaux. Scenes 
from the Life of Christ. — From de- 
signs by Giotto. 

31, Salle des Gds. Tableaux. An Entomb- 

ment. 

32, Salle des Gds. Tableaux. Adoration of 

the Ma^i. 
50, Salle des Gds. Tableaux. Adoration of 

the Shepherds. 
76, Salle des Gds. Tableaux. Marriage of 

St. Catharine. 

15, Salle des Gds. Tableaux. Virgin and 

Child toith Saints and Angels. 

16, Salle des Gds. Tableaux. Pieta. 

40 „ „ The Madonna 

and four Saints. 

41, Salle des Gds. Tableaux. Coronaiion 

of the Virgin. 

42, Salle des Gds. Tableaux. ThePredella. 
12, Salle des Petits Tableaux. Virgin in 

Adoration toith Saints. 
57, Salle des Gds. Tableaux. A Deposi- 
tion. — ^Lower part by Perugino. 

17, Salle des Gds. Tableaux. The Presen- 

tatfoTi in tlie Tem-ple. 



FLORENCE: THE PITTI. 



263 



I^renzo di Niccolb . 
Niccolo di Pietro 

Spinello Aretino. , 



Masaccio 



Perugino (Vannucci) . 



» 



>» 






»» 



»» 



»» 



Puodo di Simone 
Sarto, Andrea del . 



• • 



Spinello Aretino . . 
Ugolino da Siena 
Verroechio, A. del . . 



No. 

35, Salle des Gds. Tableaux. Certlre Panel. 

— „ „ Panel en 
right of spectator. 

— „ „ Panel on 
left of spectator. 

36, Salle des Gds. Tableaux. Virgin and 
Child, St Anna, and Glory of Angels. 

53, Salle des Gds. Tableaux. The Agony. 

55 „ „ Assumption 

ofihe Virgin, 

56, Salle des Gds. Tableaux. Christ on the 
Cross. 

58, Salle des Gds. Tableaux. Dead Christ. 
18, Salle des Petits Tableaux. Two Pro- 

file Portraits, 
4, Salle des Petits Tableaux. Altar-piece. 
— ^In five compartments. 

59, Salle des Gds. Tableaux. Four Saints. 
63 „ „ ThePredelld 

of No. 59. 

35, Salle des Anciens Tableaux. Altar- 
piece. — In three compartments. 
1, Salle des Anciens Tableaux. Corona- 
tion of the Virgin. 

43, Salle des Gds. Tableaux. Baptism of 
Christ. — The first angel on the left. 
was painted by Leonardo da*Yinci. 



THE PITTI PALACE AT FLORENCE. 
Catalogue op 1868. 

No. 
Albertinelli (Mariotto) . 365 Holy Family. 
AUori, Cristofano (II 
Bronzino) .... 



>? 



Angelico, Fra 



41 Hospitality of St. Julian. 
96 Judith with the Head of HoZQfuxwfij^. 
373 Virgin and CHild miU BaiuU. 



264 



FLORENCE: THE PITTL 



Bartolommeo, Fra . . 



♦» 
»» 



Beocafumi .... 
Bordone, Paris, attri-^ 
buted to ... / 
Bordone, Paris . . 

BotticeUi (Filipepi) . . 



»» 



»» 



Bronzino, Ang:elo 
Oardi» L. (11 GigoU) 



»» 


>» 


» 


»» 


»» 


»» 


Dolci, Carlo 


• 1 


»» ♦» 


» . 


>» »» < 


> . 



»» 



»» 



»» 



V 



Domeniohino (Zampieri) 



»» 



Dossi, Dosso . 
Dughet, Gaspar 



»» 



>» 



♦♦ 



»» 



Diirer, Albrecht 
Dyck, Anton van 



»♦ 



»» 



Francesca, Piero della . 
Francia, Giacomo 
Franciabigio (Maroan- 

tonio) 

Garofalo (Tisio) . . . 



>» 






No. 

64 The Depontian, 
125 St Mark, 

159 Risen Christ with Saints. 
208 Virgin enthroned with Saints. 
256 Holy Family. 
377 Ecee Homo. 
359 Holy Family, 

89 The Repose in Egypt.^ Aacribed b 

some to Bonifazio. 
109 Portrait of a Woman. 
348 Hoiy Family and Angeh. 
353 Portrait of a Young Girl. 
204-206. Portraits. 
51 Deposition, 

90 Ecoe Homo, 
290 St. Francis, 

301 Portrait of a Man. 
154 Sleeping St. John, 

270 Martyrdom of St. Andrew. 

302 Virgin and Child. 

316 Portrait of a Young Man. 

404 Portrait of the Duchess of Rovera. 

176 St. Mary Magdalen. 

461, 476. TuH)smaU Mythological Paintingt 

487 Repose in Egypt. 

421 Landscape, 

436 Xancboope. 

441 Landscape, 

I., 20. ui(2am and Eve. 
82 Portrait of Cardinal Bentivoglio. 
150 Portrait of Charles L and HenrietU. 

Maria. 
371 Female Portrait. 
195 Jfa2e Portrait. 

43 JfoZe Portrait. 
5 iSt. James, 
246 Xa ZingareUa. 
363 Ho2y JFVzm%. 



FLOBENCE: THE PITTI. 



265 



»» 



No. 

358 Adoraiion of the Kings. 

185 A Concert 

161 Finding of Moses.— la a fiae Bonifazio : 

G. and G. 
99 St. Sebastian. 

156 The Virgin ''with the Swallow.' 
255 Male Portrait. 



Ghirlandajo, Domenioo . 

Giorgioue (Barbarelli) . 

„ attri-| 

buted to . . . / 

Guercino (Barbieri) . . 



»» 



»» 



Heist, Bart, yan der . , 

Holbein, Hans, younger, 
attributed to . . . 

Hondecoeter, M. . . 

Huysum, Jan yan 

Lippi, FiHppo . . . 

Lotto, Lorenzo . 

Maratta, Garlo 

Michael Angelo (Buon- 
arroti), attributed to . 

Morone, Domenico 

Murillo . . 



223 Male Portrait. 
400 D&mesHc Poultry. 
462 Flowers and Fruit 
338 Virgin and Child. 
157 The Three Ages of Man.- 
71 St PhUip Neri. 



-Damaged. 



»» 



Palma Yecchio 



>» 



»> 



>» 



»> 



Parmegianino (Mazzuuli) 
Perugino (Vannucci) 



ft 



»« 
»» 






Perozzi, Baldasare . . 
Pintnricohio, Bernardino 
Pollajuolo, Antonio . . 
Pontormo (Garucci) . 
Pordenone, Giov. Ant^ 
attributed to . . . 
Pourbus, Franz, younger. 
Raphael Sanzio . . . 



>» 


» 


»» 


»» 


»» 


>» 



113 The Fates. 

128 Female PoHrait 

40 Virgin and Child. 

56 Virgin of the Bosary. 

38 The Pilgrims at Emmaus. 

84 Holy Family. 
254 Holy Family. 
230 The Virgin *'au long cm.' 

42 St Mary Magdalen. 
164 The Deposition. 
219 Virgin and St John adoring the Infant 

Christ 
345 Holy Family. 
341 Adoration of the Magi. 
384 St Sebastian. 
149 Portrait of Ippolito di Medici. 

52 Virgin and Saints. 
244 PoHrait 
59 Portrait of Maddalene Doni. — Early 

work. 
61 Portrait of Angelo Doni. — Early work. 
63 Portrait of Pope Leo X. 
79 The Madonna deUa Sedia, 



266 



FLORENCE: THE PITTL 



Baphacl Sanzio 









Kembratidt van Eyn 



>♦ 



»> 



Beni, Guido . 
Bibera, Jose . 
Bosa, Salvator 






»» 



Bubeus, P. P. 



>» 



Buysch, Bachel 
Buysdael, Jacob 
Sarto, Andrea del (Van- 
nucchi) . 



»» 



»> 



»> 



»» 



(attributed 






to) 



Scarsella (Lo Scarsellino) 
Scbastiano del Piombo . 



No. 

94 Holy Family " delV Impannata." 
151 Portrait of Pope Julius II. 
158 Portrait of Cardinal Bernard de 

Bihhiena, 
165 2%« Madowna " del Baldacchinoy 
171 Portrait of Tommaso Inghirami. 
174 Fision o/ Ezekiel. 
266 T^ Madonna " del gran Duca." 

16 Portrait of an Old Man. 

60 His own Portrait. 
178 C^|)atra. 

19 Martyrdom of St. BartJiolomew, 
111 ConspirOfCy of Catiline. 
133 Battle, 
135 ^ateZe. 
188 J2m oion Portrait. 
306 XamZscope. 
453 Pea,ce burning Arms. 
470 Diogenes, 

85 ^*8 oton Portrait, that of his Brother 

and those of Lipsius and GrotiuK, 

86 The Effects of War. 
455 Flowers and Fruit. 
465 Landscape, 

58 Deposition, 

62 J3bZ^ Family, 
■ 81 fibZ^ Family. 

118 5m own Portrait and that of his Wife 
123 Ftr^tntn Glory with four Saints. — Th 

lower part inferior. 
172 The Dispute on the Trinity. 
184 A PoHrait, 
191 Assumption of the Virgin. 
225 Assumption of the Virgin. 
265 John the Baptist. 
307 Virgin and Child with Saints. 
394 BiHh of a Child. 
179 Martyrdom of St. Agatha, 



FLORENCE: THE UFFIZL 



267 



Sebastiano del Piombo . 


No. 

409 Male Portrait 


Siistermans, JiiRtus . 
Tintoretto (Robusti). 




190 Portrait of Frederick IWs Son. 
3 Vulcan, Venus, and Cupid. 
65 Maie Portrait. 


» >» ' 




131 PoHrait of Vincent Zeno. 


Titian (Vecellio) . . 

>» »> 




248 Deposition. — And others. 
17 Marriage of St. Catharine. 
, 18 Titian*8 Mistress. 


»» » • 




54 Portrait of Aretino. 


>» »» • 

5» »» 




67 TheMagdaJ^. 
. 80 Portrait of Vesalius. 
92 Male Portrait. 


„ atthbat€ 


)dU 


. 201 Portrait of Ippolito di Medici. 
:> 423 Jestts adored by the Shepherds. — This is 
an undoubted work of Girolamo 




Savoldo : 0, and C. 


Velasquez, Diego, at 

buted to , . 
Veronese, Paolo . 


tri- 

• 

9 


. 243 Equestrian Portrait of Philip IV. 
. 186 Baptism of Christ. 



>» 



»» 



Vinci, Leonardo da . 



269 Presentation in the Temple. 
140 FevnaU Portrait. — Known as 'Leo- 
nardo's Nun.' 



THE ROYAL GALLERY OF THE UFFIZI AT FLORENCE. 

Catalogue of 1869. 

No. 



Albani, Francesco 



»> 



Albert inelli, Mariotto 
AUori, Cristofaiio 
Angolico, Fra 



»i 



5? 



?^ 



55 



J» 



1044 Dance of the Genii. 
1094 The Rape of Ewropa. 
1259 The Visitation. 
1285 Adoration of the Kings, 

17 Virgin and Child. 
1162 Birth of John the Baptist. 
1178 Marriage of the Virgin .) Predellas of 
1184 Deai^ of the Virgin . .) No. 1290. 
1290 The Coronation of the Virgin, 
1294 The Predella of No. 17. 



268 



FLORENCE: THE UFFIZL 



Baroocio, Federigo 



»> 



»> 



»» 



»♦ 



Bartolommeo, Fra 



»» >» 

» »> 

>» >» 



»> 



>» 



»» 



» 



» 



»♦ 



Bellini, Gioyanni 
Bonifazio . 
Bordone, Paris 

»» >» 

Botticelli, Sandro 









Bassano (Jaoopo da 

Ponte) . . 
Bega, Comelis 



Bronzino, Angelo 

Brouwer, Adrian 

»> • 

Brueghel, Jan (Velours) 



»» 



>» 



n 



Brueghel, Pieter, elder . 
Bagiardini . . . . 
Ganale, Antonio (Oana- 

letto) 

Garaoci, Annihale . . 
Cardi, Lodovlco (Cigoli). 
Ghimenti, Jaoopo 
Gorreggio (AUegri) . . 



»» 



»» 



No. 

169 Madonna interceding for the Poor. 

212 A Noli me tangere, 

1119 PoHrcUt of the Duke of Urhino. 

1126 The Prophet Isaiah, 

1130 Job. 

1161 Two smcM Paintings. 

1265 Virgin and Child enthroned with Saints. 

— ^In grisaille. 

593 Moses and the Burning Bush. 

726 Oroup of Players. 

886 The Gipsy. 

969 A Man playing the Lute. 

986 A Woman playing the Lute. 

583 Dead Christ. — In grisaille. 

628 The Last Supper. 

607 Portrait 

613 Portrait 
39 The Birth of Venus, 
1156, 1158. Judith and Holofemes. 
1182 Calumny. 

1267 bis. Virgin and Child with Angels. 
1286 Adoration of the Kings. 
1289 Madonna eroumed by Angels. 

1266 Male Portrait 

1271 The Descent into Limbo. 
955 Peasants. 
959 Drinkers. 
761 Landscape. 
884 The Four Elements. 
892 Jesus hearing the Cross. 

213 The Madonna Nursing. 

1064 View of the Ducal Palace. 

1133 A Bacchante. 

1276 Martyrdom of St. Stephen^ 
1261 St Ives, Protector of Orphans. 
1118 The Repose in Egypt 

1134 Virgin adoring the Infant Christ, 



FLORENCE: THE UFFIZL 



269 



Cranach, or Kranaoh, 
Lucas . . . 



>» 



Credi, Lorenzo di 



?i 



»» 



i» 



» 



Denner, Balthasar 
Domenichmo (Zampieri) 
Domenico Veneziauo 
DoBsl, Dosso . 
Dow, Gerhard 
Durer, Albrecht 



»> 
»» 
>» 



»» 



Dyck, Anton van 



» 



>» 



Francia, Francesco . 
GreMe, Claude (Lorraine) 



»» 



» 



»> 



Ghirlandajo, Domenico . 

»» « 

Ghirlandajo, Bidolfo. . 

>» 
Giorgione . 



»» 



>» 



„ attributed to . 
Giottino (Tomaso di 

Stefano) 

Goes, Hugo van der . 
Guercino (Barbieri) . . 



>» 



»> 



Hey den, Jan van der 
Holbein, Hans . . 



>» 



attributed to . 
Honthorst, Gerard van . 



Ho. 



847 Fort/raits of Luther and Melancthon. 
1138, 1142. Adam and Eve, 

1160 Annunciation of 1^ Virgin. 
1163 Portrait of Andrea Verrocchio. 
1160, 1166, 1168, 1287 are good examples. 

764 Portrait of a Man. 

1109 Portrait of Cardinal Agucchia. 
1305 Virgin a/nd Child with Saints. 

995 Maasaere of the Innocents. 

786 The SehooJmagter. 

766 PoHrait of an Old Man. 

777 6t. James the AposUe. 

851 Virgin and Child. 
1141 Adoration of the Kings. 
1115 Portrait of John Montfort. 
1128 Portrait of Charles V. on a %rhit& 

Horse, 
1124 Portrait of Scappi. 

774 Sea-port at Sunset. 

848 Landscape. 

1295 Adoraiion of the Kings. 
1297 Virgin and Child with Saints. 
1275 Miracle of St. Zenobius. 
1277 Bemoval of the Body of St. Zenobius. 
' 621 Legend of Moses. 

630 Judgment of Solomon. 

622 Portrait of a Knight of Malta. 

7 The Deposition. 

698 Virgin and Child. 
1114 The Sibyl Samia. 
1137 Endymion Asleep. 

891 View in Amsterdam. 

765 Portrait of Richard Southwell.— There 

is a replica of this in the Louvre, 

No. 212. 
784 Portrait of Zuinglius. 
148 The Supper. 



270 



FLORENCE: THE UFFIZL 



Horemans, Pieter 
Lanfranco, Giovanni 
Leiden, Lucas van 
Lippi, Filippo 



»> 



>♦ 



Lippi, Filipplno 



»» 



»> 



Lotto, Lorenzo 
Luini, Bernardino 
Mantegna, Andrea 



»i 



»? 



Martini, Simone, and^ 



Lippo Memmi . 
Masaccio, attributed 
Memling, Hans . 



to . 



»» 



»» 



Metsu, Gabriel 



» 



»> 



Michael Angelo (Buon- 
arroti) . 
Mieris, Frans van 









Mignard, Pierre . 



»i 



»» 



Milano, Giovanni da 
Moretto (Bonvicini) 
Moroni, Gio. Battista 



»» 



»j 



>» 



>» 



Neefd, Pieter . . . 



»> 



»» 



Neer, Eglon van der 
Palma Vecchio . . 



ff 



99 



No. 

886 Card Players. 
1106 8t Peter. 

1143 Christ crowned with Thorns. 
1179 St. Augustine. 
1307 Virgin and Child with Angels. 
1257 Adoration of the Kings. 
1268 Madonna and Child imth Saints. 

575 A Holy Family. 
1135 Beheadal of John the Baptist. 
1025 Virgin and Child on a Rock. 
1111 Triptych. 

8, 9, 10. Annunciation of the Virgin wit) 
two Saints. 
1167 Portrait of an Old Man. 

703 Virgin and Child. 

769 Male Portrait. 

918 Domestic Scene. 

972 A Lady and a Cavalier. 

1139 Holy Family. 
854 The Charlatan. 
941 A Young Woman. 
945 T^ Repast. 
952 2%e OW JDover. 
954 The Drinkers. 
976 fli'g oion Portrait. 
981 2%6 Painter and his Family. 
670 -4 Portrait. 
688 <4 Portrait. 
1293 ^n Altar-piece. 
592 The Death of Adonis. 
586 JJfaZe Portrait. 
629 JJfaZe Portrait. 
642 JJfoZe Portrait. 
702 JnteWor o/ a Church. 
717 Interior of a Church. 
893 Landscape. 

619 Judith. — Much injured by restoring. 
650 Portrait o/ a Miithemafctcian. 



FLORENCE: THE UFFIZL 



271 



Paris Bordone 
Perugino (Vannucci) 
Piero di Cosimo . 
Piero della Francesca 

Piombo, Sebastiano del 



PoUajuolo, Antonio 

>» ?» 

Pontormo (Carucci) 

»» »> 

Raphael Sanzio . 



*« 



»> 



attri- 



buted to 



Baphael Sanzio 



»' 



»» 



>j 



»» 



No. 

613 Male Portrait 
1122 Virgin and two Saints. 
1250 A Conception and Saints. 

1300 Portraits of the Duke of Urhino and of 
his Wife. 

627 A Warrior. — The authorship is ques- 
tioned : C. and C. 

1301 Three Saints. 
1306 Figure of Prudence. 
1198 Birth of St. John the Baptist. 
1284 Venus hissed by Love. 
1120 Portrait of a Young Woman. 
1123 Portrait of the Fomarina. — Believed 

to be by Sebastiano del Pioiubo : 
C. and C, and others. 
1125 The Madonna '' deil Pozzo." 
1127 St. John in the Desert. 
, 1129 The Madonna of the Goldfinch. 
, 1131 Portrait of Pope Julius IL 
Eflzzi, or Bazzi (II So- 

doma) 1279 St, Sebastian. 

Rembrandt van Ryn . 922 Domestic Interior. 

„ . 979 Landscape. 

998 Virgin and Child vnth St. John. 
1113 A Madonna. 
1104 St. Jerome, 
1144 The Virgin and Child. 
1005 Landscape. 
140 BaUleoflvry. 
147 Entry of Henry IV. into Paris. 
197 Portrait of his Wife: 
812 Venus and Adonis. 
1140 Hercules between Vice and Virtue. 
953 Fruit and FUywers. 
Sarto, A. del (Vaiinucchi) 1112 Virgin and Child with 8aint». 

1169 Portrait of a Young Man. — Restored. 
1176 His own Portrait. 
1254 St. James and ivno Cliild.Tei\.. 
Sassoferrato (Sulvi) , , 191 The Sorrovoin^ Virgin, 



»» 



Reui, Guido 



»» 



Ribera, Jos€ . 
Romano, Giulio 
Rosa, Salvator 
Rubens, P. P. 



<* 



?» 



»< 



Ruysch, Rachel 



5» 



»' 



»» 



»» 



»» 



272 



FLORENCE: THE UFFIZL 



Savoldo, Girolamo 
Schalken, Gkxifried 
Signorelli, Luca . 

Slingeland, Pieter V 
Steen, Jan . . 
Teniera, D., elder 
Terburg, Gerard . 
Tintoretto (Bobusti) 
Titian (Veeellio) . 



It 

11 



11 

n 

19 

11 
11 
11 
11 
11 
11 
11 
11 
11 
11 



Uocello, Paolo 
Velasquez, Diego, attri 

buted to 
Vernet, C. J. . 
Veronese, Paolo (Caliari) 



j> 



>» 



»♦ 



>» 



» 



>» 



Vinci, Leonardo da, at- 
tributed to . . 
Vinoi, Leonardo da 
Volterra, Daniele da, 
Vos, Martin de . 
Watteau, Antoine 
"Werff, Adrian van der 



ff 



» 



Wejden, Bogier van der . 



No. 

645 The Tranafiguraiion, 
934 Woman Sewing hy CandUUght, 
36 Madonna and Child and Shepherds, 
1291 Holy FamUy, 
888 The Soap-hubbles. 
977 TheBepasL 
705 The Doctor. 
958 A Dutch Lady. 
638 Portrait of Sansovino. 
590 Virgin and Child, 
599 Portrait of the Duchess of Urhino, 
605 Portrait of the Duke of Urhino. 
609 Study for the Battle of Cadore, 
614 Portrait of Giovanni di Medici. 
618 Virgin and Child. — ^Unfinished. 

625 Virgin and Child unth St. Catharine. 

626 The Flora. 

633 Virgin and ChUd, 

648 Portrait of Catharine Comoro. 
1002 Virgin and ChUd.— Small. 
1108 Venus. 

1116 Portrait of the PreUUe Beccadelli. 

1117 Venus. 

29 A Combat of Knights. 

210 Equestrian Portrait of Philip IV. 
655, 665. Examples. 
596 Esther before Ahasuerus. 
603 Man*s Head. 
1186 HcHy Family with St. Catharine. 

57 A Portrait 
1252 Adoration of the Kings. — Unfinished. 
1107 jT^ Massacre of the Innocents. 

811 The Cruoifixum. 

671 CavaJiers and a Lady. 

905 The Judgment of Solomon. 

985 Adoration of the Shepherds. 

795 The Entombmeut. 



GENOA, 273 



Two rooms are occupied with the portraits of ancient and modern 
painters of all schools, presumed to be painted by themselyes, which, 
however, is not the case in all instances. This interesting collection 
contains nearly 350 canvases : some of them are masterly studies. The 
numbers commence at 225 and end at 571, and the names ci the most 
cel^rated ancient masters— beginning with Masaccio and Leonardo, 
and ending with men of the present time — are given in alphabetical 
order in the catalogue of the gallery. 



THE PALAZZO BBIGNOLI OB B0S8I AT GENOA. 

Boom L 
No. 

Guereino — Cleopatra, 

Bubens — Jtfors, Venus, and Cupid. 

Stanza di Primavera, 

Bordone — Portrait of a Man in Bed Sleeves, 

And others. 

Horetto — Portrait of a Botanist. 

Van Dyck .... — Portraits, 

Boom UL 

Caravaggio .... — Baising of Lazarus, 
Guereino — Death of Cato. 

Boom IV. 

Bonifazio ..... — Adoration of the Kings, 

Guereino — Holy Family and Saints, 

Sarto, Andrea del . . — Holy Family. 

Bo<m V. 

Van Dyck .... — Christ and the Pharisees, 
Veronese — Juditfc. 



274 MANTUA. 



Boom VI. 
No. 
Van Dyck .... — Portraits, 



There are seyeral smaller coHections of pictures inlbe fialaoetoC 
Genoa "vrhich are open to tlie trayeller, each as the Falaszo Beale, the 
Palazzo Balbi, the Palazzo Dnrazzo della Scala, the Palazzo Spinola, 
the Palazzo Adomo, and the Palazzo Doria. In these are a few good 
plctnres, and many also which are inferior. Several excellent portraits 
by Tan Dyck are scattered throughout these galleries, which oontain 
besides chiefly examples of the eclectic and naturalistic schools of Italy. 



THE PALAZZO DEL TE AT MANTUA 

Contains much work of Giulio Bomano. 

Camera dei CaraUi. — Six life-size Horses by G. Bomano. 

Camera di Psyche. — Decorated by G. Romano. 

Other rooms follow, containing frescoes as well as friezes designed 
by G. Bomano and exe<^uted by Primatic<'io. 

Sala dei Giganti. — Decorated in part by G. Bomano, but chiefly by 
Binaldo Mantovano. 

In all these works G. Bomano's scholars largely shared. 



THE DUCAL PALACE AT MANTUA. 
Numerous apartments decorated by G. Bomano and scholars. 



THE CASTELLO DI COBTI AT MANTUA. 
In the Council-room are frescoes by Andrea Mantegna. 



MILAN. 



275: 



THE AMBBOSIANA AT MILAN. 



Luini, BeraariKno 



Bassano, Jacopo . 
Oesare da Sesio . 
Doasi, I>0B80 « . 
Bapkael . . . 



Titian .... 
Vinci, Leonardo da 



8ala deUa Santa Corona. 

No. 
. — A grand Fresco of Christ crowned vsith 
Thorns, 

First Flow, 

. — The Repose during the Flight 

— Head of Christ. 
. — Wcuihing the Feet. 
. — Cartoon for the Victory of Constantine in 

the Vatican. 
. — The Adoration of the Shepherds. 
. — Portrait in red chalk of Bianoa Maria^ 

second Wife of Maximilian I. of 

Austria, 



Alunno, Kiccolb 
Bellini, Gtentile 



Giovanni 
Bellotti, Bernardo 



»» 



» » • 

Bonifazio Yeneziano. 



j> 



w 



Bonsignori, Francesco 

Brueghel, J. (Velours) 
Cairo, Francesco del. 



THE BBERA AT MILAN. 

Catalogue of 1875. 

No. 
. . 146,159,160,176,177,197,198. An Altar- 
piece in fourteen parts. 
, 155 St. Mark preaching in Alexandria. — 

Fiuidhed by Giovanni Bellini. 
. 312 Madonna and Child. 
. 205 Landscape, 
. 206 Landscape. 

363 The Finding of Moses. 

427 Christ and His Disciples at Emmaus. 

175 St. Louis and St. Bernard, loith MonO' 

gram of Christ. 
235 A Birds' Concert. 
387 His own Portrait. 

T 2 



276 



MILAN: THE BRER A. 



Cariani, Giovanni 
Garpaccio, Vittore 
Cima da Gonegliano 



» 



»» 



»» 



»> 



Crivelli, Carlo 



♦» 



» 



» »> 

Domenichino . 

Doflsi, DoBso . 

Dyck, A. van 

Ferrari, Gaudenzio 



»> 



»» 



Foppa, Vineenzo . 
Francia, Francesco 
Gentile da Fabriano 

»» »» 

Giotto di Bondone 

Guercino, Barbieri 

Lotto, Lorenzo . 



»i 



»» 



»> 



>» 



Luini, Bernardino . 



Manteonia. Andrea . 



»» 



»» 



Montagna, Bartolomtneo . 
Moretto (Bonvicino) 









»» 



Morone, Francesco . 
Moroni, Giov. Battista . 









No. 

188 Jlfaclonna, Child, and seven Saints. 

234 St. Stephen disputing with the Doctors. 

169 St. Peter Martyr and Saints. 

289 St. Peter in Glory. 

320 St. Jenyme. 

149 Madonna and Child toith Saints. 

151 St. Jerome and St. Augustine. 

199 Madonna and Child. 

94 The Madonna Enthroned. 
354 St. Sebastian. 

81 Madonna and St. Anthony. 

24 J.{2ora^ton of the Kings (in fresco). — 
And many other good ones in freeoo. 
447 T^e Martyrdom of St. CaOiarine. 

69 St. Sebastian. 
343 The Annunciation. 
147 Glorification of the Virgin. 
166,. 167, 170, 171. Four Saints. 
192 Virgin and Child. 
319 The Turning away of Hagar. 

369 Portrait of a Young Lady. . 

370 Portrait of an Old Man. 

371 Portrait cf a Man. 

329 Madonna and Child (in oil). — And 

several good examples in fresco. 
350 Dead Christ and Marys. 

168 St. Luike and other Saints. 

158 Ah Altar-piece — Virgin, Child, and 

Saints. 
129" Virgin in Glory vrith Saints. 
137 Saints. 

139 St. Jerome and an Apostle. 
141 St. Francis of Assist. 
884 The Assumption. 

169 Madonna and Saints. 
123 Assumption 

309 Virgin a7id Child. 
332 Portrait. 
367 Portrait. 



MODENA, 



211 



Murano, John and An- 
tonio di (Vivarini) , 
Palma Veoohio . 
Previtali . 
Raphael Sanzio . 
Reni, Guido . . 
Komanino, attributed to 
Rubens, P. P. . 
Savoldo, Girolamo 

Sesto, Oesare da . 
Signorelli, Luca . 
Solario, Andrea . 



»> 



>» 



Stefano da Ferrara 



Titian . . . 
Veronese, Paolo 



»» 



>» 



Vinci, Leonardo da 
Viti, Timoteo 



No. 



179 Virgin and Saints, 

79 8t, HdeUy 8t Constantine, and others, 
301 Christ on the Mount 
334 Marriage of the Virgin — Lo SposaZizio. 
355 8t. Paid and St Peter. 
128 Virgin adoring the Infant Christ 

91 The Last Supper. 

142 Madonna enthroned with Saints and 
Angels. 

323 Madmina and Child. 

324 Flagellation of our Lord. 
322 MalePoHrait, 

325 Madonna and Child with Saints. — Be- 

toached. 
195 Madonna and Child enthroned with 
Saints, 
75 St Jerome in the Desert. 
144 St Antonio toith Saints. 
184 Christ in the House of the Pharisee. 
328 Ecce Homo. — In fresco. 
164 Annunciation and two Saints. 



THE GALLERIA ESTENSE AT MODENA. 
Catalogue op 1875. 



Abate, Niccol6 dell* . 



« ♦» • 

Bonifazio Veneziano . 
Canale, Antonio . 
Caravaggio (Amerighi) 

»♦ »» 

Caroto, Francesco 



No. 

67, 71, 78, 83, 88, 89, 94, 95. 100. Nine of 
the twelve Cantos of the Eneid. — In bad 
condition. 
107 A Concert with Portraits. 
141 Adoraiion of the Ma^i. 
241 A Sea-port. 
205 An Officer Drinking. 
212 An Officer Drinking. 

50 Virgin, Child, and St. John. 



278 



NAPLES: THE MUSEUM. 



Cavedone (Giacomo di 

Sassaolo) . 
Cima da Goaegliano 
Correggio (Autonio 

legri) . 
Dossi, Dossr> 



»» 



?j 



»» 



» 



» 



»> 



esco 



Francia, Frau< 
Garofalo (Tisif)) . 



»> 



»» 



Al- 



Gelee, Claude (Lorraine) 
Giorgione, attributed to . 
Gueroino (Barbieri) . . 
Pagano, Gaspar . 
Palma Vecehio, attri-"i 
buted to. ... / 
PoUajuolo, Antonio . 
Beni, Guido . 
Scarsellino 
Spada, Lionello . 
Tintoretto 

Tommaso da Modena 



No. 



397 the Crucifixion. 
14S A Deposition. 

60 The Bape of Ganymede. 
173 Portrait. 
176 The Nativity. 
181-184. Genre Scenes. 
366 Madonna with 8S. Michael and George. 

36 The Annunciation. 

189 Madonna and Saints. 

190 Madonna and Saints. 
237 Landscape, 

123 Portrait of a Young Lady. 

355 The Marriage of St. Catharine. 

404 The Marriage of St Catharine. 

129 Virgin and Child with Saints. — An 

injured copy : C. and 0. 
57 St. Sdnistian. 
149 Christ on tlte Cross. 

— Several. 

— Several. 

108-112, 115-118. Paintings of Ovid^s Mela- 
morphoses. 
32 Altar-piece in six parts. — ^Much re- 
painted. 



THE NAPLES MUSEUM. 

OATAIiOGUES IN THE BOOMS VERY IMPERFECT AND OLD. 

Pictures examined in 1875. 
Room IIL — Parma and Genoese Schools. 

No. 
Schidone . . . . ; — Several examples. 

Boom IV. — Lombard School. 
Oesare da Seato ... 17 Adoratiou of fUe K.wii%. 



napl:^: tse museum. 



279 



Parmegianino 
Schidone . 



No. 

— Two Portraits. 

— Seyeral examples. 



Eoom V. — Venetian School, 



Moretto (Bonyioino). . 
Sebastiano del Piombo . 

Vivarini, Loigi , . . 



39 Chritt at the CJolumn, 
8 Head of a Monk.-^A portrait of Pope 

Clement : 0. and 0. 
4 Madonna arid two Monies, 



Sola di Oorreggioy or Saikt dei Capi a Scucia. « 

Ck>rreggio 3 The Madonna delta Zingarella, 

« 7 Marriage of St. Catharine. — Small. 

9 ^ Pieta.—A study. 

Piombo, Sebastiano del . 2 Madonna and Child. 

Spagnoletto .... 12 St. Sebastian. 

Titian 5 The Danae. 

„ 8 Portrait of Paul III. and Attenda/nts. 

„ 11 PortraU of Philip 11. of Spain. 

Sola di RaphaeilOf or Sola dei Capi a Scuda. 



Bellini, Giovanni . . 
Diirer, A., attributed to . 



Rapbael, attributed to . 



»» 



»» 



?> 



»? 



Romano, Giulio . . . 



33 The Transfiguration. 

28 Adoration of the Kings. — TMs belongs 
to some Flemisb master of the be- 
ginning of the sixteenth century. 

18 Portrcdt of TibaZdio. 

20 Madonna del Divino Amore. — ^Painted 

by Giulio Bomano, or by some other 
pupil. 

21 Leo X and Cardinals. — A copy by 

Andrea del Sarto. 

22 Portrait of Cardinal Passerini. 

17 Madonna delta Gatta. — A ^re.i^A.^<:s^ ^sOk 
the Perla oi'Ra^\iaj^«X»'^&aa»a^ 



280 



NAPLES: THE MUSEUM. 



No. 
Van Eyok, attributed to. Si St. Jerome. — ^The work of some Flemish 

master. 



Bartolommeo, Fra 
Caracci, Annibale 
Claade Gelee (Lorraine) 
Garofalo . . 
Giordano, Luca 
Guido Beni . 
Palma Veochio 
Parmegianino. 



»» 



Pintnriochio . 
Piombo, Seb. del 
Titian . . . 



>» 




Vivarini, Bartblommeo 



The Sola Grande. 

60 Assumption. — ^Injured by restoration. 
10 A Pieta. 

31 An Egerian Landscape. 
25 A Deposition. 
38 Madonna and Saints. 
46 The Bace of Atalanta. 
27 Madonna and Saints. 
7 A Portrait. 

40 Portrait of his Daughter. — And others. 
83 An Assumption. 
55 A Portrait. 
17 Study for a large Picture. 
21 The Weeping Magdalen. 
35 Madonna and Child with four Saints. 



HaU of (he Caracci, or Bolognese School. 



Garaoci, Agostino 
„ Annibale 
„ Lodovico 

Guido Beni . . 



lianfranco 



• . . 



— One example. 

2 Holy Family. — ^And others. 

— Two examples. 

44 The Nausicaa. — ^Frcan the history ol 
Ulysses. 

— Several. 



Andrea Sabbatini 
Salerno 



99 



» 



Andrea Solano 

Zingaro) . 

Giordano, Luca 

Simone Papa , , 



Boom of the Neapolitan Schools. 
, or da 



(Lo 



32 An Adoration. 

23 Mira^sles of S. Nicola da Bari. 

33 Saints and Doctors of the Church. 

6 Virgin urith Saints. 
— Several examples. 
31 St Michael with Saints. 



FABUA AND PABMA. 281 



Boom L — German Schools. 

Na 
Cranach, Lucas, attri- 
buted to .... 29 Portrait of Emperor Maximilian,* 
Holbein, Hans, attri- 
buted to ... . 7 Portrait of a Cardinal,* 
* The authorship of both these is probably unknown. 

Last Boom. — Flemish and Dutch Schools. 



Mierevelt ..... IS A Portrait 
Bembrandt .... 1 A Portrait 
And a few other examples of Dutch masters. 



THE MUSEO OIVICO AT PADUA. 

There is little here worth seeing, except the following : 

No. 
Mansueti (attributed to 

Gentile Bellini) . — Adoration of the Magi. — ^Early. 

Bomanino .... — An Altar-piece — McuUmna and Saints. 

„ .... — The Last Supper. 

Squarcione .... — An Altar-piece of St Jerome. 



THE PINACOTECA AT PABMA. 

No. 
Cima da Conegliano . . — Madonna and Saints. 

„ „ . . — Virgin enthroned with Saints. 

Correggio (Antonio 

Allegri) 81 The Madonna **deUaScala.** -In fteaco. 

„ 350 The Madonna della ScodeUa. 

„ 351 The Madonna di San Girolamo — "IZ 

Cfiomo.'* 

„ 352 The Deposition, 

„ 353 Jtfarti/rd<mio/SS. Flamaa'iw3i.YVw^^>»A. 



^2 



PEBUOIA. 



Francia, Francesco . 



»♦ 



>» 



Holbein, Hans . 
Mante^a, Andrea 

Parmegianino 

Piombo, Sebastiano del . 

Toscbi and hia pupils . 



No. 

— The San VitaU Madonna. 

— The Deposition. 

— Portrait of Erasmus. 

— Drawings for the Frescoes in (he 

Eremitani. 

— The Marriage of St. Catharine, 

— Pope Clement giving the Blessing. 

— Drawings of Oorreggio's works in the 

churches and elsewhere at Parma. 



A large portion of the paintings here were unfortunately inyicdble 
when the writer visited Parma in 1875, as the gallery was at that time 
undergoing repair; and on this account only the works mentioned 
above were to be seen, which, however, are the gems of the 
collection. 



THE PINACOTECA AT PERUGIA. 



No. 



Alonno, Niccolo . 


• • 


75 The Annunciation. 


Bonfigli, Benedetto . 


— Several examples. 


Eusebio di S. Giorgio 


8 Adoration of the Magi. 


Fiorenzo di Lorenzo . 


— Several examples. 


Lo Spagua . . . . 


24 Virgin, Child, and Saints. 


Perugino . 






2 The Transfiguration. — In fresco. 


>» 






. 22 The Nativity. 


>» • 






33 Madonna and Saints. 


»> 






37 AUar-piece. 


»» 






39 Altar-piece. 


»» 






43 Tlie Baptism in the Jordan. 


Pintoriochio 






31 Altar-piece in several compartments 



*^* Especially must be seen a fresco by Eaphael in a former chapel 
adjoining the Church of San Severo. The lower part of the fresco was 
subsequently added by Perugino. 



PISA AND ROME. 



283 



THE SALA DEL CAMBIO AT PERUGIA. 

Decorative fresCoeB by Perugino, comprising a * Nativity ' and * Trans- 
figucatioD,* Sibyls, Prophets, and Sages. 

Also Peruginu's own portrait at the age of 54. 

In a chapel beyond are frescoes by Giamiccola Manni. 



THE ACCADEMIA AT PISA. 

There are few pictures worth seeing. The following must be noted : 



Bamaba of Modena 



»> » 

Benozzo Gozzoli . 



»» 



»» 



Simone Martini, or da 
Sieoa ..... 



< 



No. 

— An Altar-piece — Virgin and Child en- 

throned with AngeU. 

— Two wings of another Altar-piece. 

— A Conception, 

— Virgin and Child between Saints. 
A portion of a great Altar-piece of St. 

Catharine of Pisa, consisting of the 
seventh panel {the other six are in the 
Library of the Seminario Vescovile) 
with the whole of the pediment con-- 
taining several Saints, 



THE CAMPO SANTO AT PISA. 

See text, p. 7. 



THE ACCADEMIA DI SAN LUCA AT ROME. 

No Cataloocb. 

Pictures examined in 1875. 

No. 
Dughet, Caspar (Pous- 

Bin) II Bacchw and Ariodive. 



284 



ROME: THE B0BQHE8E. 



Guido Cagnacci 
Guido Beni . 



»9 



>» 



Baphael . 



»> 



Romano, Ginlio . . 
Titian, attributed to . 

Van Dyck . . . 



No. 

25 Tarquin and Luorezia. 
27 Figure of Fortune, 

— Bacchus and Ariadne, 

26 A Child.— Jn fresco. 

15 8t, Luke painting the Virgin. — Attri- 
buted to Raphael, who had probably 
a little to do with it Ascribed to 
Timoteo Viti by 0. and 0. 
6 Copy of Rapha^ets Galatea, 

29 CaUisto and Nymphs. — Part lost, and 
much injured. 

13 Holy Family, 



THE VILLA ALBANI AT ROME. 

In the Gfklleria Nobile the ceiling is painted by Raphael Mengs 
the subject is the * Parnassus.' 
In an adjacent room : 



No. 



Perugino, Pietro 



■ — An Adoration, and other subjects. 



THE BABBEBINI PALACE AT BOME, 

No. 

Durer, A 79 Christ among the Doctors, 

Claude GeMe (Lorraine) — Small Landscape, 

Guido Beni .... 85 Portrait of Beatrice Cenci, 

Baphael, attributed to . 82 The Fomarina. — A duplicate. 



Credi, Lorenzo di 



THE BOBGHESE PALACE AT BOME. 

Catalogues in the Rooms only. 

Examined in 1874-5. 

Room L 
No. 

2 TLoly Famil'i). 



HOME: THE B0BGHE8E, 285 

No. 
Peragino, Pietro ... 34 Madxmna and Child. 
)« » . . . 48 iS^. Sebastian. 

Boom II, 

Garofalo 9 The Deposition, 

ftaphael ..... 38 The Entombment 

Francia 43 Madonna and Child. 

„ 51 St. Stephen. 

Boom III, 



Andrea del Sarto, attri- 
buted to .... 28 Madonna and Saints, 

Correggio 40 The Banae, 

Sebastiano del Piombo . 48 A small replica of the large work in 

S. Pietro in Montorio — Christ at the 
Column, — A copy by a later painter : 
C. and C. 

Solario, Andrea ... 1 Christ bearing the Cross. 

Boom IV, 

Cagnacci, Guido ... 15 Sibyl, 
Domenichino 2 The Cumean Sibyl. 

Boom V. 

Albani 11-14. The Four Seasons. 

Carayaggio .... 26 Hciy Family, 
Domenichino .... 15 The Chase of Diana. 

Boom VI, 
Sasaoferrato .... 18 Madonna, 

Boom VII, 

Contains decorative work by Mario dei Fieri, died 1673, and 

nothing eUe. 



28& 



ROME: THE CAPITOL MUSEUM, 



Baphael<t School of 



»» 



»> 



« • 



Titian 



»♦ 



»♦ 



atlributed to . 



^ordenone, attributed to . 



Bonifazio 



>» 



Lotto, Lorenzo . 
Pordenone, B. Licinio da 



Diirer, Albrecht 
Van Dyck 



jRoom IX. 
No. 
1, 2. Marriage of Alexander and Bcmana, 
3 Group of Archers. — Said to be designed 
by Michael Angelo. Fresooes traD»> 
ferred from the Villa Borghese. 

Boom X. 

21 Sabered and Profane Lovo* — Or better, 
* Sated and Artless Loye,' acooiding 
to 0. and C. 
30 Virgin ar^ Child. — ^A late work. 
2 The Three Ages.— A. copy which maff be 
either by Giorgione or Sassofiena;^ : 
C. and 0. 
9 A Portrait — Is by LoreiiEa Lotfa^ 

Boom XL 

15 CJirist in the House of Z^bedee. 

16 Betum of the Prodigal, 

1 Madonna with a Saint and a Bishop. 
33 Portrait of an Artist and his Famibf. — 
Counterpart of the picture at Hamp- 
ton Court, No. 152, attributed to h. 
A. Pordenone, but really by Job 
brother. 

Boom XIL 

37 Portrait. 
7 An Entonibment. 



THE GALLERY OF THE CAPITOL AT BOME. 

No Catalogue. 

Examined 1874-5. 
No. 



Bellini, Geptile, atlfi- 
buted to , , . , 



— Profile Head. — ^In tempera. 



ROME: COLONNA AND C0R8INL 



287 



Oaravaggio (Amerighi) 
Garofalo (Tiaio) 
Guercino . 



»» 



Bubens, P. P. . 
Van Dyck 

Yelasquez 



No. 

— Tke Fortune-teller, 

— Several small paintings. 

— The SihyVa Persica. 

— Santa Petronilla. 

— Finding of RomtUus and Ttemui* 

— Portraits of Thomas Ktlligrew and 

Henry Carew. — In one frame. 

— His own Portrait 



THE COLONNA PALACE AT BOME. 
Pictures examined 1874. 

A large ooUeoition of inferior pictures. The best are as follows : 

No. 

— Madonna, &o. 



AlnnnOyNicoolb . . 
Ayanzi, Jaoopo da Bo> 

logna . . . 
Bonif^zio . . . 
Bordone, Paris 

Caracci, Annibale 
Lanftanco, Giovanni 
Palma Vecchio . 
Bosa, Salvator . 
Bubens, P. P. . 
Van Dyck . . 



— A Orucijixion, 

— A Madonna with Saints, 

— Holy Family with St, Sebastian and 

Saints, 

— TJie Greedy Eater. 

— The Liberation of St, Peter, 

— Madonna, St, Peter, and Donator, 

— Several examples. 

— Assumption of the Virgin, 

— Equestrian Portrait of a Duke of 

Cdlonna, 



THE COESINI PALACE AT BOME. 

Pictures examined 1874. 

No. 
Angelico, Fra ... — Descent of the Holy Ghoit. 



»» 



>» 



— Ascension, 



288 



BOME: THE DOBIA. 



Angelioo, Fra . . 
Bartolommeo, Fra 
Dolci, Carlo . . . 


No. 

— The Realms of ^e Ble$L 

— A Holy Family, 

— Eoee Homo, 


>♦ »» » . . 
GuidoBeni . . . 


— 8t. ApoUinaria. 

— Eeoe Homo. 


» ♦» . . . 
Maratta . . . 


— Daughter of Herodias. 

— Head, known as * La FifUara* 


Murillo . . . . 


— Madonna and Child, 



THE DORIA PALACE AT BOME. 
Ficturee examined 1874r-5. 

This is a gallery crowded with pictures of a third-rate quality, with 
a few good ones intermixed; but there is one small room — a mere 
cabinet — at the end of the Gallery of Mirrors, altogether overlooked 
as I have often observed by uninformed visitors, which contains some 
of the finest pictures, mainly portraits, in existence. 

In the Grallery will be found a good Pordenone, the ' Daughter of 
Herodias ;* and a ' Holy Family,* by his brother, B. L. Pordenone. 

A Paris Bordone, * Mercury, Venus, and Cupid.* 

A Garolalo. * The Visitation.' 

A cartoon by Correggio; and a 'St Jerome,* given to Caraeci, which 
is by Lorenzo Lotto. 

Numerous examples of Graspar Dughet, surnamed Poussin. 

By Claude Gelee, * The Temple of Apollo ' and * 11 Molino/ and one 
or two small ones. 

There are several landscapes h^re more or less belonging to the 
schools of Claude and Poussin : among them a fine one by Francesco 
Mola. 

The small cabinet referred to above : 

No. 
Memling, School of . . — A Deposition, — Given to the master 

himself by C. and 0. 
Quintin Matsys, School 

of — The Two Misers, 

Baphael — Two Fortraits in one frame. 



MOME: THE PALACES. 289 

No. 
Sebastlano del Piombo . — Portrait of A, Doria, 
Velasquez, Diego . . — Portrait of Innocent X 
And two or three others. 



THE FARNESE PALACE AT ROME. 

The famous frescoes by Annibale Garacd and his School. 



THE VILLA FARNE8INA AT ROME. 

Entrance HaU contains frescoes painted by the scholars of Raphael 
under the direction of the master. 

Hall of the Galatea. — The frescoes on the walls are almost entirely 
from the hand of Raphael. The lunettes by Sebastiano del Piombo. 
Other decorations by Peruzzl. 

Upper HaUs. — The second is chiefly worth seeing for two frescoes 
by Bazzi (H Sodoma), * Alexander and Roxana ' and the ' Family of 
Darius before Alexander.' 



THE VILLA LtJDOVISI AT ROME. 

In the Casino, on the ground-floor, a famous fresco by Guercino, 
' Aurora driving away Night.* 

In a saloon to the left small paintings on the ceiling by Guercino 
and Domenichino. 

In an upper saloon a fresco on the ceiling by Guercino, 'Fame 
with Force and Virtue.' 



THE ROYAL PALACE OF THE QUIRINAL AT ROME. 

The following pictures, among many others, are those most worthy 

to be noted : 

Ko. 

Bartolommeo, Fra . . — St. Peter a/nd St. PaviL 

Lotto, Lorenzo . — Madonna a/nd Saints. 



290 



BOME: THE PALACES. 



Melozzo da Forli 



• • 



Piombo, Sebastiano del . 
Pordenone, G. A. . . 
Beni, Guido .... 



No. 

— Chrigt surrounded hy AngeU. — On the 

staircase. 

— Sead of 8t. Bernard. 

— 8L George and the Dragon, — ^Life-size. 

— Madonna and Infant, — ^In the private 

chapel. 



THE ROSPIGLIOSI PALACE AT ROME. 

In the Casino in the garden, on the roof of the middle hall, is the 
&mons fresco of the * Aurora attended by the Hours ' by Guido Beni. 

In the ball to the right : 

No. 
Domenichino .... — Adam and Eve in Baradise. 

In the hall to the left : 
Domenichino .... — The Triumph of David, 



THE SCIABRA PALACE AT ROME. 

Bicfturee examined 1875. 
The finest works are all in the fourth or end room. 

No. 



Bartolommeo, Fra, and 

Mariotto . 
Bril, Paul . . . 
Caravaggio . . . 
Claude (Jel^e (Lorraine) 
Cranaoh, Lucas . . 
Goes, Hugo van der . 
Perugino .... 
Raphael .... 
Buam, Elisabetta . 



— Madonna^ ChUd, ar^d 8t, John, 

— Two Landscapes, 

— The Card-players. 

— Ttoo small Landscapes. 

— Holy Family. 

— Death of the Virgin. 

— 8t, Sebastian, 

— The Violin^player. 

— A Carita, — ^After the manner of Guido 



i 



ROME: THE VATICAN. 291 

No. 
Titian, attributed to . — A BeUa di Tiziano, — Giyen hy 0. and 

0. to Palma Yecchio. 
Yinoi, Leonardo da, at- 
tributed to ... . -^ Modesty and Vanity, 



THE SPADA PALACE AT ROME, 

No. 
Guercino .'.... 48, Room III. The Death of Dido, 
Beni, Guido .... 20, Room IIL The Rape of Helen, 



THE VATICAN COLLECTION AT ROME. 

No Catalogue. 

Pictwres examined 1874-5. 
No. 

Alunno, Niccolb ... — AUar-pieoe in fourteen parts. 
Angelico, Fra ... 6 St Nicholas of Bari, 

Baroooi 85 The Annunciation, 

„ ^ The Ecstasy of 8, Miehelina, 

Caravaggio, Michael 

Angelo da ... . 30 The Entombment, 

Gesare da Sesto ... 40 Madonna and Saints, 

Crivelli, Carlo . . . 11 J. Pieth. — A lunette. 

Domenichino .... 17 The Last Communion of St, Jerome, 

Guerdno 12 The Incredulity of St. Thomas, 

Guido dS The Cruoifixim of St, Peter, 

Ijiantegna, Andrea, at-^ 5 A Pieta. — Assigned to Giovanni Bellin 

tributed to . . j by 0. and C. 

Melozzo da Forli . . 31 Audience of Sixtus TV, — ^A fresco. 

Moretto (Bonvicino). . — Virgin and CJiHd Enthroned, * 

„ „ . . — Virgin and Child with Saints, 

Murillo 15 The Marriage of St, Catharine. 

Perugino 2 St. Benedict and oither Saints, 

„ ..... 24 The Beswreeiion,* 

28 Madonna and Child vnth 8a\tv<A* 



w 



* his supposed the hand of BaphMflL may be Meioi Vii\M^>^«Hb'^<s£^Ba^ 



292 



BOME: THE VATICAN. 



Pemgino, School of . . 



Pintnricchio . 
Poussin, Nicolas . 
Baphael Sanzio . 



»♦ 
>» 
»♦ 
» 



»» 
» 



Romano, Ginlio, and 
Francesco Penni . . 
Sacchi, Andrea . 
Sassoferrato . . . . 
Spagna, Lo, attributed to . 



Spagnoletto . 
Titian . . . 



»> 



Valentin, Moise . 
Vinci, Leonardo da . 



No. 

26 A Nativity — Madonna detta SpUieta,'^ 

Attributed in the catalogue to the 
joint authorship of Pemgino, Pin- 
tnricchio, and BaphaeL Giyen to Lo 
Spagna by G. and 0. 

23 (joronaiion of the Virgin, 

34 Martyrdom of 8t. Erasmus. 

27 TJie Coronation of the Virgin, — Very 

early, or only partially his. 
4 The PredeUa. 

18 The Madonna da Fdigno. 

19 The Transfiguration. 

8 A PredeUa — Faith, Hope, and Charity^ 
— Belonging to the EntonibmerU at 
the Borghese Palace. 

— The Madonna di Monte Luce, 
36 8. Momualdo and his Brethren. 
29 Madonna and Child with Angels. 

86 The Adoration. — A work of the time 
and school of Baphael of which the 
authorship is doubtful. 

— The Martyrdom of St. Laurence. 

20 The Virgin and Child with St, Sdxistian 

and other Saints. 

21 Portrait of a Doge of Venice. 
32 Martyrdom of two Saints. 

1 St Jerome. 



*^* It seems necessary to say that in this gallery the picture attri- 
buted to Correggio is by a later and inferior hand. 

9 The LoaGiE are decorated by pupils of Baphael after designs of the 
master. 

Three of the Stanze were painted by Baphael, and one chiefly by 
Giulio Bomano, after the death of the master. 

J. — Stanza of the Incendio dd Borgo. 

No. 
Bnpbael — TKe Incendio de\ Bwgo. 



HOME: THE VATICAN. 293 

No. 

Baphael — Juatificatian of Leo IIL before Charle-^ 

magne, 

„ — The Coronation of Charlemagne by Leo 

IIL 
9, — The Victory of Leo IV. 

IL — Stanza della Segnatura, 

Kaphael ■ — Theology, or the Disputa del Sacra- 

memlo. 

„ — Poetry, or Mount Parnassus. 

„ — Philosophy, or the School of Athens, 

„ — Jurisprudence. 

III.— Stanza of Hdiodorus. 

Kaphael — The Expulsion' of Hdiodorus from the 

, Temple. 

„ — The Mirade of'Bolsena. 

„ — Leo I. ^eventing Attila*8 entrance to 

Borne. 
„ — The Ddiverance of St. Peter. 

TV, — Sola of Constantine. 

Giulio Bomano ... — Victory of Constantine at the Milvian 

Bridge. 
„ „ ... — The Cross appearing to Constantine. 

Francesco Penni ... — The Baptism of Constantine. 
Haphael del CoUe . . — Conaitantine presenting Borne to the Pope. 

In the SiSTiNE Chapel are the celebrated frescoes by Michael 
Angelo. 

The roof is occupied with numerous subjects, firom the *■ Creation of 
the World ' to the * Deluge.' 

At the four comers are the following incidents from Jewish history : 
(I) 'The Brazen Serpent;' (2) * Punishment of Haman;' (3) * David 
and Goliath ;' (4) * Judith and Holofernes.' 

Besides these there are twelTe seated ^gvut^a <^l NXy^^^&'^^^s^ ^s^ 



291 



SISNA. 



Sibyls in compartments abound ; and subjects from the history of the 
Virgin occupy the arches ahoye the windows. 

Lastly, the end wall exhibits the final work of Hie great series— 
namely, the fresco of the ' lAst Judgment.' 

On the side walls are frescoes by Sandro Bottioelli> Domenico Ghir*> 
landajo^ Ck)simo Bosselli^ Pietro PeruginO) and Luca Signorelli* 



I'HE GALLEBY OP FINE ARTS AT SIENA. 

Catalogue of 1872. 
Boom of Differeni Schools. 



Amberget, Christopher . 
Beccafiumi .... 



»» 



Schongauer, Martin > 



No. 

54 Portrait of Emperor Charies F. 

63-66. St, Catharine of Siena reeeitnng ihe 

Stigmata, 
119-116. Original cartoons for the marble 

pavement of the Cdthedral of Siena. 
53 Sis own Porirait. 



j&oom of ^ Sienese School. 



Bazzi, or Bazd (H So- 
doma) . . . k . 



» 



»» 



Ducdo di Bnoninsegna . 
Lorenzetti, Aml»ogio . 






Pietro 



» 



Matteo di Giovanni . 






n 



Memmi^ lippo, attri*- 
buted to k . . . 

SaoodiPieiro . . 



205 Christ at the Column. 
841 In Limbo, — ^f^sco. 
377 Descent from the Cross.— 'OiL 
28 Madotma and ChUd with Saints^ 

45 the Annunciaii&n. 

46 An AUar-piece. 

55 Virgin and ChUd Enthroned. 

56, 57. PredeUas. 

58 Virgin and Child with Angels. 

166 Virgin and ChUd Enthroned. 

167 Virgin and OkOd Enthroned. 

168 Virgin and Child with SL Catharine. 

90 Virgin and Child with Saints. 
145 AUar-piiece iu ihflTM QiQm<;^atrUm«^ 



SJOSNA. 



295 



Sano di Pleiaro 



)> 



5J 



» 



n 



»> 



» 



SignoreUi, Luoa 
Spinello Aretino 
Taddeo di Bartolo 



No. 

152 AUar-piece in three compartmenU. 
187 JUcur-pieoe in three eompariments, 
239 Virgin and Child toith Saints, 
294 Virgin and ChUd toith Saints^ 
219,220. Siege of Troy, 
236 Coronation of the Virgin, 
125 Annunciation of the Virgin. 



THE PALAZZO PUBBLICO AT SIENA. 



Bazzi, or Sodoma. 



Beooafami 



SpineUo Aretino . . 



Stanza del Gonfaloniere, 

No. 

— Freeeo of the Beeurrection, 

Sola del Coneisloro, 

— Freecoes, 

Saia di Balia. 

— Freeoo of the Preeession of Emperor 

Frederick Barharossa and Pope Alex- 
ander III, 



Sala del CmmgUo, 

Bazzi, or Sodoma. . . — Fresco of three Sainte and Chervbe, 

Simone Martini ... — Fresco of Madonna and Saints. 

Ambrogio Lorenzetti,'^ — Tioo Baitte-pieo6s,-^la brown mono- 
attributed to • . / chrome. 



Ambrogio Lorenzetti 



Sola deUa Pa4ie. 

— Frescoes r^presenHng the Advantages of 
Justice and Peaoe^ and the Effects of 
Chod and Bad Judgment, 



296 



TURIN. 



THE PINACOTECA AT jmLm. 
Catalogue of 1875/ 



Albani, FranceBOO . 
Bazzi (n Sodoma) . . 



♦» 



»» 



Bellotti, Bernardo . . 

♦» »> • • 

Botticelli, Sandro . . 



»> 



»» 



Brueghel, Jan (Velours) 
Ganale, Antonio . 
Gredi, Loren^ di . . 
Dyck, Anton van 



»♦ 



»» 



» 



»» 



Francia, Francesco . 
Fyt, Jan .... 



Heem, Jan David de 

♦» » 

Holbein, Hans . 

Livens, or Lievens 
Macrino d'Alba . 
Memling, EEans . 
Mieris, Frans van 
Potter, Paul . . 
Kapliael . . . 
Saveldo, Girolamo 
Sesto, Oesare da . 
Teniers, D., younger 
Velasquez . . 
Veronese, P. (Caliari) 



»♦ 



» 



Werff, Adrian van der . 
Wbuwerm&n, Fhilig , . 



No. 

260, 264, 271, 274. The Four Elements. 
50 Holy FamUy, ' 

376 Lttcrezia, 

283 View of Turin. 
288 View of Turin. 
98 Tobit and the AngeL 
369 Allegorical Painting. 
380 Marine Piece. 
257 bis. View in Venice. 
103 Virgin and Child. 
338 The Three Children of Charles I. 

363 Equestrian Portrait of Prince Thomas 

of Savoy 

384 Bdy Family. 

101 APieth. 

225 FruU. . . 

231 bis. Animals and Fruit. 

228 Flowers and Fruit. 

365 Flowers and Fruit. 
386 Portrait of Erasmus. 

377 bis. An Interior. 

50 bis. Virgin and Child with Saints, 
358 The Seven Sorrows of the Virgin. 
379 His own Portrait. 
^TJ Cattle in a Landscape. 
373 Madonna delta Tenda. 
119 Virgin KneeUng and Child. 

71 Madonna. 

364 Interior of an Inn. 
892 Bust of Philip IV. 
157 Ov'Sen of Sheba. 

234 Christ at the Feast of Simon. 
396 Small composition. 

366 A BattU. 



UBBINO AND VENICE, 



297 



THE MUSEUM AT UBBINO. 



Gioyanni Santi (the 

father of Baphael) 
Justus of Ghent . . 
Timoteo Viti . . . 



No. 

— Madonna^ SaintSy and Domtors, 

— A Last Supper, 

— Saints. 



THE ACADEMY OF FINE ABTS AT VENICE. 

Catalogue op 1871. 



Antonello da Messina 
Basaiti, Marco . 



>» 



»> 



» 



» 



Bellini, Jaoopo 
Gentile 



5> 



>» 



>5 



>» 



5» 



>» 



»> 



99 



99 



»5 



»> • 

» • 

Giovanni 

>» 
>» 



» 



»> 



» 



f> 



Benedetto, Diana 

Bissolo, F. . . 
Bonifazio Yeneziano 



»» 



»> 



ff 



99 



» 



W 



No. 
. 264 Christ ai the Column, 
. 31 Calling of the Sons of Zebedee. 
. 317 St, Jerome, 
. 534 The Agony in the Garden, 
. 443 Madonna and ChUd, — ^Early work and 

injured. 
. 529 Miracle of the True Cross, 
, 543 The Shrine, — ^Much injured. 
. 555 Procession in the Piazza of 8, Maroo, 
. 38 Virgin, and Child with six Saints, 
. 94 Madonna and Child, 
. 3ia Madonna and Child ''of the AdmiraUy 

Magistrate,** 
, 234-238. Allegories, 
. 372 Virgin adoring the Child. — ^Tempera. 
. 424 Madonna and SS, Paul and George, 
. 436 Madonna and Child with tioo Saints, 
• 580 Virgin aawl Child enthroned with 

Saints. 
, ,541 The Coronation of St. Caiharine, 
. 57 The AdoraJUon of the Magi, 
, 483 Virgin in Glory and Saints. 
, 500 The Bich Man, 
, 505 Th^ Saviour EiitlironnAdi^ 



298 



VENICE. 



BonifjEtzio Yeneziano. . 
Bordone, Paris . • . 



n 



» 



Buonconfliglii, Giov. 
Carpaccio, Y. 



» 



y» 



Catena, Y. . . . 

n ... 

Gima da Gonegliaao .. 









Grarofalo (Tiflio) . . 
Gentile da Fabriane . 
Giordano, Luca . . 
Holbein, Hans .' . 
Jaoobello del Fiore . 
Mansuetl .... 



n 



Manteg;na, A. « . . 
Hartino da Udine . . 
Marziale, Maroo . . . 
Matteo da Bologna . . 
Montagna, Bartolommeo 
Moretto (Bonvicino) . . 

Huzano, Giovanni and 
Antonio da . . . 
„ .... 

Padovanino (Yarottari) . 






9> 



Palma Yeochio ^ 



No. 

586 88. Benedetto and 8^ba8tian. 

428 The TibuHine Sibyl 

492 Fisherman presenting ihe Bing to the 

Doge of Venice. 
272, 601, 602. Fortume of large warke. 
488 The Presentation in the Temple. 
537, 542. 544, 546, 549, 552, 554, 55», 560. 
Scenes from the History of 8t, Uinnla. 
564 Casting out <i DeviL — ^Retouched. 
13 St, Jerome. 
385 Virgin and ^ChUdvnthSainii. 
421 Madonna and Child. 

429 AJ^ieta. 

456 The Saviouf^ St. Thomas, and <Mna(her 

Saint. 
582 Virgin and CShUd Enthroned. 
452 Virgin and Saints. 
382 Virgin and Child. 
571 The Descent from the Cross. 

266 Portrait of a Young Woman. 

22 Madonna and two Saints. 

540 St. Mark preaching at Jlexandriin, 
548 Miracle of the Crou. 
273 St, Oeorge. 
532 The Angel Oabfid. 
96 The Supper at Emmaus. 
2 AUar-pieoe. 
361 Virgin enthroned witih two StUiits. 
261 iS^. Peter. 

267 St. J<^n the Bt^Ost. 

23 Virgin and -the Four Doctors. 
8 -Coronation of the Virgin. 

47 Marriage -ai Cana. 

85 The Figure of Vanity. 
134 The Bape of Proserpine. 
139 Judith. 
WQ St. Peter enthroned idth ixther iSSsinte.— 



VENICE. 



299 



No. 
Palma Yecohio . » . 84 Chritt kedU tke Dcmghter of the Canaan^ 

itish Woman, 
„ „ . V . 49 The Assumption, 

Fordenone . . ^ . 486 Virgin und SainU, 

„ • • • • 490 Four Saints,— OiheiB attributed to him 

here are by other painters; C and G, 
Savoldo^ Girdamo . , 2SS 8t, Peter and 8t P<iul. 
Semitecolo, Nioolas . . 894 Coronation of the Virgin, 
Tintoretto (J. Bobusti) . 86 The Besarreotion and three Senators. 
„ n . 45 2%e MiracHe of St, Mark. 

Titian 2i The Assumption of the Virgin. 

„,..... 88 2%d EntamJlment.—ChiGQ^ Titian, but 

finished by Pahna Gtovace, being 
Titian's last work, 
^ ...... 85 Z%6 Visitation. 

....... 866 St. John in the Desert. 

„ 487 The Presentation in the Temple. 

Veronese, Paolo*. . . 519 Virgin and CbtTd and Saints. 

f, „ • • • 547 The Repast at Levies House. 

Yioentino^ Andrea . . S% The EtemaZ Father and SaUUs, 
Yivarini, Bartolommeo . 1 Virgin and four Saints. 
Yiyarini, Giovanni and 

Antonio .... 581 The Angel Oabrid. 
„ .... 583 The Virgin Annunciate. 

Yiyarisi, Lnigi , . . 561 Virgin amd Saints, 



or 



THE DUCAL PALACE AT YENICB. 

On the first floor is the Great Hall of ConncU. Its walls are covered 
with paintings, among which are the celebrated ' Paradise^by Tintoretto ; 
others are by the sons of Paul Yeronese; "ky L. and F. Bassano, Palma 
the elder and younger, Domenico, Tintoretto and others. The frieze 
is adorned by portraits of ihe ' Boges,' chiefly by Tintoretto. 

The paintings on the ceiUng are by P. Yeronese, Tintoretto, the 
younger Palma, and the two Bassanos. 

* Tbero are also in a room alone twelve works by Veronese, illnskiating the histoci 
at St. Sebastian, teaqporarily removed 4o4he AcaAemy ^he\&%^« <»V^ti^ caaBiSs»^^sGL\a 
tbe Cbuidi of San Sebastiaae (1873^ 



300 VENICE AND VEBONA, 

The Hall of Scmtiny, on the same floor oontunti, among many 
others, wall-paintings by Tintoretto, Yicentino, Bellotti, F. BasBBiio^ 
and Falma the younger. 

In the Library is the famous 'Grimani Breviary,' illustrated by 
Memling and other early masters. 

On the second floor are several apartments. The^Hall of the Four 
Doors has frescoes on the ceiling by Tintoretto. On one of the walls, 
among other works, is the famous picture of the 'Doge Giimani 
Kneeling before Faith,* by Titian, much restored, but still fine. 

In the Hall of the Senate are decorative paintings on the ceiling and 
walls by Tintoretto, the younger Palma and others. 

In the ante-chamber leading to the cbapel are works by Bonifieudo 
and Tintoretto. On the staircase leading to the Doge's chapel is a * St. 
Christopher and Christ' by Titian. In the Anti-Oollegio are fine 
examples of Tintoretto, Veronese, and others. By the same artists are 
works in the Sala del Collegio. 



THE SCUOLA DI SAN ROCCO AT VENICE. 

This building contains a large collection of Tintoretto's works, which 
occupy the lower hall, the staircase, and the apartments upstairs; 
almost all great compositions &om the history of Our Lord. 

A large ' Annunciation ' by Titian hangs rather high on the stair- 
case. Many of these works are not easily seen, from want of light. 



THE PINACOTEOA AT VEBONA. 
Old Collection. 

No. 
Bonsignori, Francesco . 29 A Crucifixion, 

Caroto 30 SL Francis and hatnts, 

„ SS St. Caiharine, 

„ 88 Madonna and Saints, 

Cavazzola 101-109. A Deposition and two side wings 

with Saints and Donaiors, — Other 
examples also. 
Crivelli, Carlo ... 43 Virgin and Child wiih Angels, — ^Early 



VICENZA. 301 



Ltibri, Girolamo dai . . 276 Madonna with two Saints. 

„ „ . . 278 Madonna under a Laurel- tree. 

Morone, Francesco . . 87, 89. Tvjo wings of an altar-piece — St. 

Bartholomew and St. Francis. 



The CoLLEonoN of Dr. Bebnascoki contaips few works of merit, and 
the names attached to the paintings are not to be accepted. The 
following examples are to be observed : 

No. 
Bbnsignori, Francesco . — A Virgin. 

Caroto 47 Holy Family. 

„ 297 Christ washing His Disciples' Feet, 



THE MUSEUM AT VICENZA. 

No. : 

Bassano, Leandro . . — Madonna and Sojints presenting Magis- 
trates of the City. 

Oima da Gonegliano . . — Madonna and Child under Vines. — In 

tempera. 

Montagna, Bartolommeo — Madonna and Saints. 

— Presentation in the Temple. 

— Virgin enthroned with Saints. 



>» >» 



«* Other examples of Montagna to be found in several churches. 



802 



ANTWEBP: THE MUSEUM. 



THE PICTUKE GALLEEIES OF BELGIUM. 



THE MUSEUM AT ANTWERP. 



Antonello da Messina . 
Both, Jan and Andries . 
Boats, Dierick . 



>» 



M 



Ooxcyen, M, van . 
Oranach, Lucas . 
Dyck, Anton van 



n 



>♦ 



» 



99 



Eyck, Jan yan 



99 
» 






Fyt, Jan 



>♦ 



» 



Hals, Erans .... 
Holbein, Hans, yonnger . 
Huysum, Jan van . . 
Jordaens, Jacob . . 
Mabuse, Jan (Gossaert) . 
r Martini, Simone . . . 

Matsys, Quintin . . . 
Mending, Hans . . . 



ff 



» 



OrJe^, Bernard ran . 



Gatalogxte of 1875. 

No. 

4 A Crucifixion. 
26 View in Italy. 

28 The Virgin. 

29 8L Christopher. 
371 Martyrdom of 8t. Sebastian. 

42 Adam and Eve. 

403 Christ taken dotonfrom the Cross, 

404 The Entonibment, 

405 Portrait. 

410 St. Barbara. 

411 The Virgin. 

412 Virgin^ St. George, and St. DonaHts. — 
Beplica or copy of the picture in the 
Bruges Academy. 

171 Eagles Feeding. 

172 Two Greyhounds. 
188 J Fisher-boy. 
198 Portrait of Erasmus. 
427 Bouquet of Flowers. 
215-222. Several examples. 
180 The Just Judges. 
257-260. Four Panels— Annunciatimy Crud- 

fixion, Deposition, The Virgin. 
245-249. Triptych— Entombment of Christ. 
254 Portrait. 
255,256. A Diptych. 
461, 462. Portraits. 



BEUQE8. 



803 



Orley, Bernard Tan . . 
Ostade, Adrian yan . . 
Bembrandt van Byn . . 
„ attributed to 
Bubens, P. P. 



>» 
n 



Seghers, Daniel 
Snyders, Frans 
Steen, Jan 

»» » • 
Terbnrg, G. . 

Tiziano . . 



Yos, Martin de, the elder 
„ Ck)meli8 . . . 



n 



y» 



Weenix, J. B. . . 
Weyden, B. yan der 



w 



n 



No. 

464 Adoroition of ihe Magi, 

466 The Smoker, 

293 Woman*8 Portrait 

294, 295. Por^raife.— SmalL 

297 Christ between the two Thieves. 

298 Adoration of the Magi. 

300 Trtpiyc^.— Centre, Dead Christ, 
305 Last Communion of 8t, Francis, 
307 Triptych^Incredulity of St. Thomas, 
313 The Crucifixion, 
331 Oarland of Flowers, 
335 Swans and Dogs. 

338 Samson insulted by the Philistines. 

339 The ViUage Wedding, 
349 The Mandolin-player. 

357 Pope Alexander VI. presenting the 

Bishop of Paphos to St. Peter, 
— NumeronB works, but not good. 
104 Portrait of Abraham Grapheus. 
107 St Norbet receiving the Host 
497 View of a Sea-port in Italy. 
393-395. Triptych— The Seven Saerwneats,^ 
397 Portrait ofPhUip the Good, 



THE ACADEMY AT BBTJGES. 

Catalogtte of 1875. 

It contains a fine specimen or two of Jan van Eyok and of MemUng, 
bnt no other works worthy of notice. 



Eyck, Jan yan 



r» 



•Memling, Hans . 



No. 

1 Virgin and Child with two Saints and 

the Donator. 

2 Portrait of his Wife. 

4 A Triptych. — Centre, St Christopher 
and Infant Christ vrUh two Saints, 
% On the wings, Donator and his S(msy 
and Donotrice and DaM^VJUrt%^Mapfi(^ 
Potroi^Saiwtt. 



304 BRUGES AND SBUS8EL8. 

No. 

Pourbufl, Peter ... 17 The Last Judgment, 

n ,9 ... 18 The Deposition, — A triptych. 



» » 



THE MUSEUM IN THE HOSPITAL OF ST. JOHN AT 

BRUGES. 

Gataloqxte of 1869. 

No. 
Memling, Hans ... 1 The Marriage o St, Cat^rMie.— A 

triptych. 

2 The Chdssej or Reliquary of SL Ursula, 
— A chest, consisting of three panels 
on each side, painted with aoenee 
from the life of the saint. There is 
a panel at each end, one is painted 
with a figure of St. Ursula, the other 
with a figure of the Virgin. The 
chdsse has a slanting roof adorned 
by eix medallions. 

3 The Adoration of the Magi. 

4 The Virgin and ChUd and the Donator, 
— ^A diptych. 

5 The Sibyl Sambetha. 

6 A Descent from the Cross, 
Van Oost, Jacques, elder 11 A Philosopher in Meditation. 

12 Descent from the Cross, — ^And others. 



n »♦ 

^* »> 

»♦ » 



5» »> » 



» 



„ younger — Several examples. 



MUSEE NATIONAL AT BRUSSELS. 
Gatalogttb of 1875. 

No. 
Aertsen, Fieter • . . 409 The Cook, 
Albam, P. • ^ . . 99 Adam and Eve— the FaXl, 
Alsloot, Van 802, 308. Proce%«MH«. 



BEUS8ELS: THE MUSEUM. 



805 



Amberger, C. 
Arthois, J. d' 
Berchem, N. 
Bol, F. . 



»> 



>» 



»> 



Botli, J. and A. 
Brueghel, J. (Velours) 
Brueghel, P., elder 
Brueghel, P., younger 
Bruyn, Bart. . 



» 



99 



Champaigne, P. de 



w 



Claude G^^e (Lorrai 
Coello, A. 8. . 



»> 



» 



Oonixloo, C. van 
Goxie, Michael 



99 



»» 



Cranach, L. 
Grayer, G. de 



99 



99 



>» 



Cuyp, A. . 
Dossi, Dosso 
Dow, G. . 
Dughet, Caspar 
Dutch School . 
Dyck, A. van 



»» 



>» 



»> 



99 



ne 



Eyck, H. and J. van 



ff 



Jan van . 



No. 

362 Portrait of a Man, 
100-104. Landscapes. 
410 Landscape and Cows. 

119 Male Portrait. 

120 Female Portrait. 

121 Woman's Portrait. 

122 Philosopher in Meditation. 
124 Landscape. 

129 8t. Norhert Preaching. 

2 Mas8a.ere of the Innocents. 

3 Fall of the Bebel Angels. 

4 Male Portrait. 

5 Female Portrait. 
140, 141. Saints. 

142-151. Legend of St. Benoit. 
199 Landscape. 

157 Female Portrait. 

158 Fem(de Portrait. 

159 Female Portrait. 

367 The Parentage of the Virgin. 

163 Altar-piece. 

164 Death of the Virgin. 
364 Portrait of an Old Man. 
365, 366. Adam and Eve. 

167 The Miraculous Draught. 

168 Martyrdom of a Saint. 

169 Assumption of St. Catharine. 
170, 171. Saints.-^Aad othera 
180 Om? tn Stable with Fowls. 

185 Christ in the House of Simon. 

186 Interior by CamUdight. 

187 Landscape. 
458, 459. Portraits. 

188 Crucifixion of Peter. 

189 >1 /^o^yr. 

192 Portrait of Alexander de la Faille. 

13 >l{2am and Eve. — Two panels originally 

forming part of tVv& ^c^»X AA«tQ.\\i«ts. 
of tlie Lamb m ^\..'B«^wi ^\.Q?w8c^. 

14 Adoratwn oj the lla^. 



806 



BRUSSELS: THE MUSEUM. 





No. 


Flemish School . , 


. 42 Virgin and Cfttld.— This may be bj 




Petrus Ghristus aoc(»rdmg to G. and 


» Vt • ' 


51 Hmid of a Man. 


>» >» • • 


. 370 Chrigt and Moumers.-^A Triptych. 


>» » 


. . 378,879,384. A Tnptyoh, 


yt »> • • 


. . 382 FeoMk PoHraiL 


Flinok, Govert . . 


. 414 Female Portrait, 


Florifl, Frans . . . 


. 196 Last Judgment— A Triptych. 


German School . . 


. 84 The Crucifixion, 


n- vt • ' 


85 Scourging of Christ and the Asnengion.- 




These panels bear much resemblanoei 




the Lyyersberg ^ Passion ' at Gologm 


>» n • ' 


. . 408 Virgin environed viUh Sairds, 


»» »> 


, . 404,405. Life-size Figures tf Saint8. 


^y >» • « 


. . 406 ChrigtandtheApeetles.— A Piedel]&. 


Gaercino . . . . 


. 112 Virgin, Child, and Patron-Saints, 


Gyselfl, P. . . . 


. 202 Dead Game, 


Hals, Frans . . . 


, 415 Male PoHrait, 


♦> ♦♦ • • 


. . 416 Cavalier iSaaied.— Small. 


Heem, X de . . . 


. 208 .FVuit.— Seyeral others. 


„ C. de . . . 


. 418 Study of Fruit 


Heist, B. van der 


, 205 MaU PertraU. 


>» " 


. . 206 Female PoHrait 


Hobbema, M. . 


419 Landseape, 


Holbein, Hans . . 


, , 19 Portrait of Sir T, More. 


Hondeooeter, M. . 


, , 420 Peacock and Potdtry, 


» • 


. . 421 Cook Crowing. 


Hugfeenburg, J. van 


, . 207 Battle-pieee. 


>» »» 


. . 422 BattU-piece. 


Hnysmans, G. 


. / 208 Laridscape. 


,,. J. S. . 


, . 209 Landscape. 


Jozdaens, Jacob . 


., 216 The Miracle of St MaHin. 


»j »» 


, . 217 An Allegory. 


>» >♦ • 


. . 218 A Satyr.— And others. 


Keyser, Th. de 


. . 424,425. Female PoHraiU. 


Lombard, Lambert 


. . 20 Last Supper. 


Maas, N. • . • 


. . 282 ul Woman Beading. 


Mabuse, J. (Gossaerl 


i) . 15 Jesus at the Rouse of Simon. — Tnptyol 


Maratta, 0. • . 


. . 234 M^jihologicaX BMbJect. 


Meen;,P. . . 


. . 237 Portrait Grouip. 



BRUSSELS: THE MUSEUM, 



807 





Na 


Memling, Hans . 


. . 21 Portrait of Wilhelm Moreel 


>» « • 


. . 22 PortraU of his Wife. 


>» »» 


attri- 


buted to . . 


. . 23 Male Portrait. 


Metsu, G. . . . 


.. 239 The CoOatum. 


Meulen, A. van der . . 24:0 The Army of Louis XI V,hef ore Tournai. 


Miens, W. van , 


. . 243 Susannah and the Elders. 


Mostaert, Jan 


. . 24 ^ IH'ptych. 


Mnrillo . . . 


, . 251 Franciscan Monk. 


Neefs, P. . . . 


. . 253 Interior of Antwerp Cathedral. 


Neer, Art. van de 


r . .234 Moonlight. 


j> »> 


. . — Skating Scene. — Unnumbered. 


Nieolant, Adrian 


van . 256 Oamival at Antwerp, 


Orley, B. van 


. . 25 Dead Christ.— A Triptych. 


i» » • 


. . 27 Portrait of George de ZeUe. 


»» i» • 


. . 368 AUar-piece in five Panels, 


Ostade, Adrian van . . 259 Peasant eating Herrings. 


„ Isaac van 


. . 260 Travellers Besting, 


»» »» 


. . '433 Genre Scene. 


Palamedes . . 


. . 261 Male Portrait 


Pannini . . . 


. . 263 Architectural Buins. 


Perugino . . 


. . 334 Virgin and Child with St. John. 


Pourbus, F., yonn 


ger . 268 Male Portrait, 


„ y, . 269 St. Matthew and an Angel. 


Pynacker, Adam. 


. . 273 Landscape, 


Bavesteyn, Jan va 


in . . 275 Female Portrait. 


>» j> 


. . 276 Female PoHrait 


Rembrandt 


. . 277 Male PoHrait. 


Rubens, P. P. . 


, . . 285 Christ on the way to Calvary. 


»» ' 


. 287 Assumption of the Virgin. 


■ 


>f * 


, . . 288 APidd. 


■ 




, . . 290 Adoration of the Magi, 


■ 




. . . 292 Venus and Vulcan. 


' 




. . . 294 Male Portrait. 






. . . 295 Female Portrait. 


1 




. . i37 Male Portrait, 






. . 438 Female Portrait. — And others. 


BuysdaelyJ. . . 


. • . 296 Landscape^ wiih Fi^UTe» \y^ A. <xki*(Vi ^ 




Vdde. 






^^ 



808 BRUSSELS: THE MUSEUM, 

No. 

Byckaert, D. . : . . 298 Interior, 

Sallaert 300,301. Processions, 

Sohalken, G 306 CandleligM Effect. 

8choeD, Martin ... 29 Ecce Homo, 

Seghers and Quellinus . 274 Flowers and Figures. 

Sibereclits, Jan . . . 811 Farmyard. 

Smeyers 312, 813. Large works, and others. 

Snayers ..... 441-445. Battle-pieces. 

Snyders, F 314 Swan, Deer^ and Peacock, and Fruit. 

Steen, J. .... . 318 The Bhetoridans. 

„ S19 The Operator. 

„ S20 The Feast of Kings. 

„ ...... 447 Interior wWt Figures. 

Steenwyck, H. van . . 321 Church Interior. 

Stoop, Dierick . . . 323 Landscape loith Figures. 
Stuerbout, or Bouts, Dirk 30 Injustice of the Emperor Otho. 

„ „ „ 31 Justice of the Emperor Otho. 

Teniers, D., younger . . 324 The Five Senses. 

„ „ . . 325 Village Dodtor. 

. . 449 Flemish Kermess. 

. , 450 Interior of a Picture Gallery. 

. . — Hut and Landscape. — Unnumbered. 

Tilborg 381 Prooedsum. 

Tintoretto .... 281 Portrait. 

„ ..... 282 Portrait. 

Veronese, Paolo . . . 130 Decorative Panel. — ^Large. 

VoB, Cornelia de . . . 453 Portrait Group. 

„ Martin de . . . 341, 342. Portraits. 

Vouet, Simon. . . . 343 San Carlo Borromeo praying for the 

Sick. 

Weenix, Jan .... 454. Dead Game and Fruit. 
Weenix, J. B., attributed 

to 345 Dutch Lady at her Toilette. 

"Weyden, Bogier van der 33 Head of a Weeping Woman. 
„ „ attri- 
buted to .... 34-41. Scenes from the Life of Christ. 
Witte, Em. de . . . 346 Interior of the Church at Delft. 
Wj^nanta, J 350, 851, 352, 455. Landscapes. 



n »» 

» »» 

>» »» 



AMSTERDAM: THE TBIPPENHUI8. 



309 



THE PICTUEE GALLEEIES OF HOLLAND. 



THE MUSEUM OF THE TEffPENHUIS AT AMSTERDAM. 



Backhuizeu, Ludolf . 
Bega, Cornelia . . 
Berchem, Nicholas . 



»> 



>» 



>» 



»> 



»> 



» 



Bol, Ferdinand . 



» 



»» 



»> 



»» 



Both, Jan and Andries 
Bourdon, S^bastien . 
Brouwer, Adrian . 



»» 



»j 



Brueghel, Jan (Velours) 



jj 



»» 



i» 



Grayer, Gaspar de 
Cuyp, Albert . . 



»» 



>» 



Dow, Grerhard 



>» 



♦> 



Diirer, Albrecht . 
Dusart, Comelis . 



»* 



j« 



Dyck, Anton "van 
Flinck, Govert . 
Francken, H., elder 
Goyen, Jan van . 
Haarlem, Cornells van 



Catalogue of 1872. 
No. 
5 Embarkation of Jan de Witt, 
19 A Peasants* Concert. 
21 Italian Landscape. 

24 The Three Flocks of Sheep. 

25 The Cattle crossing the Ford. 

26 The FerryAxMt. 
34 His own Portrait. 

36 Portrait of Admiral de Beuter. 

37 Mother and ttoo Children. 

42 Italian Landscape. 

43 Marriage of St. Catharine. 

51 A Village Bevel 

52 Peasants Fighting. 

53 Town on the Banks of a Biver. 
56 The Entry to a Wood. 
61 The Adoraiion of the Shepherds. 

65 Shepherds in a Landscape, 

66 Cock and Turkey Fighting. 
72 Curiosity. 
74 The Night'schodl. 

81 Portrait of Pirkheimer. 

82 StroUing Musicians. 

83 The Fishrmarket. 

86 Portraits of two Children of Charles I. 
93 The Civil Guard. 
95 Abdication of Charles V. 

103 A Biver. 

109 Massacre of the Innocents^ 



810 



AMSTERDAM: THE TBIPPENHUIS. 



Hackaert, Jan, and 
Adrian yan de V elde . 





) JL- A Ol JAO • • • 


•9 n . . . 

Heem, Jan de . . 
„ Jan David de 
Heist, B. van der 


»» 


»» 


w 


»> 


>♦ 


» 


»> 


>» 



n 



91 



Heyden, Jan van der 

99 »» 

Hondecoeter, M. 



99 
»» 
»» 
»» 



Hooghe, Pieter de 

j» >» 

Huysum, Jan van 

»> »i 

Jardin, Karel dn . 



?» 



»» 



M 



»> 



Jordaens, Jacob . 
Kalf, WiUem . . 
Keyser, Theodore de 
Koning, Philip . 
Lingelbach, Jan . 
Maas, Nicholas . 
Metsn, Gktbriel 



»» 



>» 



Mierevelt, Michael 
Mieris, Frans van 
„ WiUem van 
MigBon, Abraham 



van 



No. 



Ill The Avenue. 

113 The Jolly FeOmjo. 

114 PartraiU of Eimtdf and of his Wife. 

116 SlUUife, 

117 Floioert and Fruit, 

122 Male PoHraU. 

123 Female Portrait 

125 Banquet of the Civil Guard. 

126 The Arquebusiers, 

127 Portrait of Admiral van Nes, — ^Tl 

background painted by Backhnizei 

128 Portrait of the Wife of Admiral van N( 

131 The Drawbridge. 

132 A Dutch Canal 
144 Dead Birds. 

146 GeesCy Ducks^ dto. 

147 Birds. 

150 The Frightened Hen. 

151 The Floating Feather. 

157 His own Portrait. 

158 The Stare-room. 

163 Fruits. 

164 Flowers. 

167 His own Portrait. 

169 Syndics. 

171 The Muleteers. 

175 A Satyr. 

176 StiU-life. 

177 Family Portraits. 
182 ^<ry to a Forest. 
199 2^ Biding-school. 
203 The Dreamer. 

206 The Breakfast. 

207 I^e Dnnker. 
208-215. PortraiU. 
216 27i6 Lute-player, 
218 !Z%e Fish-shop. 

221 Flowera aud a Yoae* 



AMSTERDAM: TEE TBIPPENHUI8. 



311 



Moreelse, Paul . 



}> 



» 



Moucheron and Ad. 

de Velde • . 
Mytens, A., younger 



>» 



»> 



Neefs, Pieter, elder 
Near, Artus van der 
Netscher, Gbspar 

Ostade, Adrian van 

» »» 

„ Isaac van 

Foel, E. van der . 

Foelenburg, Gomelis 

Potter, Paul . . 



>» 



»» 



» 



» 



» 



» 



Bembrandt van Byn 



>» 



»> 



Buysdael, Jacob . 
Buysch, Bachel . 
Schalken, 6. . . 



>» 



van 



n 



Slingeland, Pieter van . 

»» 
Snyders, Frans 

Steen, Jan 



»» »» 

»» >» 

»» » 

» » 



Teniers, D., younger 



» 



w 



»» 



>» 



» 



»» 



Terbmg; Gerard 



No. 

227 Female Portrait. 

229 The LUOe Princess. 

230 JtoZton ZaiMZ^eoptf. 

234 Portrait of Admiral Tromp. 

235 Portrait of the Wife of Admiral Tromp. 
238 Interior of Notre Dame at Antwerp. 
240 Winter Landscape. 

242 Portrait. 

243 ul Mother and her Children. 

245 ul iS<tt(2id. 

246 Traveller's Halt. 

247 ul FtOo^e Inn. 
253 Interior. 

258 2%<s BaO^ers. 
260 The StrauHmtiers. 

261 n6^i»e. 

263 OrpAefM a7u2 ^m Xu<e. 

264 Shepherds and their Flocks. 

294 The Syndics. 

295 T^ iVtgW Fofc^. 
288 T^ TTo^/olZ. 
292 The Bouquet. 

306 Ta8<e8 l>t/0r. 

307 Tastes Differ. 

311 !Z%6 JRicA Jfan. 

312 The Rehearsal. 

313 Frut^ amZ (?am«. 

314 Dead Game. 

319 The Happy Return. 

321 T^ Charlatan. 

322 T^e Parrot's Cage. 

323 J FtZZo^ Tr6<2(Z%. 

324 2%e F^ o/ St. Nicholas. 

327 !7%6 F«/2age Inn. 

328 2%6 Ouardrro<m. 

329 7%6 ^<mr o/ i268<. 

330 The Temptation of St. Antium^. 

331 PatrnwiX Admoe. 



312 



AMSTERDAM: THE TBIPPENRUI8. 





No. 


Terbiirg, Qerard . 


. . 332 The Peace of Mitngter. 


Yelde, Adrian van de . 359 T^ Ferry-hoot. 


»» »» »» 


. 360 TJieHut. 


„ WUlem van de . 356 Taking of ihe * Royal Frinee: 


»» M 


. 357 Bringing the * Royal Pnnoe ' into Port, 


W W 


358 TJie Harhour of Amsterdam, 


Vols, Adrian de . . 


,. S72 The Viotinrplayer. 


Weenix, J. B. . . 


.. 275 The Country iSeat, 


»» • 


. 376 Game and Fruit. 


»» • 


. . 377 Dead Game. 


Werff, Adrian van der . 378 His oum Portrait. 


n »» 


. 381 Hoty Family, 


Wouwerman, Philip . 


. . 388 The Riding-school, 


»» »> 


. 391 The Slag-hunt, 


>» » 


, 392 Heron-hwUing. 


»♦ »» • 


. 394 The Watering-place. 


»» » • 


. 395 The Spirited White TTorse. 


WynantSf Jan » . 


, 398 Undulating Landscape. 


»> w • • 


. 400 The Farm. 


The OoLLEonoN beq 


ueathed by Monsieur D upper to the Trippenhnii 




at Amsterdam. 




No. 


Backhuizen, L. . . 


. II. The Zuiderzee, 


»r 


, 111. The Y near Amsterdam. 


Both, Jan and Andri 


es . Yin. Italian Landscape. 


Dow, Gerhard . . 


, XIV. jHm oum Portrait. 


I>Q8art, Cornelia . 


. XV. Village Kermess. 


Goyen, Jan van . . 


. XVII. View of Dordrecht. 


Hals, Frans . 


, XX. The Jester. 


Hobbema^ M. 


. XXTV. The WaiermiU. 


Jardin, Elarel du 


. XXVI. Landscape and Animals, 


Eoning, Philip . . 


, XXynL Landscape. 


Lingelbach, J. . . 


, XXX. Landscape and Figures. 


Maas, Nicholsks . . 


. XXXI. Wmnan Spinning, 


MieriSi Frans van 


. XXXII. Fragility. 


Mignon, A. . . . 


. XXXIV. FruU, 


Ostade, Adrian van . 


. XXXVn. The^ Charlatan. 



» 



» 



XXXVlll. The Bakw, 



AMSTERDAM: THE VAN DEB HOOP. 



313 



Romeyn, Willem . 
Buysdael, Jacob . 
Buysdael, Jacob . 

„ Solomon 
Steen, Jan . . 



» 



» 



Terburg, G. 



>» 



No. 
XLI. Landscape and Animaie, 
XLII. Winter Scene, 
XLIV. View of Ha>arlem, 
XLV. Landscape, 
XLVII. The Charlatan. 
XLIX. The Fite. 
LI. His ovm Portrait. 
LIL Portrait of his Wife. 
LIX. The Encampment. 



Wouwerman, Philip . 
Wynants and A. van de 

Yelde LXI. Landscape. 

A special department in this moseom is devoted to the care of the 
yery complete collection of Rembrandt's etchings, which may be seen on 
application to the keeper. 



THE VAN DER HOOP MUSEUM AT AMSTER 




Catalogub op 1872. 


Backhuizen, Ludolf . , 


xio. 
4 View of the T, 


Bega, Comelis . . 


7 Interior, 


Berckheyden, Job . 


17 Interior of a Church. 


Both, Jan and Andries 


20 Landscape — Artist Painting. 


Brekelenkamp . . 


23 Tailors Semng. 


Cuyp, Albert . . . 


28 Cattle, 


>» w • • • 


29 View of Dordrecht. 


Dow, Gterhard 


30 A Fisher-woman, 


Dyck, Anton van 


35 PoHrait, 


Hals, Frans . 


42 PortraU of an Old Woman. 


Hobbema, M. . . . 


46 Landscape. 


»» . . 1 


47 Landscape. 


Hooghe, Pieter de . . 


49 The Musicians. 


»» »» • 


50 Interior. 


>» >» • ■ 


51 Interior. 


»» »» • • 


52 Interior. 


»» >» • ' 


53 A Dutch Courtyard. 


Hoogstraten, S. van . . 


54 The Sick Lady. 


Huysum, Jan van . . 


57 Fruit and Flowers. 


Maas, Niohoias . . . 


6Q Woman Spinning. 



314 



AMSTERDAM: THE VAN DEB HOOP. 



Meer, Jan yan der, or 

Vermeer of Delft 
Metsu, Grabriel . 



»> 



»> 



Mieris, Frans 
younger . . 
Mignon, Abraham 
Musfioher, M. van 
Neer, Artus van der 
Ostade, Adrian van 
Potter, Paul . . 



yan. 



w 



» 



Bembrandt yan Ryn 
Bubens, P. P. 



» 



Buysdael, Jacob . 



»> 



9> 



)» 



»> 



Steen, Jan . . 



» 



» 



»> 



» 



Teniers, Dayid, younger. 



» 



» 



» 



>» 



>» 



>» 



Terburg, Gerard . 
Velde, Adrian van de 
"Willem van de 



>» 



9> » 

"Weenix, Jan . . 
Wouwerman, Philip . 
"Wynants, Jan 



No. 

129 Lady Beading. 

68 The Hunter's Present 

69 The Fish-vxman, 

74 The Apothecary, 
77 Fruit 

80 Interior, 

81 Skating Scene, 
86 Peasants* Party, 

90 Horses in a Field, 

91 Cows in a Field, 

95 The Betrothed Jewess, 

93 Portrait of Helena Fourment 

94 Portrait of Maria di Medici. 

96 Landscape, 

97 Skating Scene, 
99 Landscape, 

105 Family Feast 

106 The Doctor's Visit 
108 The Drinking PaHy, 

115 J. Dutch Kermess, 

116 Bdor« Drinking, 

117 Jnferior. 

118 jBo^ arki Dog. 

121 Portraits of Himself and Family, 

124 2^ Cannon Shot 

127 The Beach, 

136 Dead G^ame. 

144 Xan(2«ea2>e. 

145, 147, 148. Landscapes, 



THE SIX VAN HILLEGBOM COLLECTION AT 

AMSTERDAM. 

No. 511 Heebengracht. 
No. 
JBerobem, NieboJaa . . — One oi t^o eiLaxii^\e^^. 



AMSTERDAM: THE SIX. 



315 



Berckheyden, G. 
Brekelenkamp 
Cuyp, Albert . 



» 



>» 



Dow, Gerhard 



»> 



»> 



» »» • 
Dusart 

Hals, Frans . 
Hobbema . 
Hooghe, Pieter de 
Koning, Sedomon 
Maas, Nicholas . 
Meer, Jan van der 

Delft . . 



, of 



»> 



Ostade, Adrian van 
Potter, Paul . . 



Bembrandt 



»» 



» 



Bombouts, Theodore 
Buysdael . . . 
Steen, Jan 
Teniers, David 
Terburg, G. . . 



>» 



Yelde, A. van de 
Wouwerman, Philip 



>» 



»» 



No. 

— One example. 

— The Three Ages. 

— View of Dort. 

— MoonUgJU Scene. 

— The Dentist. 

— A Oirl loith a Basket of Fruit. 

— A CkmdUMght Effect. 

— One example. 

— Hie Guitar-player. 

— Examples. 

— The Linen-press. 

— Old Man in his Study, 

— Hie Eavesdropper. 

— Woman pouring out Milk. 

— View in Delft, 

— The Fish-wife showing Fish. 

— Life-size Equestrian Portrait of Tutp. 

— The Dairymaid washing her MilkpaUs. 

— A half-length Portrait of the Burgo- 

master Six. 

— Portrait of the Mother of Burgomaster 

Six. 

— Study in Bistre. 

— Landscape. 

— Examples. 

— The Marriage. 

— The Drummer, &o. 

— The Duet. 

— A Qirl Writing. 

— Sea-coast at Scheveningen, 

— A Stable. 

— Landscape. 



»> 



» 



and 



Ruysdael 



— Landscape. 



816 



AMSTERDAM AND HAABLEM, 



THE VAN LOON COLLECTION AT AMSTERDAM. 



Backhuizen, Ludolf . 
Heyden, Jan van der 
Hooghe, Pieter de 
Huysmn, Jan van 
Maas, Nicholas . 
Metsu, Gabriel . 
Ostade, Adrian van 
Bembrandt . 



»» 



Steen, Jan . . 
Terburg, G. . . 
Yelde, Adrian van de 
Wouwerman, Philip . 



No. 501 Heebenqbaoht. 

No. 

— A Boat in a Storm. 

— View in a Dutch Street 

— A Garden with Figures. 

— Two Flower and Fruit Pieces. 

— Housekeeper paying the MUh-girL 

— Two examples. 

— Outside a Cabaret 

— A fuHUlength Portrait of Mr, Daey. 

— A futtrlengih Portrait of Mrs, Daey, 

— The Prodigal Son, 

— Two Interiors, 

— A large example and others. 

— A large example and others. 



THE TOWNHALL AT AMSTERDAM. 

No. 



Bol, Ferdinand . 

Hals, Frans . 
Heist, B. van der 



— The Fotir Begents of the Leprosy Hos- 

pital, 

— Arquebusiers, 

— Arquebusiers, 



THE TOWNHALL OF HAARLEM. 
Catalogue op 1875. 

No. 



Bray, Jan de . 



» 
» 



» 



Oomelisz, Cornells, of 

Haarlem «... 

Male^ Frana . • , . 



12 Group of Old Ladies, 

13 Begents of the Leprosy Hospital, 

14 Group of Old Ladies, 

23 A Feast of Archers, — And others. 
54 A FeoMt o{ ike AToKeT% of St. G«or^«, 



THE HAGUE, 



317 



Hals, Frans 



Heemskerck, Marten van 



» 



» 



Verspronck, Jan . . 
Vroom, Henrick Cornelia 



No. 

55 A Feast of the Archers of 8t Adrian. 

56 A Feast of the Archers of 8t. Adrian. 

57 A Feast of the Archers of 8t. Adrian. 

58 Officers of the Archers of 8t. George. 

59 Regents of the Hospital of 8t. Elizabeth. 

60 Regents of a Hospital. — Unfinished. 

61 Female Regents of a Hospital. — Un- 

finished. 
63 8t. Luke painting the Virgin. 
67 8courging of Christ. — And others. 
115, 116, 117. PoHraits. 
124 The Arrival of Leicester at Flushing in 
1586. 



THE HOFFE VAN BERESTYN AT HAARLEM. 



No. 



Hals, Frans . 



99 



»> 



— A Portrait of Nicholas van Berestyn. 

— A Portrait of the 8ister of Nicholas van 

Berestyn. 

— A Family Group. 

— Portrait of a Young Child. 



THE ROYAL MUSEUM AT THE HAGUK 
Catalogue op 1874. 



Aelst, Willem van 
Backhnizen, L. . 
Berchem, Nicholas 
Bloemeurt, Abraham 
Bol, Ferdinand . 



>♦ 



»> 



Both, J. and A. . 
Brueghel, Jan (Velours) 
Gomella van Haarlem 



Dutch 8chool. 

3 8l£(Uife. ^ 

5 William III. Disembarking. 
10 The Boar-hunt. 
13, 14. Mythological 8ubjects. — And others. 

15 Portrait of Admiral Ruyter. 

16 The 8on of Admiral Ruyter. 
17, 18. Italian Landscapes. 

200 Paradise. 
19 MoMocre of the Inuoceuls. 



818 



THE HAGUE. 



Gomelis van Haarlem 
Cnyp, Albert . 
Dow, Gerhard . . 



»» 



» 



Everdingen, G. van . 
Heem, Jan David de 
„ Cornells de . 
Heist, B. van der . . 
Heyden, Jan van der 
Hoekgeest, Gerard van . 



»» 



»> 



Hondecoeter, M. . 

Huysum, Jan van 

»» ♦» 

Jardin, Elarel du . 

Keyser, Theodore de 

Lingelbach, Jan . 



>» 



n 



Meer, Van der, of Delft, 

orVermeer. 
Metsu, Gabriel . 
Mierevelt, M. J. van. 
Mieris, Frans van, elder. 



»» 



» 



»» 



»» 



»» 



» 



Moreelse, Paul . 
Moro, Antonio 
Musscher, M. van 
Netscher, Gaspar 
Ostade, Adrian van 

>» » 

Potter, Paul . . 



>» 



»> 



Pfnacker, Adam . 
Bembrandt Fan Ejn 



No. 

19 bis. Mythological Subfeet. 

21 Salmonrfishing near Dordrecht. 

28 The Young Mother. 

29 Young Woman holding a Lamp, 
33 Portraits, 

88 Fruit, 

40 Fruit. 

42 Portrait of Paul Potter. 

41 View in a Dutch Town, 

45 Interior of a Chwch. 

46 Interior of a Church, 

49 Cheese and Ducks. 

50 Fowls and Ducks* 

56 Frmt. 

57 FUwers, 

58 A Cascade in Italy, 

59 A Landscape and Figures, 

61 Portrait of a Magistrate, 

62 The Burgomasters of Amsterdam, 

69 March of WiUiam of Orgidfge to Am$tet 

da/m, 

70 Charles II, leaving for England, 

72 View of Delft. 

74 The Amateurs of Music, 

76-84. Ihkraits. 

85 The 8oap4mbhles, 

86 Portrait 

87 Portraits of Himself and his Wife, 
96, 97. Portraits. 

95 3f a26 Portrait. 

100 Portraits of Himself and Family, 

101 Portraits of Himself and Family, 

104 Pecwanfo tn an 7nn. 

105 The Fiddler. 
Ill 2%e Young Bull. 

113 3f6a(2ot<;a arui Cattle. 
107 Tfee Torrent. 

114 Simeou iu iKe TewwpU, 





THE HAGUE, 319 


Hembrandt van Byn 


No. 
. 115 Professor Tulp giving an Anatomy 




Lesson. 


»» »» 


. 116 Susannah in the Bath. 


»» » 


. 117 PoHrait of a Youth. 


>» » 


. 118 His own Portrait in Officer's Dress. 


Buysch, Baohel . . 


. 120 FUnffers. 


» »> • ' 


. 121 Flowers. 


Buysdael, Jacob . . 


. 124 View of Haarlem. 


Savery, Jacob . , 


. 126 A Fair. 


Schalken, Godfried 


. 128 Young Woman at her Toilette. 


»» « 


. 129 Genre Piece. 


» »> 


. 130 The Charlatan. 


Steen, Jan . . 


. . 134 The Dentist. 


»» »> • • 


, . 135 The Menagerie. 


»» »> • • 


.. 136 The Doctor's Visit 


>» »> • • 


.. 1S7 The Doctor's Visit. 


j» » • • 


. . 138 PoHraits of his Family. 


»> » • • 


. . 139 The Tavern.— A\bo known M The OyOer 




Feast, and as La Vie Humaine. 


Terburg, Gerard . . 


, . 14t4: The Despatch. 


>» 99 


, . 145 His own Portrait. 


Troost, Oomelifl . 


. . — Several examples. 


Uchtervelt, Jacob 


. . 162 The FislMnerchant. 


Yelde, Adrian ybh d( 


) . 165 ^ Dutch Beach. 


„ Willem van d( 


3 . 168 ^ Calm. 


VHet,H.W.van. . 


. 169 Interior of a Church. 


Weenix, Jan . . 


. . 173 The Dead Swan. 


Werff, A. van der 


. 176 The Flight into Egypt. 


Wouwerman, Philip 


. . 182 Leaving the Stables. 


>» » 


. 184 Country Riding-school. 


>» >» 


. . 185 T^ Hay-caH. 


»» »» 


. 186 Large BatHe-piece. 


>» » 


,. 1S7 The Camp. 


>» »> 


. . 188 Hunters Reposing. 



Flemish School. 
Brueghel, Jan (Velours). 200 The Garden of Eden. 
Goex, or Coques, Gonzales 202 Iviterior of a PictuTe QQXX«r^« 
Dfck, Anton van . • 2)6 Portrait. 



820 



THE HAGUE. 



Dyok, Anton van . . 



>» 



»> 



» 



»» 



Pourbos, Peter, younger, 
Bubens, P. P. . . . 



>» 



Snyders, Frans . . . 
Teniers, David, younger. 



»♦ 



» 



♦» 



Weyden, Bogier van der. 



No. 

204 Female Portrait. 

205 Family Cfroup, 

206 Portrait of QuirUyn Simons, 

212 Moseg with the Tables of the Law. 

213 PoHrait of Isabella Brandt 

214 Portrait of Helena Fourmeni. 

216 Adam and Eve in the Gqrden of Eden. — 
Landscape, &c. by BmeghcJ. 

222 The Stag-hunt. — Lajidscape by Bubens. 

223 The Kitchen. 

224 The Alchemist, 
226 A Deposition. 



Beham, Bartholomaus 



>» 



» 



» 



» 



Holbein, Hans, younger. 



»» 



»> 



» 



» 



»» 



»> 



German SchooL 

231 PoHrait of a Child. 

232 PoHrait of a ChOd. 

233 Portrait of a Child. 

237 PoHrait of a Young Woman, 

238 PoHrait of BobeH Cheseman. 
240 Male PoHrait. 



Bourdon, S^bastien 
Vemet, C. J. . . 



>» 



French School, 

250 A Group of Merchants. 

252 PoH of Leghorn. 

253 Tivoli. 



Velasquez, Diego . , 
Zereso, or Gereso, Mateo . 



Spanish School. 

257 PoHrait of Don Baltasar as a Child. 
259 A Ma>gdalen, 



Italian School, 

These are principally copies, and the museum contains no work of 
great merit. 



THE Hl&PK 



321 



THE TOWNHALli AT THE HAGUE. 

Oatalogub of 1870« 

This collection is only interesting for several works by Johannes van 
Bavesteyn. The best fkre as follows : . 

No. 
Bavesteyn, Johannes vai^ . 18 The Magistrates and ArquehmierB in 

16J7-18, 
., . 22 The Magistrates of the Hague in 1836. 

y, , ^ , . 81 Chief Arquebusiers, 



THE STEENQBAOHT OGLLJJCTION AT THE HAGUE. 

Boom J, 
Modem French Works, 



Hackaert and Wynants 
Hooghe, Pieter de 
Maas, Nicholas . 
Potter, Panl . . 
Rembrandt 
Bubens ... 
Velde, Adrian van de 



Ostade, Adrian van . 
Steen, Jan . . . 
Teniers, D., younger 
Velde, Adrian van de 
Wouwerman, Philip . 



Room lit 

Ko. 

— A Landscape, 

— An Interior, 

— Oenre Scene., 

— Small example. 

— Baihsheba. 

— Infant Saviowr, 

— Small example. 

BoomlilJ 

r— Examples. 

— Portraits of Himself and Family. 

— The Works of Mercy. 

— Two examples. 

— Two examples. 



322 



LEIDEN AND BOTTEBDAM. 



THE STEDELYK MUSEUM AT LEIDEN. 



Catalogue op 1876. 
No. 



Engelbertsz, Gornelis 



9 AUar-piece in three oompartments : 
The Crucifixion in the centre; The 
Saenfice of Isaac on one wing; 2%e 
Bnuen Serpent on the other wing. 

10 AUar-pieee in three parts : A Depori- 
tion in the centre; 8t Cecilia and 
St. Mary Magdalen on one wing; 
Gregory, Bishop of UtrecM, and 
others, on the other wing. 

17 AUar-piece in three compartments: 
The Last Judgment. On the outer 
side of the ^ings are Figures of 
St. Peter and St. Paul 

There are no other works of importance in this museum. 



Lucas van Leiden . 



THE MUSEUM AT ROTTERDAM. 



Beerstraten, J. 
Berckheyden . 
Bol, Ferdinand 
Both, J. . . 
Cuyp, Albert . 



»» 



»» 



Delphius . 
Eeokhout . 
Fabritius, Earel 
Goyen, Jan van 
Mala, Fmns . 
Heem, Jaa David de 



No. 

9 Amsterdam TownhaU in Winter. 
11 The Old Exchange at Amsterdam, 
20 Portrait of a YouUi. 
25 A Landscape. 

40 Landscape. 

41 Interior. — And others. 
57 A Portrait. 

311 BuihandBoaz. 
69 A Head. 
73 A Biver Scene. 
77 A Man in Black. 
80 Fruit. 



BOTTEBDAM, 



823 



>» 



Pencz, G. 
Bembrandt 

Buysch, Rachel . 
Buysdael, Jacob . 

Steen, Jan 
Weenix . . 



»» 



Witte, Emanuel de 
Zorg .... 



No. 

82 Portraits, 

— A Landscape, 

90, 91. Hunting Scenes. 
97 Vegetables. 

— A Landscape. 
122 A Landscape. 

127 A PoHrait. 

128 Portrait of an Old Lady. 
130 T?ie Fish-seller. 

133, 135. Interiors. 

143 ^ Landscape. 

145 An Assembly of Regents* 

152 Qroup of Portraits. 

166 An Interior. 

167 Landscape, 
108 A Devotee. 

181 An Allegdry—oAixiding to the Triplie 

Alliance. 
188 Flowers, 

185 A Sandy Boad. 

186 The Amsterdam Fish-market. 
266 Feast of St. Niclwlas. 

239 Dead Game. 
302 ToUt Asleep. 
249 The Fish-iffife. 
324 The Market. 



Heist, B. van der 
Hobbema . 
Hondius, Abraham 
Kalf, WUlem . . 
Koning, Jacob de 
Meer, Van der, Jan, elder 
Metsu, Gabriel 
Mierevelt . 
Mieris, F. van 
Molenaer . 
Moucheron, F. 
Mytens 

Netscher, Gaspar 
Ostade, Isaac van 



>» 



-i^ 



S9H 



AUG8BUBG: THE QALLEEF. 



THE PICTUEE GALLEEIES OF GERMANY. 



■•o*- 



THE GALLERY OP PICTURES AT AUGSBURG. 

Gatalooub of 1869, by Pbof. Rud. Mabgobait. 



Altdorfer, Albrecbt . . 



Amberger, Christopher, 
attributed to • • 

Bourguignon .... 
Brueghel, Jan, and Ru- 
bens 

Burgkmair, Hans . . 



>» 



»» 



w 



» 



Cranach, Lucas, elder . 



>» 



ff 



>» 



»» 



»» 



9} 



Vjrok, Anton van . . 



No. 

47-51. An important altar-piece in five 
panels, of which the centre is a 
CruoifloBton. The side panels repre- 
sent each one of the thieves; the 
outside panels the Anntmdaiitm. 
Painted in 1517. 

696 So-called Portrait of Henry VIII, of 
England. — ^This fine portrait is now 
believed to be the work of Barth, 
Beham, and to represent the C^ur- 
fOrst Otto Heinrich von Bayeni. 

818, 814. Two Battte-pieees, 

119 Landscape and Figures, 

6, 7, 8. Aa altar-piece. In the centre 
Christ and Virgin with Angels and 
Saints. On the side-wings Patri- 
archs, Prophets, and Samts. Painted 
in 1507. Inferior to his later works. 

19, 20, 21, 22. Four compartments for two 
of the Seven Churches of Rome, 
painted for a cbapel in the convent 

24 Three panels for another of the Seven 
Churches. And other works. 

13 The Host of Pharaoh in the Bed Sea. 

15 Sa/irifice of Isaae, 
692 Ecce Hcyrao. 

104 StiAdi| of a Mau (m Honrt^ba^^. 



AU08BUBG AND BEBLIN. 



'CMMR 

aZ8> 



Dyck, Anton van . . 
Holbein, Hans, elder 



Holbein, Hans, elder 
»> ?» « 

lolbein, Hans, younger . 



»» 



»> >» 



at- 



tributed to . 



Kneller, Sir Qodirey 



Moroni, G. B. . . 
Os, Jan van . 
Procaocini, Oamillo . 
Hibera .... 
Schalken, G. . . 
Tintoretto . . . 
Vinci, L. da, attributed 

to 

Wohlgemuth . . 



V 



Zeitblom, B. 
Zurbaran . 



No. •,.:./•■:•::; 

118 Portrait of the marine'padnter -Aerpp^, 

147 Ths Four BepentantSinnert before^H^t, 

25, 26, 27. Three oompartmeuts fpa: ao^ 

of thel Seven Churches of Bcmw*. 

painted for a chapel in the convent. 

84, 85, 86. A large Altar-piece in three parts. 

683,664,685. The Crucifixion, Hie i)&- 
went. The Entooibment, < 1;/ 

672 PortraU of a Woman,-^N&tj sinaikv 

f673, 674, 675, 676. The Madonna, ChUd, 
and 8t, Anna, 8t, Vhrich^and Bt 
Wolfgang, Martyrdom of- 8L Fetkr, 
Beheadal of St, CkdhariM.-*^2LixAib^ 
in 1512. Attributed with hesilSatioA 
in the catalogue to the younger 
Holbein, these are still regarded .by 

^ some as the work of the elder. ' ^ 

169 Portrait of Queen HemriettOr Marioi^ 
After Van Dyck. 

274 laahetta of PortugdL 

631 Flower-piece, 

237 Hdy Family, . . < • 

372 8t, Sebastian, 

103 Mocking of Christ, 

265 Chri«t with Martha and Mofty, 

2^ Bead of a Girl. 

42 The Besurrection, 

iS The Crucifixion, 

79-82. The History of 8t, Valentin, ^■ 
296 SLFramis. 



THE ROYAL PICTUBE GALLERY AT BBRLIJ^. . 

There is no printed official catalogue of the Berlin Museum, but' in 
each room cards are affixed indicating the names of the painters oC 
most works. But many recent aoquiaUioiA W^^ \)^i^Ti \&s^<b^ ^s^'^^q^^ 



326 



BERLIN: THE MUSEUM. 



many fine pictures exist without numbers ; and none of course in connec- 
tion with such pictures can be attached in the catalogue presented here. 
Following this catalogue is a second, of the Suermondt Collection, 
recently acquired, which having its own proper numbers must neoes- 
aarily be noted separately. 



Aelst^ W. van 
Altdorfer, Albrecht 
Amberger, 0. . . 



»» 



AngeUoo, Fra, attri 

buted to . . 
Antonello da Messina 
Art, B. van . . 



»» 



»» 



»» »> • • 
Bartolo, Taddeo . 

Bartolommeo, Fra, 

tributed to 

Bassano, J. . . 



»» 



Bega, Gomelis 



>» 



>» 



Bellini, Giovanni 









Beltraffio . 
Berchem, N. 



Bigio, Francia 

Bissolo 

Bol,F. . . . 

Bonifazio, attributed 

Bordone, P. . . 



>( 



tf 



at- 



to 



attributed to 



*/ 



w 



No. 
975 8tm4ife, 

— Two small works. 

583 Pertrait of Sebastian Munster. 

— Portrait of Charles V. 

60 Meuhnna and Child, 
8 Head of St Sebastian. - 
934b. Flowers and StiU-Ufe, 
13 Virgin and Child. 
18 SmaU PoHrait—Dsited 1478. 
1122 Assumptum of the Virgin. 

249 Assumption of the Virgin. 
314 The Good Samaritan. 
318 Male Portrait. 

871 Genre Svbject. 

872 Genre Subject. 
874 Genre Sutject. 

4 Dead Christ tcith Virgin and St. John. 
11 Madonna and ChtkU 
28 Dead Christ wnd two Angels. — In the 
style of Maotegna. 
207 Saint Barbara. 
887 Shepherds and Herds. 
896 Italian Landscape. 

— Male Portrait. 
43 The Besurrection. 

809 Fevfidle Portrait. 

200 The Woman taken in Adultery. 

191 An AUar-piece, 

198 Portrait of a Lady in a Hat. 

169 Men playing Chess. 

177 M€idonna aud SaixA*. 



BERLIN: THE MUSEUM. 



m 





No. 


Borgognone, A. . . . 


51 Madtyima and Child. 


»» • 




52 Madonna Enthroned and Saints. 


Both, J. and A. . 




803 Landscape, 


BotticeUi,S. . . 




102 Madonnd and Angels. 


» • • 




106 Madonna as9d Child, and two Saints. 


»» • < 




1124 A Venus. 


♦) 




1128 St Sebastian. 


j» 




— Portrait of a ]^oman. 


Bouts, Dierick 




. 533 Elijah in ihe Desert. 


>» ») ' 




. 539 Feast of the Passover. 


Bril, Paul . . 




714 Landscape. 


Bronzino, A. . 




. 338 MaJe Portrait. 


Brueghel, Jan 




, 678 Venus and VvXcan. 


•« «• 




. 688 Xofkfocape— Figures by Rottenhammer. 


»> j» 




. 688a. a Bed Vase with Flowers. 


„ .* 1 




742 Landscape and Birds. 


„; Pieter, youngei 


* 721 Christ on the Bead to Calvary. 


Bruyn, Bart 


588 A Portrait. 


Burgkmair, Hans 


. 591 A PoriraU. 


Galcar, Johan Ton . . 


190 Male PortraU. 


Cauale, Ant. (Ganaletto) 


490 Venetian Scene. 


M »» >♦ 


493 VeneUan Scene. 


?> 11 »» 


501 Venetian Scene. 


>» 11 11 


503 Venetian Scene. 


Cano, Alonso . . . . 


414b. SL Agnes. 


CSaracci, Annibale 


370 A Holy Family. 


Oaravaggio (Amerighi) 


. 359 Group €f AposUes. 


91 •• 


. 365 SL Matthew and an Angel. 


Oariani, attributed to 


12 Two Beads. 


Caroto .... 


40 Madonna and Child. 


Oarpaccio, V. . . . 


23 St. Peter and Saints. 


Carre&o, Juan de 


. 407 Portrait 


Catena. V. . . . 


32 Male Portrait. 


Christus, Petrus . . 


. 529a. ^nntinctafe'on and Adoration. 


11 i» • • 


. 529b. Xa8< Judgment 


Cima da Conegliano 


2 Jlfa<2an2ia and 0/iiZ(2 enthroned with 


• 


Saints. 


*i f» * 


15 JUTtrade of St. Mark. 


.« tj < 


17 McuUmna aud GUiXd.. 


CJaude QeUe . 


• • 


428 A Landscape. 



828 



BERLIN: TflE 3iU8EUM, 



Glonet, Francois . . 
Gomelis van Haarlem 
Coneggio (Allegri) 



>9 



»» 



Gosimo, Piero di . 
Costa, Lorenzo 



n 



•f 



Goxcie, Michael . 



»♦ >« • • 

Granach, Lncas, elder 



V 



»> 



>» 



« 



„ „ younger 

Gredi, Lorenzo da 



«» 



>» 



Cuyp, A. . . 
David, Gerhardt 
Denner, B. 
Bolci, Carlo • 
Dossi, DoBSO . 
Dow, G. . . 



9» 



Dacq, J. le 
Dyck, Anton van 



5« 
>» 
>» 



>» 
>» 



Eeckhout, G. van den 



»> 



» 



Everdingen, J. van . 
Ejck, H. and J. van . 



No. 

472,475. Portraits. 

l^BaOuh^xi. 

218 Leda and Nymphs, 

216 A copy or replica of the Jo at Yienna, 

JKo. 19 SaUe VI. 1" e'tage. 
107 Venus and Sleeping Mars. 
112 Fresentaiion in the Temple, 
115 A Pieta. 

524 Copy of Van Eyck's Adoraiion of (he 

Lamb* 

525 AjQother portion of the same. 

590 A PoHraiU 
594 Venub.and Cupid, 
1190 Venus and Cupid. 
598 The Fountain of Youth. 
100 Madonna adoring Infant Christ. 
103 KneeUng Magd^ilen. 

— 8maU Landscape and Cows, 
578 Crucifixion. 

1014b. BmaUPoHrait. 

— 8t, John writing his €hspel. 
258 Madonna in Glory with Saints. 
848 Bepentanl Magdalen. 

854 The Larder, 
864: StOdiers on Forage. 
768 A PoHrait. 
770 The Mocking of ChrisL 
778 A Pieta, 

782 'Portrait of Prince Thomas of Carignan. 
788 Portrait of Ltfanta IrnheUa of Spain. 
790 Children of Charles L with Dogs. 
794 Descent of the Hdy GhosL 
804 Jairus's Daughter. 
820 Christ in the Temple. 
829 Mercury and Argus. 
852 Landscape. 

512h517< Six panels belon^ng to the famous 
V ftlt»x-p\^ce, the Adoration o/fAeXamft, 

^ , ^ to tbfe ^»X^ 



»» 



»» 



BERLIN: THE MUSEUM. 



829 



Eyck, H. and J. van . . 

Eyck, Jan van . . . 
Fiorenzo di Lorenzo . . 
Flinck, Govert . • . 
Floris, Frans .... 
Forli, Melozzo da, air 
tributed to ... . 
Francia, Francesco . . 



»» 



»» 



Franco, Battista • . . 

Fyt, Jan 

Gaddi, Taddeo . . 
Ghirlandajo, Dom., at- 



No. 

518-523. The reverse sides, which may be 
seen by application to an attendant 
528 A Head of ChruL 
129 Madonna and Chad, 
815 Abraham and Hagar, 
698 Mars and Venw in the Net of Vvlean, 

54 Mwn kneeling hefore Wisdom. 
122 Virgin in Glory. 
127 St, Stephen and St. John Baptist. 
153 Portrait of Sansovino, 
989 The Hunt 
1064,1079,1080,1081. SmaU Panels. 



tribnted to 


• 


» • • 


74, 75, 76. An AUnr-piece toiih Wings, 


Ghirlandajo and Granaoci 


88 Madonna and Saints. 


Giordano, Lnca . . . 


441 The Judgment of Paris.--^ijm]axiol^o, 




294 at St. Petersburg. 


Giorgione, attributed to . 


— Two Portraits in one frame. 


Giotto 


1073,1074. SmaUPaneh, 


Granacci, Francesco . . 


97 Madonna and Child, and Saints, 


Greuze . . . . . 


-^ A Head. 


Guido , . . 




« • 


373 Madonna and two Saints. 


Hackaert . . 




• • 


882 Lartdseape.— Figures by Van de Yelde. 


Hals, Frans , 




• • 


766 SmdU PortraU. 


»> » 




» • • 


Ill SmaU Portrait. 


5» 99 




1 • • 


800 Male PortraU. 


»» » « 




• • 


801 Female Portrait. 


»» »» 




» • « 


— Male PortraU. 


Heerschop, H. 




• « 


825 Portrait of a Mow. 


Hobbema, M. 


t • • 


886 SmaU Landscape. 


Holbein. Hans, yo 


nnger. 


586 Portrait of George Cfyzen, 


Honthorst, G. 


• • • 


807 Jacob blessing Isa^ic. 


99 • " 


» • • 


824 The ChneroHty of Soipio. 


Hooghe, Pieter dc 


' • • 


— A Dutch Interior. 


Hnysum, J. van , 


1 • • 


998 Flower-piece. 


Jardin, Karel du . 


1 • • 


— A PortraU. 


Eeyser, Theod. de . . 


750 Family Group. 


Koning, Salom 


ion. 


• • 


821 Portrait 



880 



BERLIN: TSE MUSEUM. 



Konin^, Salomon 
Kulmbade, Hans von 
Lambert Lombard (Sus 

termans) 
Lancret .... 
Le Bran, G. . . . 
Libri, Girolamo dal . 
Lippi, Filippino . . 

»> » • • 

„ attribnted to 

„ Filippo . . 

„ attributed to 
Lorenzetti, Ambrogio 
Lotto, Lorenzo 

>» »» • • 

Lucas van Leiden 

Maas, N 

Mabuse, J. (Gossaert)^ 

attributed to . . / 

Mabuse, J. (Gossaert) . 



>» 



5? 



Mantegna, Andrea . 

attri- 



»» 






buted to ... . 
Master of the ' Death of 

the Virgin ' . . . 

Matsys, Q 

MemliDg, Hans . 
MetsUfG 

»> »» .... 
Mierevelt 



Mignard, P 

Montagna, Bartolommeo 
Moretto 



99 



Mow, Antonio 
Morone, FianceBCo . 



No. 

826 Crcetus and Solon. 

— AdorcUton of the Kings. 

653 Madonna and Child. 
473 Lcmdseape and Figures. 
471 Family Group. — Life size. 

30 Madonna Enthroned and Saints. 

78 Male PoHraU. 

82 Madonna and Child, 

96 Crucifixion. 

69 Madonna and ChUd in a Wood. 

58 Madonna and Child. 
284, 285. Small examples. 
323 St. Sebastian and St. Christopher. 

— Several Portraits. 

— St. Jerome. — Small. 

819 A Philosopher. — Life size. 

640, 642, 646, 648, 661. SuhJecU nea 

life sizCf nude. 
650 Madonna and Child. 
656a. Woman weighing Money. 

27 Madonna and Child. 

29 FresenlaUon in the Temple. 

9 A Head. 

578 Adoration and two Saints. — ^A tripty 
561 Madonna and Child. — Nearly life sii 
528b. Madonna and Child. 
792 A Family Group. 
792a. a Cook. 
748 A Female Portrait. 
465 Femnle Portrait. 
44 Madonna Enthroned with Saints. 
187 Adoration of the Shepherds. 

— Virgin and St. Anne in Ghry, and i 

Saints. 
585a. Ttico Reads. 
46 AMoidouna. 



BERLIN: THE MUSEUM. 



831 



Moroni 



>» 



Murillo 



5» 



J> 



Nason, P. 
Neer, Van der 
Netscher, G. . 
Palamedes 
Palma Yecohlo 



5» 



»» 



Patinir, Joachim 



» 



>» 



Pencz, G. . . 
Perugino . 
Pesne, Antoine 
Pierson 
Pinturiochlo . 



»» 






Pollajnolo. . . 
Pordenone, B. 
Poussin, K. . . . 
Bafiaellino del Garbo 



»» 



Eapliael Sanzio . 



j» 



buted 



No. 

167 Portrait of a Young Man, 

— Three fine Portraits, without numbers. 
408 A Magdalen, 

414 8t, Anthony and Child. 

— Another. 
977 8tiU-life. 

840 A Conflagration, 

848 A Cook in a Kitchen, 

758a. a Fete in a Garden, 

174 PortraiL 

197a« Portrait of one of his Daughters, 

608 A Madonna in a Landscape, 

620 A Landscape, 

582.585,587. Portraits. 

146 Madonna Enthroned with Saints, 
494 TiDo Portraits, 

948,985a. StiU-life. 
102, 149. HisUyry of Tobias, 
132 Adoration of the Magi, 
234 A Portrait. 
237 A Pieta. 

— Portrait of a Man voith Bed Cross on 

his Breast, 
73 An Annunciation, 
196 Woma/n taken in Adultery, 

— A few average examples. 
90 Madonna and Angels, 

98 Madonna Enthroned and Saints, 
150 Adaraiion of the Shepherds. — Early. 

Tempera on linen, much injured. 
247a. Madonna and ChUdy John Baptist, 
and another. — ^Painted 1505. 

141 A Madonna and Child. 
145 A Madonna and Child with St, Joseph 
and a Cardinal, 

147 Madonna and Child with St, John, — 
The tapeatriea mtlaa <sKata.^\kS>&».^«.^ 
after bia desv^aa m^oro.^'^'^^^^^."^'^ 



Piombo, Sebastiano del • 






>» 



>» 



Raphael Sanzio, attri- 
buted to .... 
Raphael Sanzio, attri 



Sanzio, attri-^ 
to ... J 



Raphael Sanzio, attri- 
buted to ... . 



332 



BERLIN: TME mJSBXJM. 



Bavesteyn, Jon van, at- 
tributed to ... . 
Bembrandt van Byn 



5» 

» 
»» 



»» 
»» 
>» 



Bibera, attributed to 



Bing, L. van . 
Bomanino . . 



5» 



»» 



Bosa, Salvator 
Bosselli, Gosimo 



>» 



»» 



Bnbens, P. P. 



» 
»» 

»> 
>» 



Buyj9ch, Bachel 



Baysdael, Jacob 



»» 



»» 



Victors . . 
Sacchi, Fr. 
Sallaert, Antonio 
Banti, Giovanni 
Saasoferrato . 
Savoldo, Girolamo 
Signorelli, Lnoa 






•9 



and 



No. 



507 A Portrait 

802 8am9(m and his FaOier-in-lau},'-lii» 
size. 

805 An InUrior, — Very small. 

806 An Interior, — Very small. 
808, 810. Two Heads. 

828 Bape of Proserpine, — ^Figures small. 

— A Female Portrait, 

416 Martyrdom of 8t, Bartholomew,'^ 

replica of No. 989 at Madrid. 
708 Marriage cUCana — Details of a Kiiehe 
151 Dead Christ, Women, and AposUes, 
155 Madonna Enthroned. 
157 Judith. 
421 Sea daOiing on a Wild Coast, 

59 A Madonna in Glory, 

71 A Dead Christ, 
762 CoroncUion of the Virgin, 
7.63 Bead of a Child, 

779 Group of Children with Fruit 

780 Study for a Madonna and Saints, 
783 The Raising of Lazarus. 

785 Andromeda, 

999 A Flower Piece. — Numerous otb 
flower pieces by Seghers^ Vi 
Huysum, De Heem, and Queliinoa 

893 Cottage and Trees, 

— Bridge and Trees, 

— Domestic Fowls, 
53 Crucifixion, 

702 A View of Antwerp, 
139 Madonna and Saints, 
458 Hoiby Family. 
307 Girl enveloped in a Cloak, 
79 Six SainU, 

— Pan and Music, 

— Holy Family— ^^s^'Q^^^- 



BEELVH: THE MUSEUM. 



838 



Snyders 

Snyders and Rubens 
Solario, A. (Lo Zingaro) . 
Steen, Jan .... 
Teniers, D., the yonuger. 



»» 



Terburg, G. 



*i 



11 



>» 



Tiepolo, 6. B 
Tintoretto 



Titian 



11 



11 
11 
11 11 



attributed to 

11 
Tura, Ooeimo. . 



Valkenborck, Martin van 
Van de Velde, A. 
Velasquez . . . 



Veronese, School of . 



11 



11 



VerroocWo, Andrea . 
Verspronck, Jan . 

Victor, Jan . . . 

Viti, Timoteo . . . 

Viyarini, Anton . . 

M Bart. . 

„ Luigi 4 . 

Vos, Gomelis de . . 



ff 



ff 



No. 

878 Fighting Cocks. • 

774 A Stag-hunt, 

116 St. Jerome. 

797 A Garden Scene. 

858 The Alchemist. 

856 The Trio-trac Players. 

859 TemptationofSt.Anihmy.—Aadoiherg. 
791 The Paternal Counsel.— EeplicA. 

793 The SndOCs Shop. 

— Small fuU-length Portrait. 
454, 459. Two examples. 

300 A Madonna in Glory and two Apostles. 
310 Luna and the Hours. 
316 St. JtforA;.— And a few Portraits. 
161 Portrait of Admiral Mauro. 
163 His own Portrait, when old. 
166 His daughter Lavinia^ holding a dish 
of Fruit. 

— Several Portraits. 

159, 160. Sketches of Amorini. 

170a, 170b. Two ParoWc*.— gmall studies. 

Ill A Virgin and Saints, toith an elaborate 

architectural ha^skground. 
703 The. Building of Babel. 
884a. Landscape. 

— FuU4ength Portrait pf a Spanish 

Admiral. 
303,304,309,311. Fourfine decorative works 
from the Fondaco, Venice. 

— His Panels on the ceiling of the roam 

— Madonna and Child. 
877a. Female Portrait. 
826a. EU and Samtiel. 
120, 124. Two subjects. 

5 Adoration of the Kings. 
1160 St. George and the Dragon, 
38 Madonna Enthroned with Saints. 
881 PortraiU of a Mau audi^ij^. 
832 Portraits of alitOePTVJwcww atsA.TAo.H 
mate* 



»1 »» »9 



» »> » 



S34 BERLIN: THE MUSEUM, 

No. 
VoBy Martin de, attri- 
buted to ... . 709 Jonah cast to the Whale. 
Yos, Simon de . . . 704 Cupid Chagti&ed, 
Watteau, Ant. . . . 468, 470. Small examples. 
Weenix, Jan .... 1001 A Flower Pie^, 
Werff, A. van der . . — A few examples. 
Weyden, Rogiervander. 534a. A Triptych — Deposition, Xaiivity, 

and Beaurrection. 
534b. a THptych—Life of St John the 

Baptist. 
535 A Triptyeh'-The Nativity and the 
Epiphany of the East and West.— 
Each centre and wing has its subject 
complete and full of details. 
Willaertz, Adam . . 71 1 Sea-ehore. 
Witte, Eman. de . . . 904a. Interior of a Synagogue, 

Zeitblom, Bart 561a, 561b. St, Peter and St. Anne, 

„ „ ... 606a« Two Angels with tfie Head oj St. 

Veronica, 
Zurbaran 404a. San Pedro Nolasco in his CeU. 



The SuEBMONDT Collection, at the Royal Museum, Berlin, at present 
(1877) without a catalogue, and numbered separately from the original 
gallery. It was acquired by the (German Government in 1874. 

No. 

Bellotti, B 187 DueaZ Palace, Venice. 

Bol, F 65 Female Portrait. 

Boucher, Fr 189 Venus and Cupid. 

Brekelenkamp ... 81 SttU-life, 

Brouwer, A — A few examples. 

Oapelle, Jan van do. . . — Boais on a Smooth Sea, 

Cuyp, A 48 Biver Scene and Cows. — Small. 

Diirer, A., attributed to. 1 A Head, 

„ „ . . 8 His own Likeness, — An excellent re- 
plica of the well-known original. 

Djck, Anton van ... — Some small studies in brown. 

JEyck, Jan van ... 1 A Head. — AAmo%t life aine, 

„ ,, ... 2 FirginttndCliild,,TTe«»a'nAaYou-u\«A».. 

JRZLocfc. a .... 66 i'emale Porfcratt. 



BERLIN: THE MUSEUMS, 



S35 





No. 


fyt, Jan 


164 De<n1, Game, 


?» >» 


967 Dead Game. 


Goyen, Jan van . 


42 Landscape. — Large. 


Hals, Frans .... 


16 Nurse and Child. 


?i »» .... 


17 Female PortraU. 


»» >» .... 


18 8maU Portrait. 


» 5» .... 


19 B<yy with Music. 


.4 5> .... 


20 Boy Smoking and Dnnhlng. 


?» . 1» .... 


21 Woman Laughing, with aw Owl. 


Hals, Frans, the youngei 


r 56 StaUUfe. 


Heem, J. de . 


125 FruU, 


Holbein, Hans 


10 A PoHrait 


„ attributed to 


11 A Portrait 


Hondecoeter .... 


115 Pelican and Poultry. 


Huysnm, J. van . 


127, 128. Flower-pieces. 


Keyser, Th.de . . , 


24 Life-size Portrait. 


j» ?» • • 


25 Life-size Portrait, 


» >» • • 


26 Two side wings of a centre missing — 




Donaiors. 


Maratta, Carlo . . . 


182 Male Portrait. 


Matsye, Q. . . . 


— A Cardinal Beading. 


Meer, Jan van der, of 


1 68 A Courtyard with a Boy blovfing 


Delft . . . . / Bubbles. 


,« .... 


69 Cottage with Trees and Figures. 


»» .... 


70 CHrl dressing before a Glass. 


Metsu, G 


77 Female Portrait. — Life size. 


Neer, A. van der 


93 Moonlight Effect. 


>» j^ • • 


96 Confktgration, 


Potter, Panl . . . 


— In a Wood with Hunters and Hounds, 


Potter, Pieter. . . . 


58 StUl'life, 


Ravesteyn, Jan van . 


— Male Portrait. 


Rembrandt van Ryn 


60 PoHrait, 


>» «» 


62 Landscape — Ruth and Boaz. 


Kibera .... 


174 ul Martyrdom. 


Rubens, P. P. . . 


129 Study of a Head. — And some small 




sketches. 


Ruysdael, Jacob . 


86 A Distant Town, 


»> »^ • • 


89 A Landscape. 


f9 ff m . , 


90 lAqU and SKode ojt B^a. 



3S6 



CA88EL: THE GALLBBY. 



Snydere . . 

»» 
Steen, Jan 

»> »» 
Tenters, D., younger . 



• • 



Terbnrg, G. 



»» 



»» 



>» 



Velasquez, attributed to 
Velde, A. van de. . 
Watteau, Ant. 



No. 

161 Fruit. 

162 Studies of dogs^ heads. 

78 A Drinking Quarrel. 

79 A Group. 

— Music and Dancing outside a FtZZoj 

Inn. 
71, 72. A Pair of small Portraits, 

73 A Portrait. 

74 The Smoker. 

75 The Doctor. 

167 Female Portrait.— Full length. 

— Lwndsoa'pe and Horses. 
188 Smalt Sylvan Scene. 



THE GALLERY AT OASSEL. 
Catalogite without Date. 



Baokhuizen, Ludolf 
Bega, Cornells . 
Bourdon, S^bastien 
Brouwer, A. . 



n 



»» 



Granach, Lucas, elder 
Dolci, Carlo . . 
Diirer, Albrecht . 

Dvck, Anton van 



»» 



>» 



»J 



»> 



J» 



j» 



Hals, Frans 



>9 



99 



99 



99 



Heyden, Jan van der 



Pictures examined in 1873. 

No. 

. 556 A Storm at Sea, 

. 463 The Chemist. 

. 456 A Genre Scene. 

. 380 Peasants playing Cards. 

. 381 Pea,sants. 

. . 882 A Man eating a Herring. 

9 The Woman taken in Adultery, 
450 St. CeeUia. 
6 Portrait of a Man holding a Wreath 
Bases. 
290 Portraits of Snyders and his Wife. 

294 Portrait of a Burgomaster of Antwerp 

295 Portrait of a Man and Woman. 
300 Portrait of an Ecclesiastic in black. 

222 A Laughing Peasant. 

223 Ttoo Boys Singing. 
226 Male Portrait. — Asid otbers. 

. 582 Vi«MJ in Brua^eU. 



CA88EL: THE GALLERY. 



837 





No. 


Holbein, Hans, younger. 49 MarCs Portrait. 


Jordaens, Jacob . . 


. 266 From a Fable of Mwp. 


Mabuse, Jan GoR8aert 


. 58 A Triptych. 


Metsu, G. ... 


. 448 A Lady playing the Zither. 


Mieris, Frann van, 




younger . . . 


. 787 The Baker. 


Netseher, G. . . . 


. 586 Portrait of a Lady. 


„ ... 


. 587 Portrait of a Young Lady. 


Ostade, Adrian van . 


. 400 A Party of Peasants. 


Potter, Paul . . . 


. 526 Four Cows in a Landscape. 


»» »» • • • 


. 527 A large Painting of Cattle. 


Raphael (Sanziu) 


. 29 Holy Family. 


Rembrandt , . . 


. 347 A Young Girl with a Pink. 


» ... 


. 348 Portrait host of a Man. 


»» ... 


. 350 Portrait of an Old Man seated. 


» ... 


. 351 Portrait of O^e Poet Erdl 


»» ... 


. 352 Portrait of a Man. 


>» ... 


. 353 A Landscape. 


» ... 


. 354 A Mocky Landscape. 


>» ... 


. 356 Portrait of a Young Woman. Perhaps 




his Wife. 


»> ... 


. 357 Portrait cf a Man. 


» ... 


. 358 Portrait of Kopmol. 


» • , . 


. 359 Portrait of Nioolaus Bruynink. 


>» ... 


. 360 His own P&rtraii. 


»> ... 


. 364 Portrait of Burgomaster Six (?). 


»» ... 


. 867 Jaecib hlessing Ephraim and Manasseh. 


»» ... 


. 370 A Man in Armour. 


»> ... 


. 371 A Dutchman. — Life-size. 


»> ... 


. 372 A Landscape. 


Ribera, Jos^ . . . 


. 263 Mater Dolorosa. 


Rubens, P. P. . . 


. 176 Flight into Egypt. 


>» • • 


. 187 Holy Family and Saints. 


Ruysdael .... 


, 567 Landscape. 


Sassoferrato . . . 


. 343 Madonna and Sleeping Child. 


Snyders, Frans . . 


. 198 A Study of StiU-life. 


Steen, Jan . . . 


. 576 The Bean-feast. 


Teniers, D., younger 


. 404 The Bathroom. 


Terburg, G. . . . 


. 384 I<ady. plaining oaUie LuU. 



338 



COLOGNE: THE MUSEUM, 



Terburg, G 

Tiziano (Vecellio) . . 

bated to ... / 
Yelde, Adrian van de . 
Willem 



»> 
>» 



»> 



Veronese, P. (Galiari) 
Wouwerman, P. 



>» 



Mo. 
385 The Lesson, 

25 Portrait of the Marquis de Vasto. 

21 A copy not hy him of the Lavinia at 
Dresden, 
593 Near Scheveningen. 

390 Marine Piece, 

391 Marine Piece. 

89 Seipio Africanus ai Carthage, 
465 Going to the Hunt, 
478 The Hay-harvest, 



THE MUSEUM WALLEAF-BICHABTZ AT COLOGNE. 

GatalogijE of 1875. 



The Cologne Sckoci, 



Loobner, or Loethener, 
Stepban . . . . 



»» 



. . 



. . • 



No. 



118 The Virgin of the Bosary, 

119 8L Ambrose and others. 

120 8t, Mark and others. — ^A similar panel 

to tbese is in onr National Gkillery, 
No. 765 ; and tbe centre portion is 
in the Darmstadt Gallery. 



»f 



attributed 



to 



Meister Wilbelm von^ 
Koln . . . . / 



» 



121 
40 

41 

(207 



Master of the 'Death of 
the Virgin* . . . 



Master of tbe Lyvers- 
berg ' Passion * . . 



< 



Hie Last Judgment. — A triptych. 

Virgin and Child and ttco Saints, — A 
triptych. 

Christ on the Cross, with Virgin and eight 
Apostles, 

The BeaXh of the Virgin, — Being the 
work from which this unknown 
painter takes his title. On the two 
wings are Donators and Patron- 
Saints. 

A series of eight scenes illustrating the 
PoMtcm of Jesus Christ, &om which 
this unknown painter takes his title. 



COLOGNE AND DAEM8TADT. 



339 





No. 


Master of the Lyvers- 




berg ' Passion * . . 


. 151 The Last Supper. 


»» 




152 !Z%e Betrayed, 


?> • 




153 0/iri8< &6/are PiZaea. 


»» 




154 i/'^e Crowning and Mocking of Christ. 


5» < 




155 Christ hearing the Cross. 


J> • 




156 The Crucifixion. 


y> 




157 2%e Descent and Entombment 


»» 




158 7%e Resurrection. 


Unknown Master 


> 


. 159 ^ Depo8t7«on.— Painted 1480. 


»> »9 


• 


. 160, 161. The Wings. 


» »» 




199 The Marriage of St. Catharine.— A 
triptych. 



There are also a few remains of the frescoes which were originally 
painted for the Rathhaus by Wilhebn von Koln, now preserved in a 
room below the ground floor. 

There is a large eoUeotion of third-rate pictures on the first floor, 

chiefly Flemish and Dutch, among which may first be noted the 

following: 

No. 

654a. Male Portrait, 

. 633 Prometheus. 

. 611,612,613. PortraUs. 

617 St. Francis receiving the Stigmata. 

. 618 A Holy Family. 

810 A small study or copy of the great 

altar-piece of the Pesaro family in 

the Church of S. M. dei Prari at 

Venice. 

. 624 MaU Portrait. 



Fabritius, Carl 
Jordaens, Jacob 
Moreelse, Paul 
Rubens, P. P. 



» 



Titian, attributed to 



Van Dyok, Anton 



THE PICTURE GALLERY AT DARMSTADT. 

Catalogue op 1875. 

The chief source of interest in this Gallery, as in that of Cologne, is 
the collection of numerous excellent examples of early German masters, 
few of whom can be identified with certainty, although the dates of 

•Li 



340 



DARMSTADT, 



the works themselves are known. After the best of these have been 
noted, a few of the other pictures, chiefly Butch and Flemish, which 
have any merit are named. The large remainder of nearly 700 piotnzes 
here will not repay the visitor's attention. 



Brnyn, BarthdonuLus > 

„ In his manner . 

Cologne, AncientSchool \ 

of / 

Cologne, School of, under 

Flemish influence . . 



»» 



Cranaoh, Lucas, elder . 



»♦ 



>» 



»♦ 



»» 



v^ 



Johann Lucas. 
Holbein,, Hans, younger. 
Leiden, Lucas van . . 
Lochner, Stephan, or 
Loethener .... 
Memling, School of . . 



Patlnir, Joaohitti die . 

Bhenish Middle School, 
about year 1500 

Bhenish Middle School, 
with the influence of 
the School of Colmar 

Bhenish Lower School 

>» » »» 

>» » » 

»» » >> 



»» 



» 



>» 



)} 



» 



9» 



Schongauer, Martin . 



No. 

198 Female Portrait 

200 Christ on the Cross. 

167 AUar-pieoe wil^ Wings, — From the 

Church of Ortenberg. 

186 8t. Bruno and his FdOoujers, 

187 St. Bruno and his Followers with thi 

Sennit, 
244 Portrait of Cardinal Albrecht wm Bran- 
denburg in his Boom, 

248 Female Por^ait 

249 Virgin and Child under an Apple^ree. 
251 Portrait of Frederick III, of Saxony. 
226 Portrait of a Young Man. 

191 Madonna and Child. 

168 The Presentation in the Temple. 

189 The Madonna and Child,— CloBbly ap- 
proaching in quality to the master, 
and has been attributed to Gterhaid 
Horebout. 

193 Madonna and Child in a Landscape. 

211-215. A fine Altar-pieee. 



216 An Altar-piece, 
175 Christ on the Cross. 

182 Three Panels in onefrcme. 
185 Death of the Virgin. 

196 Female Portrait. 

197 Male Portrait. 

209 Votive Picture, — ^And others. 

217 The Scourging of Christ. 



DARMSTADT AND DRESDEN, 



341 



No. 
Schongauer, Martin . . 218 Dead Christ with Mourners, — And 

others. 
Wilhelm von Koln . . 160 Votive Pictitre in five parts, 
Wohlgemuth, M., School 229 Two wings of an AUar-piece in one 

of / frame. 

Zeitblom, Bart. . . . 223 St. Lawrence, 



Bellotti, Bernardo . 
Brueghel, Pieter, elder . 
Canale, Antonio . . ^ 
Garacci, Annibale . , 
Eeckhout, G. van den . 
Gyssels, Pieter . . . 

Heda, W. 

Keyser, Thos. de . . 
Neer, A. van der . . 
Ostade, A. van . . . 
Potter, Paul, attributed 

to 

Bembrandt . . . . 



»> 



Bubens, P. P, 
Santvort 

Schalken, Godfried 
Titian, attributed to . 



631 Venetian Scene. — ^And others. 

■271 Landscape, 

619 Venetian Scene. 

541 Portrait of Domenichino, 

386, 387. PoHraiU, 

390 Dead Game, 

321 StiUrlife, 

356,357. PortraiU, 

383 Moonlight, 

362 Peasants Dancing, 

395 LUerior of Stable, 

347 Mocking of Christ, 

348 Female Portrait, — A good copy. 
296 Diana and her Nymphs, 

350a. Portrait of a Girl. 
424 PortraU of WiUiam IIL 
519 Portrait. — ^Probably a good work by 
Tintoretto. 



THE ROYAL GALLEBY AT DEESDEN. 
Catalogue -of 1872. 

The following catalogue relates to the fine colledCion occupying the 
first floor of this gallery, and notes the numbers of the large series 
of views by Bernardo Bellotti, as well as the copies and other works 
by Dietrich which are placed on the ground floor. There also is a 
large series of works in pastel by various artists, and a collection of 
miniatures. 



342 



DRESDEN: THE GALLERY, 



Furthermore a large number of canvases is to be found on tbie 
upper story, very few of which are worth seeing, a great proportion 
being inferior copies or school work wholly unworthy of' the well- 
Icnown names attached to the frames. 



No. 



Abate, Niccolb dell' . 169 MaHyrdom of SairUs. 


Aelst, W. van 


. . . 1186 Fish, &G. 


Albani, F. . 


. . . 494 Cupids Daneing^ ike. 


»» • 


495 Diana and Nymphs, 


♦» 


. . . 496 Galatea and Cupids, 


>» 


. . . 497 Venus and VuUsan. 


»y • 


. 500 Creation of Eve. 


*y 


. . . 502 Flight into Egypt. 


Antonello da Mes 


sina . 2382 Si. Sebastian. 


Bagnacayallo(Eamenghi) 84 Virgin and Child in Glory with Saints. 


Barocoi, F. . 


. . . 85 Hcufar in the Desert, 


>» 


. . . 87 Virgin^ Child, and two Saints. 


Bassano, Leandro 


. . 285 Male Portrait. 


Battoni, P. G. 


. . . 129 Repentant Magdalen, 


Bellini, Giovanni 


. . 210 Bust of LoredanOf Doge of Venice, 


♦♦ »> 


attri- 


buted to . . 


. . 2387 Hdy Family,— By Previtale : 0. and 0. 


Berchem,. N. 


. . . 1404 Angels appearing to the Shepherds. 


»» 


. 1405-1407. Landscapes.— And others. 


Berckkeyden, J. 


. . 2366 Interior of Cathedral at Haarlem, 


Bigio, Francia , 


. . . 41 Bathsheba. 


Bol, Ferdinand . 


. , 1266 Repose in Egypt. 


»» »» 


, . . 1267 Jacob's Dream, 


»» »» ' 


, . . 126S Joseph introduces his Father to Pharaoh. 


Bcmoonsiglio . 


. , 212 Madonna and Saints, 


Bonifazio . . . 


. , 261 Finding of Moses. 


>♦ • • 


. . . 262 Virgin, Child, and Saints. 


Bordone, Paris . 


256 Diana and a Nymph. 


Both, Jan 


. . . 1272 LandsccBpe. 


Botticelli, Sandro 


, . 26a Miracle of St. Zendbius, 


Bril, Matthew 


. . . Ill Landscape, 


M »> " 


, , , 778 Landscape. 


„ Paul . . 


. . 784 Tobias and the Angel. 


^ruoghel, Jm ( Ve 


ilours). 730 LandscaTpe, 



DRESDEN: THE GALLEBY. 343 

No. 
Brueghel, Jan (Velours). 735 Landscape, 

„ „ „ . 738 Carriages and Horsemen before an Inn^ 

„ „ „ . 745 Landscape wiHh Figures, 

„ „ „ . 756 Siege of a Fortress. 

„ „ „ . 2363 AdoraHon of the 3fagt.-rAnd many 

other good examples. 

Bruyn, B 2418 Descent from the Cross, 

Borgkmair, Hans . 1739 Death of St Ursula. — ^Altar-piece with 

two wings. 

Calvaert, D 69 Copy of Baphael's St. Cecilia. 

Oanaletto (Bernardo 

Bellotti) .... 2325-2842. Views of Dresden. 
„ .... 2343-2353. Views of Pima. 

Cano, Alonso .... 631 Apostle St. Paul, 

Cantarini 525 Joseph and Potiphar's Wife. 

Garacci, Annlbale . 449 The Genius of Glory. 

„ „ . . 450 Assumption of the Virgin. 

„ „ . . 451 Virgin and Child Enthroned vfith Saints. 

„ „ . . 452 St. Boch distributing Ahns, 

Caravaggio (Amerighi) . 175 St. Sebastian, 
„ „ . 176 Cardrplayers. 

„ „ 177 Guard phxying Cards. 

„ „ 178 Fortune-teiUing, 

Carducho, V 606 Three Saints, 

Catena, V 211 Virgin and Child with Saints, 

Oavazzola (Moi-ando, P.) 2411 Female Portrait, 
Ceulen, 0. J, van . . 1212, 1213. PoHraits, 
Cignani, Garlo . . . 528 Joseph'and Potiphar's Wife, 
Cima da Conegliano . . 215 Figure of Christ, 

„ „ . . 2\Q Presentation of Mary in the Temple, 

Glouet, Fran9ois . . 2420 Female Portrait. 

Ck)rreggio 151 The Virgin and Child enthroned with 

four Saints, 

„ 152 Virgin and Child in Glory with three 

Saints, 

„ 153 Repentant Magdalen, 

„ 15^ Adoration of Vie Shepherds, ^^ La Notte.*' 

„ 155 Virgin and dhild eniiWornA^ msaXXs. ^^srarc 

8ainU, 



344 



DBE8DEN: THE GALLERY. 



Correprgio 

Oranach, Luoas, elder . 



Gredi, L. di . 

»> • 

Chiyp, A. . . 



>» 



Denner, Balthasar 
Dietrich, Christian 
Dolci, Carlo . . 



» 
>» 






Domenichino . . 
Dossi, Dosso . . 
Dow, G. . . . 
Dughet,Ga8par(Pous8in) 



» 



ii 



» 



Diirer, A. . 



» 



» 



• • 



DiiRart, Comelis 


» 
Dyck, 


Anton van 


»» 


»» 


» 


» 


>» 


» 


» 


»« 


>» 


»» 


»> 


>♦ 


»> 


M 


Eyck, 


>» 

Jan van 



Fabriano, Gentile da 

I^eti, Domenico . . 

Fliack, Govert . . 



No. 

156 Hie Doctor of Correggio. 

— Nnmerona works are attributed to this 

master, many of which are yery in- 
ferior and need not be noted. 

2385 Madonna adoring Child. 

2386 Virgin and 8aint». — And others. 
2355 Hunting Scene, 

2427 PoHrait 

— Several Portraits. 
2257-2309A.->yarious examples. 

61 Herodias loiih Head of St. John th» 

JBaptifft. 

62 St. Cecilia playing upon an Organ. 

63 Our Saviour blessing the Bread aid 

Wine. 

482 Charity. 

135 Fathers of the Church. 
1134-1149 inclusive. — Various examples. 

656a Landscape near Borne. 

657-659. Landscapes. 
1722a Christ on the Cross. 
1723 Christ hearing the Cross. 
1725 Portrait of Bemhard de Kessen. 

1671 Genre Piece. 

1672 Genre Piece. 
982 St. Jerome. 

985 Portrait of Charles J. of England. 

986 Portrait of Henrietta Marian his Queen. 

987 Portrait Group of their three Children. 

988 Portrait of a Man in Black. 

990 Portrait of the painter Martin Byckaert. 

991 Portrait. 

992 Portrait of a Man in Armour, 
994-998. PoHraits. 

1713 Triptych — Madonna and Child with 

Saints. 
2383 Madonna and ChUd Enthroned. 

94 David and Goliath. — And others. 
1313a. David aud TJfiahi. 



DRESDEN: THE GALLERY. 



345 





No. 


IFlinck, G overt . 


. . 1314 PoHrait, 


» » 


. . 1316 PoHrait 


IPranceschiiii, M. A. 


, . 530 MagdcUen and Woman, 


Prancia, Francesco , 


. 485 A PredeUa, 


>» » 


. 436 Virgin and Child and 8t John. 


»» »> 


. . 437 Baptim. of Christ 


Fyt, Jan . , . 


. . 1032 Live Game a/nd StiU-life. 


» »> ... 


. . 1033 Dead' Game. 


»» »» ... 


. . 2379 Dog, 


Garofalo (Tiflio) . 


, . 140 Mar%f FentM, and Cupid, 


>» »» 


, 141 Neptune and Pallas, 


>» » • 


, 142 Marriage of Ba^ichus and Ariadne, 


»» >» . • 


, 145 Virgin adoring Infant Christ, 


>» »» 


, . 146 Virgin and Child appearing to Saints. 


Ghlrlandajo, D. . 


. . 29 The Nativity, 


Giordano, Luca . , 


. 568 RercuUs and Omphalos, 


»> »» • 


569 Perseus and the Head of Medusa, 


»> »» • 


. , 572 Lucretia and Targuinius, 


>> »> 


, , 575 The Bejeetion of Hagar, 


Giorgione, attributed 


to. 218 Ja^idb saluting Ba^ehel, 


»> >♦ 


, 219 Adoration of the Shepherds, 


»» »» 


, 220 Man and Woman, 


>» »» 


221 Supposed Portrait of Aretino, 


» » 


. 2389 Subject from * Orlando Furioso.' 


Goyen, Jan van . 


. 1131 Skaters on the Ice, — And others. 


Grandi, Ercole . . 


. 148 Christ on the way to Calvary. 


>♦ >♦ • ' 


. 149 The Betrayal. 


Greuze, J. B. . . . 


. . 2377 A Family Group, 


Gnercino . , . . 


, 506 Venus finding the Body of Adonis, 


♦> . . . , 


. 508 Venus finding the Body of Adonis. 


» . . . . 


. 509 Cephale weeping over the Body of 




Procris, 


» ... 


. 510 Diana, 


>» ... 


. . 511 Queen Semiromis. 


» ... 


. , 512 The Wounded Donnda, 


Hals, Frans . . 


. , 938-940. PoHraits, 


» >» . . . 


. 2368 Fish-seOers. 


»> >» • • 


. . 2425 Portrait. 


Beda, W.O.. . . 


. 2426 SHVAife. 



346 



DBE8DEN: THE GALLERY. 





No. 


Ueem, Johnnn David de 1156 SHU-life, 


» »» »> 


1159 Still-life. 


»» »» »» 


1161 StaUife. 


»j »» »» 


1164 Flowers in a Vase. 


„ Jan de (son) . 


. . 1165 StUUife. 


„ Comelis (son] 


. 1166 StiU-life. 


»» >» 


. 1167 8tia-Ufe. 


Heist, B. van der 


, . 2430 Female Portrait. 


Hejden, J. van der 


. . 1512 View in a Town. 


Uobbema, M. 


. . 2375 Landscajpe. 


»> 


. . 2435 Landscape. 


Holbein, Hans, younger. 1809 The Burgomaster Meyer and Family 




Donators — the Virgin and Child. 


»» »» ♦> 


. 1810 Portrait of Morett, jeweller to Hen 




VIIL of England. 


Hondeooeter . . 


. . 1480 Potdtry. 


>» 


. . 1481 Poultry. 


Honthorst, G. van 


. . 1122 The Dentist. 


Huysum, J. van . . 


, . 1704 Flowers. 


Jordaens, Jacob . , 


. . 954 Ariadne with Fauns, Satyrs, &e. 


»» »> • 


. . 959 Presentation in the Temple. 


»» »» • 


. . 961 Satyr and Nymph. 


Juanes, Jnan de . 


. . 602 Death of the Virgin. 


Kalf, Willem ' . . 


. 1454 StiUrlife. 


ILanfmann, Angelica 


. 1978 A Young Sibyl. 


>» »» 


. 1979 A Young Vestal. 


»» »> 


. 1980 Ariadne abandoned by Theseus. 


Lancret, Nicolas . . 


. 696 A Pastoral Dance. 


»» »> • ' 


, . 697 A Pastoral Dance. 


>» » • ■ 


. 698 A Pastoral Dance. 


Lanfranoo . . , 


. 182 St. Peter Repentant. 


Lippi, Filippino . 


. . 85 Virgin and Child. 


Lorraine, Glaude 


. 654 Flight into Egypt. 


♦> » • 


. 655 Landscape, &c. 


Maas, N 


. 2372 Two Women in a Kitchen. 


Maratta, Garlo 


. 118 Virgin and Child.— And others. 


MatsjB, Quintin . . 


. 1721 A Banker and Clients. 


Meer of Delft, Jan i 


ran 


der 


. 1432 Grcmpof fouT¥iguTe%.--\i&^«flfc. 



DRESDEN: THE GALLERY, 



347 



iMeer of Delft, Jan van'^ 

der / 

iMLemling, H. 
ISdetsu, G. 






l^eulen, J. van der 

Mieievelt, P. 

>» • 

Miens, Frans van 



>» 



Willem van . . 



Mignon, A. 






Morales (El Divino) 
Moreelse, P. . 
Moretto (Bonyicino) 
M(»o, Antonio 



» 



n 



Moroni, G. B. 
Murillo, Esteban 



>» 



Neefs, Pieter 
Netscher, G. 






>» 



»» 



»> 



OAey, B. van 



No. 
1433 A Young Oirl reading at an Open 

Window, 
2417 8t, Christopher cmd Infant Christ, 

1305 Man and Woman in an Inn, • 

1306 Man selling a Fowl, 
1308 Woman and Game-dealer, 

1311 Young Woman reading a Letter. — And 
others. 

1044 CouH of Louis XIV, 

1045 Court of Louis XIV, 

1098 Male FoHraU. 

1099 FemaU Portrait, 

1465-1479. — Several good, especially Nos. 

1471, 1474, 1475, 1476. 
1650^1661. — Several good, especially Nos. 

1650, 1661. 
1492, 1493. Flowers and FruiU, 

1496 Flowers cmd Fruits, 

1497 FruiU and Birds, 
1502 Game and Fruit. 

1505 Dead Ckvme, — And others. 

601 Ecce Homo, 
2424 Male PoHrait. 

254a Appearance of the Virgin. 
1085 PoHrait, 
1085a PoHrait, 

267 Male PoHrait. 

633 The Apotheosis of San Rodrigue, 

6»i Virgin and Child. 
1049 Interior of a Church, 
1527 A Lady and Gentleman at a Harpsi- 
chord, 

1529 Doctor and Patient. 

1530 A Gentleman accompanying a Lady on 

the Guitar, 

1531 Portrait of Madame de Montespan, 

1532 The same playing the Harp, 

1533 Lady and Dog, 
2421 Holy Fam{lt|. 



348 



DRESDEN: THE GALLEBT. 



Ostade, A. Tan . 



»> 



>» 



Padovanino, H . . . 
Palma, Jacopo (Yeochio) 

»» »» » 

»» »> >» 

>» » >» 



»> 



»> 



» 



Pannegianino 



» 



Pater, J. B. 



>» 



Piombo, S. del . . . 
Ponte, Francesco da^ 
(Bassano) . . . / 



»> 



Fordenone, Bernardino . 
Pordenone, G. A. . . 
Pottenburg, C. . . . 
Potter, Paul .... 



Ponssin, Nicolas . 
Procaccini, Gamillo 

„ Gr. C. . . 

n • < 

Baphael (Sanzio) 
Bavesteyn, Jan van, 
attributed to . . . 
Bembrandt van Bya 



>» 
»> 
»» 
»> 
» 
» 



>» 

M 
»» 
»> 
>» 
>» 



No. 

1283 Interior with Peasants, 
1287 Znienor with Peasants, 

340 Ju<2t<^ irt^A the Head of Hctof ernes. 

242 A Holy Family, 

243 !r^ Three Sisters, 

244 u4 Venus in Landscape, 

245 Ftr^'n and Child ; the Baptist and St. 

Catharine, 

246 Madonna and Child with Saints, 

162 Virgin and Child enthroned vjiih two 

Saints. 
164 Virgin and Child, *' deUa Bosa?* 

699 The Dancers. 

700 The Dancers, 

2390 C%rt8i with the Cross, 

276 Christ driving out the Buyers in ^ 

Temple, 

277 The Adoration of the Shepherds, 
254 Portrait of a Venetian Lady, 
252 Lady in Mournirtg. 

2429 Stimife. 

1420 Forest and Hunters. — An inferior repe- 
tition of one in the Suermondt at 
Berlin. 
648 Venus and Cupid, 

442 St, Booh heaUng the Diseased, 

443 Figures in a Boat, 

444 Holy Family, 

67 The " Madonna dd San Sisto,'* 

1106 MaU Portrait. 

1214 Bust of a Young Woman, 

1216 Ganymede carried off by the Eagle. 

1217 Samson and others Feasting, 

1219 Portrait of his Wife. 

1220 MAnoe and his Wife sa^crificing to God. 
1223 Portrait of an Old Man. 

1225 Portrait of Himself, with his Wife on 
his Knees, 



DRESDEN: THE GALLEBT. 



349 





No. 


tembrandt van Byn 


. 1228 Por«rat« of an Old Man. 


>» >» 


. 1232 Landscape. 


;eiii, Guido . . . 


. 470 FenfM and Cupid. 


>i »» • • • 


. 472 ^tntt8 and Semiramis. 


»> »» • • • 


. 473 Ftr^'w adoring Infant. 


»> J* • • • 


. 474 C%rt8< eroumed with Thorns and hold- 




ing a Beed. 


» »» • • • 


« 476 The Bisen Saviour appearing to His 




Mother and others. 


>» »> • • • 


. 478 Virgin and Child enthroned with Saints. 


»> >» • • • 


. 479 Christ crowned with Thorns. — Oval. 


kibera (Lo Spagnoletto) . 608 St. Mary of Egypt and an Angel. 


» y> 


. 610 An Angel appearing to St. Francis of 




Assisi. 


»» ♦» 


. 612 Martyrdom of St. Lawrence. 


>» >» 


. 613 .St. Paul the Hermit. 


»> »> 


. 615 St. Paid the Hermit, 


»> »» 


. 618 Diogenes with his Lantern. 


»» >» 


. 619 Philosopher in Meditation. — And others. 


Ugaud, Hyacinthe . 


. 676 Augustus IILy King of Poland. 


ling, P. de . -. . 


. 1170 JFrmV, &c. 


tomano, Giulio . 


• 


, 82 Holy FamUy, " deUa Catina.'* 


iosa, Salvator 


• 


, 2413 Landscape,' 


» » 


• 


. 2414 Landscape. 


inbens, P. P. 


• 


. 825 Diana and her Nymphs. 


>♦ 


1 


. 829 Mythological Subject. 


y* * 


« 


. 830 St. Jercme. 


» • 


> 4 


. 831 SaJxme and the Head of John the 
Baptist. 


» 


» 4 


. 832 Old Woman and Boys. 


»> 


» 1 


, . 834 Tigress and Lion, 


» • 


» 4 


. 835 Satyrs. 


» 




. . 836 View of the Escurial, Spain. 


» 




, . 837 Boar-hunt, 


» 




. . 838 Judgment of Parts.— Small. 


» 




. . 889 !Z%e Garden of Love. 


»9 




. • 840 Mercury and Argus.— Small. 


n 




. . B^ Study for the * Last Judgment ai 
Munich. 



850 



DRESDEN: THE GALLEBY, 



Rubens, P. P. 



»> • 

>» • 

>» • 

5> • 

♦» • 

>♦ • 

Buysdael, Jacob . 
»» >» • 

» » • 

»» »» • 

>♦ » • 

Ryckaert, David . 



>♦ 



>» 



»» 



»» 



Sarto, Andrea del (Y 
nncchi) . . . 



♦♦ 



» 



an- 



Scbalken, G. 



w 



* • 



Signorelli, Luca . 
Slingeland, Pieter van . 



»» 



» 



99 



»» 



Snyders, Frans . 



• • 



»> » 



Steen, Jan .... 



»» » 



» » 



• • • 



Strozzif B. 



99 



• • • • 



No. 

845 "Hm two 8<m8f Albert and Nicholoi- 

846 Female Portrait. 

847 Male PoHrait 

848 Portrait of a Lady and her Child. 

849 Portrait of a Man. 

852 Portrait of Helena FourmenU 

853 Portrait of his last Wife, 

1436 Landscape^ < The Hunt* 

1437 Landscape^ * Cemetery of the Jetci.' 
1439 Xandscajpe. 

1443 Landscape, ' TTie Monastery.* 

1447 Fteti^o/aCbs^Ze. 

2365 i^ncZscape. — And others. 

1016 Peasants, 

1017 Peasants. 
1019 SttO-Ufe. 

43 JlfarrtagF6 o/ iSf . C^^^Wne. 

44 Sacrifice of Iscuic. — This is the origin 

or a fine repetition : another exists 
Madrid, No. 387. • 
113 Madonna and ChiM with Cherubs 
And others. 

1565 Young Girl with a Light. 

1566 Ycung CHrl vrith a Light 
21 Holy Family. 

1537 The Interrupted Lesson. 

1538 Genre Piece, 

1539 Genre Piece, 
887 Dead Game, &c, 

889 Dead Game and Animals. 

891 Boar-hunt — Figures by Rubens. 

892 Game in a Kitchen and Coohs — A 

others. 

1463 The Marriage at Cana. 

1464 A Workan feeding her Child. 
2432 Abraham and Hagar. 

548 David aud B<iihsheba„ 

549 Dawd and GoliatK, 



DRESDEN: THE GALLEBT. 351 



>» 
»» 



No. 
Subleyras, P. . . . 701 Christ in the Home of Simon. 
Teniers, David, elder . 907-913. — ^Various examples. 
"Teniers, David, younger. 915 Flemish Kermess, 

„ „ „ . 919 Peasants round a Table. 

„ „ „ 923 Peasants round a Table. 

„ „ „ . 926 Peasants in a ViUage Inn. 

„ „ „ . 928 The Alchemist. 

„ „ „ . 929 Temptation of St. Anthony. 

. 931 A ViUage Fete. 
„ „ „ . 934 A Dentist. 

Terburg, G 1242 Ttoo Soldiers. — An interior. 

„ .... 1243 Ttoo Female Figures.— An interior. 

. . . 1244 The Lesson on the Lute. 
. . . 124:5 A Study for the * Pai^mal Counsel.* 
Tiarini, Alessandro . . 489 Medor and Angelica. 
Tintoretto .... 287 Virgin and Child enthroned with Saints. 
.... 288 Tujo PoHraits. 

. . 289 Knight and ttoo Women. 
. . . . 290 The Fallen Angels. 

. , 293 The Woman taken in AdvUery. 

Titian 222 The Tribute^mney—^ II Crista della 

Moneta.* 

223 Virgin and ChUd toith Saints. 

224 Holy Family and Donators. 

225 Venus reclining toith Cupid, and a 

Young Man playing the Lute. 

226 Portrait of a Young Woman. 

227 Portrait of a Lady in BUuik. 

228 Portrait. 

. 229 Portrait of a Fair Woman in White. 

230 Portrait of Lavinia, his Daughter. 

Turchi, Alessandro . . 336 Venus and Adonis. — And others. 
Valdes Leal, J. de . . 636 Miracle of a Saint. 
Velasquez de Silva . 624 Portrait of a Man in Black. 

„ attributed to 622, 623. Portraits.— Piohohly copies. 

Velde, Adrian van de . 1521 A Woman Drinking. 
„ „ . 1522 Landscape. 

. 1523 Buins. 
„ „ „ . 1524 SkaJting. 






>» 
>» 
>» 

n 

>» 
»♦ 



852 



DRESDEN: THE GALLEBT, 



Velde, Adrian van de . 

„ Willem van de . 

Vernet, C. J. 

Veronese, Paolo 



» 



» 



Vinci, Leonardo da 
Wattean, Antoine 



» 



>» 



Weenix, J. • 
Werff, Adrian van der 



» 
»> 



>» 



Weyden, Eogier van der, 

attributed to . . , 

Wouwerman, P. . . . 



Zurbaran, F. . 



No. 

1525 Landscape and Cattle, 
2434 Vessels on the Sea, 
706 A ConfkLgration, 

299 Adoration of the Magi. 

300 The Marriage at Cana. 

301 Virgin and Child enthroned with Saints 

and Donators (?). 

302 Jesus on the way to Calvary. 

303 The Centurion before Cftrist, 

304 The Finding of Moses. 
309 Jesus Git Emmavs. 

314 Portrait of Daniel Barbaro. 

315 Presentation of Jesus in the Temple. 

— ^And others. 
30 Virgin, Child, and St. Johri. 

687 View on a Terras ujith Figures, 

688 A FSte Champetre. 
1577, 1579. Dead Game, 
1640 The Magdalen. 

1642 Infant Jesus and St. John. 
645 Abraham and Hagar. 
1646 A Lady and Gentleman playing Chess, 

1718 Chriit <m the Cross. 

1325-1389. Among iheSe nnmerous works, 
maoy of which are small, the follow- 
ing are the best : 

1339 Cavaliers at a Forge, 

1355 Departure for the Hunt. 

1356 Betumfrom the Hunt. 

1357 Horsemen at a Village Inn, 
1368 Hawking Party. 

1375 A Cavalry Skirmish, 
627 A Saint refusing the Papal Crown. 



FiAifkPdBT: tiis stJldsl. 



858 



THE STADEL PIOTUBE GALLfiBY AT FRANKPOBt. 

GATAIiOGtlA OF 1878 AND A BUTPLEMENT OF 1877. 



Amberger, 

Angelioo, Fra, da Fidsble 

Antonello da Messina . 

Baldovinetti, Alesso . • 
Bamaba da Modena 

Beg^, Gomelis . . . 

Bellini, Giovanni, School 
of 



Berokheyden, Gerrit 
Bol, Ferdinand . , 
Botticelli, Sandro 



» 



» 



BtonsreTf Adrian 
Brnyn, Bartholom'aus 



» 



f* 



99 



>» 



Ganale, Antonio . 



>♦ 



» 



Garpaocio, Vittore 
Gesare da Sesto . 
Geulen, J. van . 
GhriBtns, Petms . 
Gima da Gonegliano 
Glonet, Francois . 
Grivelli, Garlo 
Guyp, Albert . . 
Dow, G. . . . 
Diirer, Albrecht . 



♦» 



It 



No. 

84 Potfy-ait of a Young Man. 
7 Mudmna and Child erUht&n^ toUh 
AngeU. 
16 Head bf St Sebastian, 
426 Virgin adoring Child with 8aint6. 

1 itidohna and Child, 
227, 228. Tk>o Interiors. 

18 St, J&romd as a Cardinal. — ^A good re- 
petition of the picture in the National 
Gallery, London, No. 694^ also a 
school copy. 

267 The Stadthaus, Amsterdam, 
150, 151. 7W Portraits. 

10 Larg6 Portrait in j^ojQe. 

il Madonna and ChUd with John the 
Baptist. 
238,234. Peasants. 
234a a Man taking Medicine. 

101 Male Portrait, 

102 Male Portrait. 

103 Female Portrait. 
33 A Venetian Scene, 

35 A Venetian Scene. 

18a Madonna and Child loith St, John, 

36 St. Cathanne. 
121 PoHrait. 

60 Madonna and Child. 

19 Madonna arid ChUd, 
429 A smaU Portrait. 

14, 15. The Annunciation, 
166 Portrait of a Boy. 
244a Candlelight Scene, 

86 Portrait of a Girl. 

87 PortraU of his Father, 

2 A. 



354 



FBANKFOBT: THE STIDEL, 



Dyck, Anton van . . 
Eeckhout, Grerb. van den 
Everdingen, Aldert yan . 
Eyck, Jan van . . . 
Florentine School, artist 

unknown .... 
Francia, Francesco . . 
Gkiro&lo (Benvenuto 

Tisio) 

German School of the 

sixteenth century . . 
Goyen, Jan van 
Hals, Frans . 



» 



>t 



»> 



n 



Heem, Jan D. de. 
Hobbema, Meindert . 



»> 



>♦ 



Holbein, Hans, elder 

younger. 



» 



» 



» 



»i 



>» 



Hondecoeter, Melchior , 
Kalf, Willem . . . 
Koning, Pliilip de . 
Lippi, Fra Filippo . 

Lochner, Stephan, attri- 
buted to ... . 

Lucas van Leiden 
Macrino d'Alba . 
Mantegna, Andrea . 
Master of the ^ Death 

of the Virgin ' . 
Memling, Hans . 
Millet, Fraii9ois . . . 
Moretto (Alessandro 

Bonviciuo) . . . , 
ft . • . • 



No. 

117 Portrait of a Young Man. 
149 Portrait. 
201 Landscape, 

59 The Madonna^ *'del Luoa^ 

11a Portrait of a Qirl, 

41 Portrait of a Yowig Man, 

43 A Holy Family. 

89-92. PortraiU, 
173a a Canal with Boats, 

158 Portrait of a Man, 

159 Portrait of his Wife, 

160 Female Portrait. 
270 FruU Piece, 
203 A Landscape, 
203a a Landscape, 

76-82. The History of the Passion. 
83 A Portrait. 

83a a Portrait. — This is ascribed to 
Holbein : if so it is a very oaily work. 

276 PouUry. 

277 StiU-life. 
155 Landscape, 

8 A Crucifixion, 
57, 58. Two series of small worhs relating 
to the Martyrdom of the Twelve 
Apostles. 
70a Christ on the Cross. 
6 Three Compartments in one frame. 
13 St. Mark. 

99 An Altar-piece loith Wings, 
63 A Portrait. 
55 A Landscape. 

25 An Altar-piece. 

26 An Altar-piece. 



FBANKFORT: THE 8TADEL, 



355 



ni. G. B. . 
is, Pieter . . 
cher, Gaspar 
gino, P. . . 
ibo, Sebasi del 
brandt van Ryn 
ra, J. 
ens, P. P. 



sch, R. 
sdael, Jacob 
oferrato . 
blken, G. . ■ 
^eland, P. van 
lers, F. . 
Q,Jan. 



»> 



rbout, D., or Bouts . 
Lers, David, younger. 



»» 



»» 



>» 



3urg, G. . . 
K)lo, G. B. . 
stn, attributed to 
usquez, D. 

rnese, P. . . 
nix, Jan . 

» »> • • 
rden, Rogier van 

e elder 



der, 



den, Rogier van der, 
.e younger . . 



j» 



lants, Jan 



No. 

27 A Portrait 

262, 263. TiDO Church Interiors. 
236 A Portrait. 

39 Madonna and Child vn& St. John, 

22 Female Portrait 

144 A small Scripture Subject, 

52 Susanna and the Elders. 
112 King David and the Harp. 
113a Diogenes, — A sketch. 
115 Portrait of a Child. 
273 A Flower-piece. 
191 il Landscape. 

45 Virgin Praying. 
246 A Candlelight Subject 
168 Interior of a Slaughter-house. 
127 A Fight of Animals. 

231 A Man and Woman Joking, 

232 An Alchemist 

58a a Sibyl and the Emperor Augustus. 

134 The Smoker. 

135 Landscajpe. 

235 Figure in a/n Interior, 
32 A Group. 

23 A Portrait 

51 A Portrait of Cardinal Borgia. 

51a Portrait of the Infania Maria Teresa. 

30 Mars and Venus, 

278 Dead Crame, 

279 A Male Portrait 

61 A Madonna^ Child, and Saints. 

62 Three Panels, from the Life of St John 

the Baptist — Small replicas of the 
larger work at Berlin, No. 534b. 

67-69. Three large Panels, 
70 The Thief on the Cross. 
198 A Landscape, 



2 A 2 



356 



MUNICH: THE FINACOTHJElK. 



Albertinelli (Marintto) 
Allori, Alessandro 
Altdorfer, Albrecht 
Angelico, Fhu 
Beham, B. . . 



»♦- 



B6llotti, B^nuirdo 
Berchem, N. . . 
Both, A. and Jan 
Bottioelli, Sandro 
B6at8,.Dierick 



» 



»♦ 



99 



» 



BrU, Pfiul 
Brueghel, Jan 

Pieter 



>» 



99 



Burgkmair, Hang 



>» 



THE ROYAL PINAOOTHEK AT MUNICH. 
Becent Gatalooue, but without Date. 

Ptctures examined in 1875. 

No. 

545 An AnntMciation, 
472 Mythologicdl Subject, 
761 Alexander's Victory over Darius. 
1203^ Qcd the Father in a Glory cf Angels. 

72 A Woman brought to life in the pfetenee 
of the TrtLe Cross. 

99 The Devotion of Marcus Gurtiue. 
476 View of Munich. 
1028, 1027, 1030. Landscapesv 
173 Italian Landscape. 
555 An Entombment. 
636 Isfraslites gathering Minna. 
647 Meeting of Abraham a/nd Melchisedek. 
650 The Kiss of Judas. 
805 Landscape. 
-^ Several in Oabinet IX. 
784 Preaching of John the Saptieit. 
80r ViUdge Fair, Landscape* 

65 J^. John on the Isle of Patmos. 

73 Esther before King Aha^uerus, 



»» 



» 



Canale, Antonio (Gana- 

letto) . . . 
Gano, Alonso . . 



Garacci,' Agostino 



Lodoyioo 
Gima da Gonegliano 



» 



.. 1209, 1210,. 1213, 1214. Views of Venice. 
. 353 Appearance of Virgin and Chiid to 8t. 

Anihony: 
, 422 8t Francis of A'ssisi receiving the 

Stigrnatoi 
.. 435 8t Francis of Assisi. 
. 1200 Madonna, St. Jerome, and Magdalen, 
GlaudeGelee (Lorraine). 391-399. Variotia examples. 

„ „ „ . 407-416. A pair of Landscapes. 

Granach, Lucas, elder . 56 The Woman taken in AdvUery, 

. 729 Adam and Eve in Paradise. 



>» 



» 



MUNICH: TEE PINACOTHEK. 



357 



Cranach, Lucas, elder 



»» 






n 
» 



Gredi, Lorenzo di 



Cuyp, A. 



»» 



Denner, Balthasar 



M 



99 



Dow, G. 



»» 



• • » 



Dughet, Gaspar (Pons- 

sin) .... 
Durer, Albrecht . 



>» 
»> 
>» 
»> 
»> 
>» 
>» 
»> 



» 
»» 

» 
»» 
>» 

n 

» 



Dyck, Anton van 



99 
>» 
»» 

» 

»» 
>» 
>» 
» 

» 
» 



» 

» 

>» 
»> 
»» 
»» 
»» 



Francia, F. 



No. 

733 Portraits of Luther and Melcmcthon, 

734 Ftrgfin and Child. 
736 Ziof and At8 Daughters. 
749 Triptyeh — The Crucifixion. 

553 ^ Natimtff. — Almost identical with his 
picture at the Uffizi, Florence, No. 
1287. 
1004 Near a Camp. 
1035 Fowh in a Stable. 
769 PoHfait of an Old Man. 
779 Portrait of an Old W&maru 
864 His own Pottrait. 
876 The Charlatan. 

1259 Laridscape. — And. others, 

1 Portrait of Stephan Saumgartner. 

2 The Nativity. 

3 Portrait of Lucas Baumgartner. 

71 The Apostles St. John arid St. Peter. 

76 The AposOes St. Paul and St. Mark. 
716 His own Portrait. 
720 Portrait of his FaiJier. 
731 Portrait of Michael Wohlgemuth. 
739 Portrait -of a Young Man. 
193 Portrait of Libertij Organist of Antwerp, 
203 Pieta. 

209 Portrait of Charles MdWry. 
212 A Pieta. 

313-4 Burgomaster of Antwerp. 
315 The Wife of a Burgomaster. 

927 Portrait of Queen Mana de' Medici. 

928 The Ahb4 Alexander Scaglio. 

929 Count John of Nassau. 

930 Oustavus Adolphus of Sioeden. 
934 Tfee Painter Palamedesz. 

940 Coun^ o/ WaUenstein. 

575 Virgin and Child. — Catalogued as 

" after Francia.*' Is a fine work : C. 

andO. 



358 



MUNICH: THE PINACOTHEK, 



Francia, F. 
Fyt, Jan . 



»» 



»» 



n 



M 



Ghirlandajo, Dmnenico . 



w 



»> 



Giordano, Luca . . . 
Giorgione, attributed to. 



»» 



n 



Giotto di Bondone 



♦> 



♦» 



» » • • 

Gk)yen, Jan van . . . 

Haarlem, Gerhard van . 

Hals, Frans . . ' . . 

Hobberaa, M 

Holbein, Hans, younger. 



Hooghe, Pieter de 
Jordaens, Jacob . 
Ealf, Willem . . 
Eaufmann, Angelica 
Le Brun, 0. . 



Leiden, Lucas van 
Lippi, Fra Filippo 



99 



n 



»» 



Filippino . 



Lotto, Lorenzo . 
Maas, Nicholas . 



» 



»» 



Mahnse, Jan Gossaert . 



No. 

577 The Virgin adoring the Infant ChrUi. 
825 Game guarded by Dogs, 
339 Boar-hunt. 
341 Game, 

538 Dead Christ with Saints. 
557 T^ Madonna in Glory toith Saints. 
442 The Massa/yre of the Innocents, 
582 Fortrait of a Member of the Fondaeo.— 
Without doubt the work of Palma 
Vecchio : 0. and 0. 
470 Woman vfith a Mirror. — ^Undoubtedly a 
work by Pordenone: 0. and C. 
There are many replicas extant of 
this under the name of Giorgione. 
1148 The Last Supper. 
1152 Christ on the Cross. 
1420 Christ in Limbo. 
1878 Landscape. 

84, 85, 86. A Triptych. 
811 Large Family Group, 
1036 Landscape, 
17 The Martyrdom of StSehaxtian, — Others 
attributed to him here are probably 
not genuine. 
1122 An Interior. 
324 Saiyr and Peasant, 
1384 StiUrlife. 
152 Her own Portrait. 
392 The Repentant Magdalen, — Said to be a 

portrait of Madame de la Yalli^. 
743 AUar-piece. 
554 The Annunciation, 
1169 Virgin and Child, 
563 Christ appearing to His Mother unth 

Saints, 
552 Marriojge of St. Catharine. 

190 Portrait of a Young Man, 

191 Portrait of a Young Woman, ■ 
99 St, Michael and Donaior, 



MUNICH: THE PINACOTHEK. 



859 



Mabuse, Jan Gk)ssaert . 



>» 



>» 



Ma,ntegna, Andrea 
Masaccio . 
Masolino . 
Matsys, Quintin . 
Memling, Hans . 



»» 



»> 



»» 



»» 



>» 



99 



Menga, Anton Raphael . 
Metsa, G. . . . 



»♦ 



Mieris, Frans, elder 



j> 



»» 



n 



» 



» 



»> 



Mignon, A. . 
Moretto, II 
Moro, Antonio 
Murillo 



99 
»» 
»» 
»» 
»» 



Neer, Artus van der 
Netscher, G. . . 
Ostade, Adrian van 



>♦ 



„ Isaac . 
Palma Vecohio 



Perugino 



»» 



Piombo, Seb. del 

buted to 
Raphael Sanzio 

9* 99 

99 »» 

99 » 



attri 



■) 



No. 

633 Jupiter and Danae. 

707 Madonna and Child. 

549 Virgin and Child enthroned wiUi Saints, 
1150 His ovm Portrait. 
1164 Annun>ciation, 
80 The Money-changers. 

640 St. John the Baptist. 

641 AdoraUon of the Ma^i. 

642 St. Christopher with Infant Christ. 
655 The Seven Joys of the Virgin. 

153 His ovm Portrait. 

957 A Kitchen Interior. 
1121 The Feast. 

879 The Sick Woman. 

988 «* io jBofte de iifiem." 
1040 T%e Breakfast. 

108 Fruit and StiU-life. 

452 Portrait of an Ecdesiastin, 
1293 Jtfoie Portrait. 

348 Tioo Beggar-boys. 

349 7Vw) Spanish Beggar-hoys. 
857 Tiro Spanish Beggar-boys. 
368 ^ Spanish Fruit-girl. 

371 fiif. JPVa7M»8 healing a Paralysed Man. 

376 ilw OW PToTnan a/kZ jBoy. 
1379 Moonlight. 

780 iln Interior. 

835 Interior of a Dutch Cabin. 

878 Interior of a Dutch Inn. 

843 The Skaters. 

588 Virgin twrshipped by St. Boch. 

561 Virgin appearing to St. Bernard. 

590 Virgin adoring the Infant Christ. 

579 2%ree Saints. — A forged inscription : 
C. and C. 

534 Holy Family " del Canigiani* 

547 The Madonna " deZZa Tenda." 

585 Portrait of Bindo AUoviti. 
1173 Baptism of Christ (predeUa), 



»» 



860 



MUNICH: THE FINACOTHIBK, 



Buphael Sanzio . 



»» 



n 



»» 



>» 



Bavesteyn, Joh. van 

♦> »♦ - 

Bembrandt van Hyn 



»> 


»» 


»» 


>» 


w 


»» 


99 


»> 


» 


»» 


»» 


» 


J» 


» 


»> 


♦> 


»> 


» 


»> 

Beni, Guido 
Bibera, Jose , 


• 



»» 



»> 



Bubens, P. P 



» 
»> 
» 

w 
»» 

»» 

n 

»» 



Buysch, Bfu^el . 



No. 

1180 Head of (he Archangel Miche^ 
1185 The Beaurrection (predella). 
1206 The Madonna « di Tempi:* 

182 Portrait of a Man. 

184 Portrait of a Woman. 

323 Portrait of GoveH Flinch. 

329 Portrait of the Wife of Q. Fliv^ik. 

847 The Ascention ..." 

848 The Nativity . . . Series of 

849 DesoerUfrom the Cross ." I scenes frm 

850 C%n8< j^aised on t^ Cro8«| t^ JUye 

851 The Resurrection . . of ChrUi. 

852 The Burial .... J 
860 Autumn Landscape. 

882 cTeft^ «n ^ TempZe. 
1299 ^o2y FarnOy. 
527 J.8«w»p^«o» o/ f^ Ftrgin. 
363 2%e Body of 8t. Andrew taken from l 

Oro88. 
886 8t. ParHholoTnew. 

244 Porfraii of Count Arundel and > 

Wife. 

245 The Lion-hunt. 

2.^0 The Fall of the Condemned. 

256 His own Portrait and that of Isabe 

Brandt. 
258 The Last Judgment. 
260 Portrait of Helena Fourmer^. 
269 Massacre of the Innocents. 
281 The Triumph of Religion over Vice. 
287 Btibens and Helena Fov^mneat. 
889 Study for the Last Judgment. 
908 The Resurrection of the Just. 

916 Landscape. 

917 Battle of the Amazons. 
922 Landscape. 

1807 Assumption of the Virgin {Sketch), 
1385 The Conversion of St. Paul (Sketch). 
862 Flowers in a Crystal Vase. 



MUNICH: THE TINACOTHEK. 



861 





No. 


lluysch, Baohel . 


. . 1001 StiU'life. 


» » • 


. . 1016 Flotoers, <ft«. 


Huysdael, Jacob . 


. . 322 Landicape, 


j> » • 


. . 1038 Landscape. 


j» » • 


. 1045 Landscape. 


>» »> • 


. . 1096 Winter So&ne, 


Sarto, Andrea del 


. . 1174,1175,1181,1186. Four 8tudie$ for the 




Frescoes in the Scdlsso at Florence, 


Schongauer, l^artin 


. . 738 His own Portrait. 


Snyders, Frans . 


. . 205 BtiOrlife. 


» jj • 


. . 297 T%oo Lionesses pursuing a Kid. 


>» >» 


. . 305 ^ LUmess and a Wild Boar. 


» »> • 


. . 317 u4 Boao'-hmd. 


Sodoma, H (Bazzi) 


. . 1194 Hdy Family. 


Steen, Jan . . . 


. . 842 -4 Quarrel. 


»» »> . • . 


, . 855 The Doctor^ s Visit 


Teniers, David, youn 


ger. 299 Italian Fair. 


j» >» »> 


. 840 Peasants playing Cards. 


>» M >» 


. 844 Players and Drinkers in an Inn. 


»> »> » 


. 1125 Players and Drinkers in an Inn. 


Terburg, G. . . . 


. 243 Interior of a Peasants Boom. 


>» . . . 


. 1062 InUrior. 


Tiarini, Alessandro . 


. 483 Mythohgical Subject. 


Tiziano Vecellio . 


. 467 Portrait of a Man. 


»» »> • • 


. 496 Portrait of Charles V. 


>» »» • • 


. 524 Venus initiating a Young Bacchante. 


»» » • • 


. 587 Holy Family. 


>» »» • • 


. 591 Madonna and Child. 


»> »♦ • • 


. 1238 Jupiter and Antiope, 


»> »> • • 


. 1329 The Crouming wUh Thorns. 


Veen, Otho van . . 


. 827-832. The Triumph of the Catholic 




Churchy represented aUegorically. 


Velasquez . . . 


. 366 His ovm Portrait, 


» . • . 


. 366a Male Portrait 


„ . . . 


. 367 Bust Portrait of Card. Bospigliosi. 


Veraet, C. J. . . . 


— Several. 


Veronese, Paolo . . 


. 1224 Adoration of the Magi. 


Waterlo, Ant. . . 


. 210 Wooded Landscape, 


M J> • • 


• 1375 Wooded Landscape. 



862 



MUNICH AND NtfRNBERO. 



Watteau, Antoine 
Weenix, Jan 



» >> 



»> 



»> 



Werff, Ad. van der 
Weyden, Bogier van der. 



»» 



»» 



» 



» 



»♦ 



»> 



Wohlgemuth, Michael . 



♦» 
»> 
»♦ 
>» 
»> 
» 



Wouwerman, P. . 
Wynants, Jan 



» 



♦> 



»» »» 

Znrbaran, Francisco 



n 



» 



No. 

1312 Ladies at%d Gentlemen in a Park. 

227 Dead Game, 

320 Dead Game. 

326 A Dog overthrows a cage of Pigeons. 

332 Dead Game and Poultry. 

340 Dead Game and Dogs. 
1068-1092 in Cabinet XVI. 

627 The Annunciation. 

628 The Adoration of the Magi. 

629 Presentation in the Temple. 
634 8t. Luke painting the Virgin. 

22 Christ in the Garden. 
27 The Crucifixion. 
34 Descent from the Cross. 
39 The Besurrection. 
82 The Marriage of St. Catharine. 
1415 The Twelve Apostles Departing. 
1423 A Crucifixion. 
208 The Stag-hunt— And others. 
309 Landscape, Morning. 
319 Xran{2«caj>e, Evening. 
1118 Xrandsejope. 
351 JBe^um of the Virgin and St. Johnfroi 

the Tomb. 
373 A Saint in Meditation. 



THE ROYAL GALLERY IN THE MORITZ-KAPELLE, 

NtRNBERG. 

Catalogue without Date. 

Pictures examined in 1875. 

No. 

12 Martyrdom of Stephen. 
38 Stephen hefore the High Priest. 
44 St. Christopher and Infant Christ. 
105 St. Sebastian and Diocletian, 
— Seveial, b\it ivot important. 



Altdorfer, Albrecht 



>» 



>♦ 



Burgkmair, Hans 



ff 



>♦ 



Cranachf Luc&s, elder 



ff 



w 



younger — Beveta\,'V)\v\.Tio\.SxK^Qt\as!k\.» 



8TUTTGABT: TTHE GALLERY. 



363 



Diirer, Albrecht . . 
Holbein, Hans, younger 
Mekenen, Israel van 



»» 



r> 



Memliog, Hans . 
Schongauer, or Schon, 
Martin .... 



♦» 



Wohlgemuth, Michael 
Zeitblom, Bartholomaus 



» 



» 



No. 

102 EcceH&mo, 

89 Portrait of Calvin. 

6 The Birth of the Virgin, 

18 The Annunciation. 

23 The Besurrection, 

66 Joachim and Anna teachijig tfie Virgin. 
115 Mary Cleophas. 
45, 53, 74, 80. SainU. 
65 St. Ursula. 
58 8t, Margaret. 



THE BOYAL GALLERY OF PICTURES AT STUTTGART. 

Catalogue op 1876. 

The only motive for a visit to this gallery is to become familiar with 
the works of Bartholomaus Zeitblom, the most distinguibhed master 
at Ulm of the Swabian school, as well as with some by his followers. 
A few other pictures will be meutioned among the 700 canvases, 
most of them without any merit, which form this collection. 



Beham, Earth. . 
Cranach, Lucas, elder 



»» 



»> 



>j 



Voe, C. von Ulm . 
Zeitblom, Barth. . 



»> 



M 



»> 



»> 



In this room there 
the Swabian school. 



Boom IIL 

No. 

. 4H5 St Beneddct in a Landscape, 

, 368 Female Portrait. 

, 457 Male Portrait. 

, 430-432. Sacred Subjects. 

. 411, 412, 429. John the Baptist and others. 

, 421-427. An altar-piece, of which the prin- 
cipal subject is the Visitation, No. 
422, dated 1496. The other subject 
is the Mira^cle of St. Valentine. The 
remaining panels are saints. 

. 439, 440, 443, 444, 446. Figures of Saints. 

, 452 The Birth of Christ. 
are several good "Nifoika Vii^ ■vxsSea^s^'a. ^sssas^«c^^^ 



364 



8TUTTGABT AND VIENNA. 



Room II. — Italian School, 



Bellini, Giovanni, attri- 
buted to . . . 
Titian, attributed to 



No. 



4 Dead Chritt. 

5 Bepentani Magdalen, — ^A good school 

copy of the Naples original. 



Cabinet V. 



No, 



Does, J. van der . . . 272 Sheep and Dog, 



Hobbema, M. 
Hondecoeter, M. . 



>» 



Murillo, attributed to 
Neer, A. van der 
Bubens, P. P. . . 



Room II. — Netherlandish School. 



No. 

362 Landscape. 

259 Fowls, dkc. 

264 Fowls, &c. 

316 Bmfs Portrait. 

334 Landscape. 

262 Weeping Magdalen. 



Netscher, G. 



Corridor. 

* 

No. 

561-573. Portraits. 



THE BELVEDEBE AT VIENNA. 
Catalogub of 1870. 



No. 



AUori, Gristofano 



. . 20, Salle IV. Ital. 1" ^tage. Judith with 

the Head of Holofemes.—A poor 

copy of the famous picture at the 

Pitti. 

Amberger, Christopher . 88, 94. Male Portraits.— Severol in Salle I. 

2"* ^tage. 



VtMUfA: TSa BMLVEDEBR 



365 



Antonello da Messina , 

Backhuizen, Ltidolph 
Bldflk H. de 
BourguigDon . 

Balen, J. van 



Bramer, L. . 

Berckem, N. . 



Binaiti, Maroo 
Bassano, Jaeopo 



n 



j> 



BeUini, GKovaami 



Boni&zk) . • 



n 



»♦ 



j> 



• • 



Bordone, Paris 
Brueghel, Jan (Velours), 



>» 



>» 



»> 



» »♦ 



»> » 



» »» 



Brueghel the elder 



No. 

eo, Salle VII. Ital. 1" ^tage. Dead Chnd 

and Angels, — Betouched. 
— Sereral in Salle II. Neer. 1"" ^tage. 
20, Salle II. 2^ ^tage. Landscape, 
15, 18, SaUe VIII. Neer. 1" ^tage. BaHle- 

pieces. 

25, Salle V. Neer. 1" ^tage. Virgin^ 

Childy and 8aints.^-And others. 

44, Salle I. Neer. 1" ^tage. Vanity, 
48, Salle I. Neer. 1" etage. IrutcMity. 

92, CaMnet Vert, 1" ^tage. Landscape and 

Herds, 

93, Cabinet Vert, I*' etage. Landscape and 

Serde, 
62, Salle H. Ital. I*' ^tage. The OaUing cf 

Jamee and John, 
9, Salle I. Ital. l*' ^tage. Small com- 
position. 
12, Salle I. Ital. I"' etage. The Chad 

Samaritan, 
43, Salle II. Ital. 1" ^tage. A Venus,-^ 

Painted in 1515. 
8, Sane n. Ital. 1" etage. Virgin, Child, 

and Saints, 
24, Salle Vn. ItaL 1" ^ge. St, Francis 

and St. Andrew. 

26, SaUe VII. Ital. 1" ^tage. Si, Jercme 

and St. John Baptist, 
1, Salle I. Bez-de-chauss^e. St. Jerome 
and St James, 

— Several. 

56, Salle Vn. Neer. 1" ^tage. The Four 
Elements. 

45, Cabinet Vert, 1" ^tage. Adoration of 

the Magi, 
2f7, Cabinet Blanc, 1*" ^tage. Flowers, &c, 
61, Salle III. 2°* ^tage Landscape. 

— Several in Salle III. 2"* ^tage. Note 

Nos. 1, 9, 11, 44, among others. 



366 



VIENNA: THE BELVEDERE. 



Burgkmair . . . . 



» 



Ganaletto 



Gapolle, Van de 
Garaoci, Ag. . 



»» 



>» 



Ann. . 



Lod. 



Caravaggio 



)> 



Carpacoio, V. 



Champaigne, Philippe de 
Gignani, Garlo . . . 
Gima da Gonegliano . . 



Glouet, Fr. 



Gock, M. 
Coello . 
Gorreggio 



»> 
»> 

n 
» 



No. 

50, SaUe I. 2''^ ^tao^e. A BekMo-Ufe 

and Passion of Christ. — ^A large and 

important work. 
104, Salle I. 2"* ^tage. Two PortraiU i* 

one Frame. 
23, 25, Salle lY. Bez-de-chanss^e. Tvoo 

Views of Vienna. 
54, Salle II. Neer. 1" ^tage. Seorpiece. 
17, Salle V. Ital. 1" ^tage. 8t. FrwusU 

of Assisi receiving ihe Stigmata. 
12, Salle VI. Ital. 1" ^ta^. Chrid and 

the Woman of Samaria^ 
20, Salle V. Ital. 1" ^tage. 8t Francis of 

Assist in Contemplation, 
5, Salle II [. Ital. I"' ^tage. David toift 

the Bead of Ooliath. 
27, Salle II I. Ital. 1" ^tage. Madonna « of 

the Rosary." 
25, Salle VII. Ital. 1" e'tage. Christ adored 

hy four Angels. 

2, Salle I. Neer. 1" ^tage. Adam and 

Eve mourning for Abel, 

3, Salle V. Ital. l*' ^tage. Virgin and 

Child. 
56, Salle II. Ital. l** €tage. ' Madonna 

and Saints. 
47, Salle VI. Neer. 1" ^tage. Portrait 

of Charles IX. 
77, Salle II. 2»* ^tage. Building of Babel. 
29, Salle IV. Rez-de-chanssfe Portrait 
9, Salle VI. Ital. !•' etage. Virgin and 

Child — knovm as the " ZingareUa.'* 
10, Salle VI., Ital. l** etage. MatePoHrait 
19 „ „ „ Jupiter and lo. 

21 „ „ „ Ganymede car- 

ried by the Ea^gle. 
25, Salle VI. Ital. 1" ^tage. Ecce H<mo. 
17, Salle VII. Ital. !«• ^tage. St. Sebastian. 

—Bust. 



• • 



VIENNA: THE BELVEDERE. 



367 



Oortona, Pietro da . 
Oranaoh, Lucas, elder 



<n 



»> 



>» 



Drayer 

Deelen, Van 

Diepenbeck 
Dolci, Carlo 



}9 



» 



Dow, G. . 



n 



Durer, A. . 






>» 



„ youngor 



Early Flemish School 



« 



»> 



» 



Es, Van .... 



Dusart, 0. 



No. 

33, Salle in. Ital. I*' ^tage. Bagar 
returns to Abraham, 

— Several in Salle I. 2»* ^tage. No. 64, A 

Portrait, 
71, Salle I. 2»* ^tage. ChHst and the Hdy 
Women, 

— Several in Salle I. 2°* ^tage. 

14, Salle III. Neer. 1" ^tage. The Virgin 

and 8L Theresa, — And others. 

1, Cabinet Vert, 1" ^tage. Palace and 

Gurdens. 

2, Salle Vin. Neer. I*' e'tage. Allegory. 
6, Salle IV. Ital. 1" ^tage. Sincerity, 

Allegorical, 
9, Salle IV. Ital. 1" ^tage. Virgin and 
Chad. 
20, Cabinet Vert, 1" ^tage. Doctor and 

Old Woman, 
52, Cabinet Vert, 1" ^tage. Old Woman 
at a Window, 
5, Salle I. 2"* ^tage. Portrait of Maxi- 
milian I, 

15, Salle I. 2°* ^tage. King of Persia per- 

secuiting the Christians. 

18, Salle I. 2»« ^tage. The Holy Trinity 
surrounded by Angels, 

26, Salle I. 2"* ^tage. Virgin and Child. 

28, Salle I. 2°* ^tage. Virgin and Child, 

29 „ „ Toumg Man^s Por- 

trait, 

80, Salle I. 2»* ^tage. PoHrait of Johann 
KM)erger. 

96, Salle I. 2"* e'tage. Small Triptych, 

98 „ „ The Win^s of above, 

75, Salle IL 2°* dtage. Bepose in Egypt. 

14, 15, Salle I. Neer. 1" ^tage. Fish, &e. 
T—Figures by Jordaens. 

98, Cabinet Vert, 1*' ^tage. Interior of an 
Inn. 



$68 



VIENNA: TEE BELVEDERE, 



Dyck, Anton van 



» >» • 

>» . M • 

»♦ » • 

»» f» • 

/» n • 

» w • 

j> j> • 

»» w • 

Eyok, Jan van 



99 



n 



Farinalo, P. . 
Feti, D. . . 



»> 



I*linok, G. . 
Floris, Frans . 
Fiancia, Francesco, 

tributed to . 
Francken, F. elder 
Fyt,Jan . , 

German School 
Giordano, Luca 



Giorgione 



6,t'\ 



• • 



No. 

2, Salle in. Neer.- 1« ^ge. Vtrfin, 

Child, and Saints, 
4, Salle ni. Neer. 1* ^tage. Parttatt. 
$ „ „ ,y Portrait. 

S „ „ „ Virgin and 

Donator, 
10, Salle ni. Neer. 1« ^tage. PoHrait oj 

a Young Man in Armour, 
18, Salle III. Neer. 1" ^tage. Venus and 

Vulcan, 
32, Salle III. Neer. l*' etage. Samson and 

Delildh, 
3d, Salle m. Neer. 1«' ^tage. Holy 

Famity, 
34, Salle III. Neer. V ^tage. MagdaUn, 

— ^And many portraits. 
13, Salle n. 2»'» etage. Portrait of Jan 

van der Leeuuj. 
42, Salle H. 2»* e't&ge. Portrait of Jododus 

Vydts. — Catalogued as Cardinal deUa 

Croee, 
40, Salle I. Ital. 1" ^tage. Pagan Sacri- 
fice. 

10, Salle m. Ital. 1«' ^tage. Market with 

many Figures. 
47, SaUe III. Ital. l*' ^tage. Marriage of 
St, Catharine. 

11, Salle I. Neer. 1" ^tage. Ati Old Man, 
16, 17, Salle HI. 2»** e'tage. Adam and Eve, 
18, Salle V. Ital. 1" etage. Virgin and 

Child uoith Saints. 
34, 35, SaUe HI. 2°'* ^tage. Large Worhs. 
24, Salle I. Neer. l*' ^tage. Dead Game. 

— And others. 
47, SaUe I. 2"* ^tage. Fine Altar-piece. 
44, Salle VII. Ital. 1" e'tage. Archangd 

Michael and FaUen Angels. 
10, SaUe II. Ital. I*' ^tage. YouCk attacked 

hy a Soldier, 



VIENNA: THE BELVEDEBE. 



369 



No. 
Giorgione, attribnted to . 07, Salle II. ItaL 1* ^tafi^e. Th» Thme 

MaOiemaUeiani, — Finished by 8eb. 
del Piombo. 
Goes, Hngo van der . . 6, Salle II. 2*^ €tage. Virgin and 

Chad. 
€k>yen, J. van ... 39, Salle YL "Neer, I*' €tage. Landscape, 

Gnercino 80, Salle Y. Ital. I*' €tage. Betum of the 

ProdigeiL ■ 

„ 82, Salle Y. ItaL 1« ^tage. The Prodigal 

Son, 
Haarlem, Gerhard Tan . 58, Salle II. 2<^ ^tage. Pieth. 

„ M . 60 M 99 Legend of 8L John 

the Baptist, 
'HalSjFrans , , , . 4, Salle YT. Neer. 1? ^tage. Portradto/a 

Young Man. 
Hamilton, J. G. . . . 22, Salle L Neer. 1*" ^tage. Study of 

Horaes. 
Heem, Jobann D. de 18, 21, 24, 28 in Cabinet Blanc, 1*' €tage. 

StiO-Ufe, Ac, 
Hobbema, M. . . . 57, Salle IL Neer. I*' ^tage. Landscape 

and CaiUe. 
Holbein, Hans, elder 59, Salle L 2"^ €tage. Portrait. 

„ Hans, yonnger . 27, Salle 1. 2^ €tage. Portrait of a Young 

Woman, — Small. 
„ „ „ . 61, Salle I. 2"* ^tage. Portrait of Jane 

Seynumr, 
„ „ • „ . 62, Salle I. 2"^ ^tage. Portrait of John 

Chambers, 
n „• „ • 67,68,Sa11eI.2'^^tage. Mah and Female 

Portraits, 
n n 99 ' 83, Salle 1. 2*^ ^tage. PoHrait of Oeryck 

Tybis. 
M „ n ' 85, SaUeL2^^tage. Portrait of a Young 

Man, 
Hondecoeier, M. . . . 21, Salle L Neer. I*' ^tage. Poultry and 

Game, 
„ ... 18, Salle lY. Bez-de-ohaussee. Poultry. 

Hoogstraeten, S. van . 9, Salle I. Neer. I*' ^tage. Man looking 

out of a Window, 

2 B 



870 



VONNjL: the BELVMDMSm. 



HiijBiuiky Jau Tftn 
Josdaesifl, Jw)ob . . 



Leox 

Lotto»Loienio . . • 



lioini, B. 



MaboBe, Jan Goesaert . 
Mantogna, Andrea . . 



Mantt% Oarlo . • • 

Master of the « DeaOi of 

the Virgin * 
Hemling^HoDB 



Met8o,G. 



Mieris, F. Tan 



Moretto 



Horo, Antonio 









Honcheron • 



n 



• • 



• • 



• • 



No. 

ie» 17, Okboiet Blaiie» 1* ^la«^ Flomn, 
27, SaUe y IL 1* ^tage. AlhOckFetuL 
47 „ n MyihologieaKkm- 

12, Salle YIII. Neer. 1« ^tage. .^fle^ory. 
47, Salle II* Ital. 1« etage. F#^ oail 

€M<2 ofKl Saints. 
12» Salle lY. Ital. 1« ^tage. ^erodtof.- 

Mncli. injured. 
9, Salle n. 2'^ ^tage. Virgin and CkOd. 

46, ^\e YL ItaL 1* ^ti^. 8L 8eba»- 

Uan. 
4SM5 and 47-50, Salle YX ItaL V ^nge. 

Triumph of JuliuB Cmsar. 
1, Salle IIL ItaL 1* ^tage. IkoA qf 

Joseph, — And others. 

fi, Sallell. 2^ ^tage. Large Triptych, 
12,SalleIJ« 2'^ etage. DesomU fnm ike 

dross, 
9,.Calanet Yert, 1« ^ago. The Lom- 

maker, 
14, Cabinet Yert, 1* aage. A Shop, 
18 „ ^ The Dactoi't 

Visit. 

7, Salle II. ItaL 1* aage. SL Jfutina 

Martyr. 

9, Salle Yn. Neer. 1« ^tage. PoriraUof 

ike Duchess of Parma. 
52, SaUe YU. Neer. I*' ^tage. Porfrxitt of 

a Lady. 
20, Salle lU. 2-^ ^ge. Card, GranveOe. 
29 „ „ PoriraU of a 

Young-Man. 
&f SaUe n. Neer. 1* ^tage. Landscape, 
— Figures by Yan de Yelde. . 

8, Salle IL Neer. 1^ ^tage. Lamd(tet^ 

-!-Figtires by Yan de Yelde. 



VIENNA: THE BELVEDEBE, 371 

No. 

Kee£i, Pieter, elder . . 68, Cabinet Tert, 1" ^tage. ImUrior of a 

Cathedral, 
Neer, Artos van der . . 9, Salle IX. ' Neer. 1"' ^tage. Landscape, 
99 99 »9 • • 1^ 99 -99 99 Liandsoape, 

Qrley, Bernard Yan . . 59, Salle JL. 2""^ ^tage. iw Panels in one 

Frame, 
Falma, Jaoopo (fl Yeo- 

ohio) 10, Sallel. Ital. l«'^tage. A Young Hero. 

n 2, Salle IL Xtal. l-'^tage. VwikUi4m of 

'ihe Virgin. 

„ 69 Salle JL l"* aage. Virgin and Child 

•«iih Saints. — ^Injured. 
9, ..... 9, Salle n. I*' ^tage. A Young Venetian 

Lady, 
n ..... 11, Salle XL 1" ^tage. Female Portrait.— 

Maoh injured by re-painting. 

„ 12, Salle U. l^^^age. Female Portrait 

„ ..... 18 „ „ Lueretia. 

„ •••••. X4 „ 99 ul v^rl, 

„ ..... 12, SaUe VH. ItaL 1" ^tage. Venetian 

Q4fL 

„ 49, Salle Vn. 1" ^tage. Venetian Lady, 

Pfttfaiir ..... 48, Salle XL 2>^ 4tage. Baptism of Christ. 

Penoz,G 54, Salle L 2"* ^tage. PoHraiL 

n 58 „ „ IHptyeh, 

Pemgino 12, SaUe IIL ItaL I"' ^tage. Virgin and 

Child and two Female Saints. 

„ 19, Salle in. l*' ^tage. Baptism of Christ, 

9> ..... 81 „ „ Virgin and Child 

enthroned with Saints, 
Pourbiifl, Erans, elder ^ 18, 19, 28, Salle IIL 2'^^tage. PoHraits. 
„ „ yoimgar 23, 24, 80, Salle III. 2''^ ^tage. PoHraits. 

B&^fiuieL 55, Salle in. ItaL 1« ^tage. Madonna*' a 

la verdure,*' — Painted in 1505. 
Bembrandt .... 28, Salle I. Neer. I*' ^tage. Apostle PauL 
„ .... 38,<Salle L I*' ^tage, Eooles N^er.. Por- 

trait, 
M .... 89,.SaUe I. 1« ^tage. Portrait qf hi$ 

Mother, 

2 B 2. 



872 



VIENNA: THE BELVEDEBE. 



Rembrandt 



»» 



» 



Beni, Gaido . 



w >» 



»» »» 



n ♦♦ 



Bigand, Hyaointhe 

Bomano, Giulio . 

Bosa, Salvator . 

♦» »» • 

»» »» • 

Bubens, P. P. 

»» • 

»» • 

»♦ • 

♦» • 

»♦ • 



»• 



No. 

40, Salle 1. 1*" ^tage^ PariraU of a Biek 

Dutchman. 

41, SaUe 1. 1*' ^tage. PortraU €f a Tmmg 

Man. 

42, SaUe 1. 1*' ^tage."^ Portrait of Hinmlf 

at the age of 45. 
45, Salle 1. 1*' ^tage. Portrait of Hinmlf 

ai an advanced age. 
1, Salle V. ItaL 1" ^tage. Baptimn of 

Christ. 
15, Salle y. ItaL I*' ^tage. AUegory of 

the Four Seasons, 
25, Salle Y. Ital. 1« ^tage. Virgin and 

Child. 
81, Salle y. Ital. I*' ^tage. EeoeHomo.— 

And others. 
73, Cabinet yert, I*' ^tage. PortraUoffhe 

Duchess Elizabeth of Lorraine. 
51, Salle III. Ital. l"" ^tage. St. Margaret 

and the Dragon. 
56, Salle m. Ital. I*' ^tage. Battle-pieee. 
57 „ M » BaUle-pieoe. 

12, Salle ly. Ital. Bez-de-chanaa^ BatOe- 

piece. 

1, Salle ly. I*' ^tage. The Exorcimn of 

St. Ignatius Loyola, 

2, Salle ly. V 4t&ge, The Assumption of 

the Virgin. 

3, SaUe TV. 1~ e'tage. St, Francis 

Xavier working Miracles. 

4, 5, 6, Salle ly. 1" ^tage. Three Figures. 
7, Salle rV. 1" ^tage. Boar-hunt, 

8 „ „ SL Anilfrose re- 

fuses entrance to Theodore the Great 
in Milan Cathedral. 

10, Salle ly. 1" ^tage. The Four Quarters 

of the Olcbe represented aHegoricaUy. 

11, Salle ly. 1" ^tage. HU own Portrait 

at the age of 60. 



VIENNA: THE BELVEDERE. 



373 



Babens, P. P. 



** 



** 

» 



BuyBoh, B. • 
Bnysdael, J. . 



9> 



Byokaert 



Sarto, Andrea del 



Sassoferrato . • • • 



Saveiy, B. 
Sohalken, G. 



• • • 



Schiavone, Andrea . . 



9f 



99 



Schonganer .... 
Schooreel, Jan . . . 



No. 

16, 8aUe lY. I*' ^tage. Ctmoit and Iphi- 
ge/MO, 

22, SaUe IV. I*' ^tege. Portrait of Eliza- 

heth, first Wife of PhUip IV. of 
Spain. 
1, Salle ¥. !•' ^tage. Betablo vjith two 
wing»-^t. Ildephonto. 

3, Salle V. 1" ^tage. Four Children, and 

a Lamb, 
7, Salle V. 1* ^tage. Fead of Venus. 
11 ^ » Portrait of Selena 

Fourment, hi$ second Wife. 
13, SaUe Y. I*' ^tage. Large Landscape, 
19 „ „ View in a Park, 

21 „ „ Soly Family — 

Part of Betablo, No. 1. — And many 

others. 
29, Cabinet Blanc, I*' ^tage. Flowers, 
6, Salle II. Neer. I*' ^tage, Paysages. 

Wooded Landscape. 
29, Salle II. I*' ^tage. Landscape toiih 

Figures: 
28, Salle YI. Neer. 1«' ^tage. Soldiers 

Pillaging. 

4, Salle IV. Ital. !«* ^tage. Tobit and the 

Arelumgel, — ^Muoh injured. The only 
example among eeveral here which can 
be considered genuine : C. and G. 
9, Salle ni. ItaL 1*' ^tage. Mad(mna 
and Chad, 

15, Cabinet Blanc, I*' ^tage. Flowers. 

11, Cabinet Vert, I*' etage. Candlelight 
Scene. 

47, Salle I. Ital. X*' ^tage. Adoration of 
the Shepherds. 

19,. Salle VII. ItaL I*' ^tage. Holy FamOy, 

23, Salle L 2"' ^tage. Holy Family. 

66,. 67, Salle II. 2"' ^tage. Male and 
Female Portraits, 



374 



VJElfKA: THE BELVSDSRS. 



8igiiorelli;Uiio»<. . . 
Sirani, Elisabetta . . 



Snayen- 



Snyden, F. 



n 



Sodoma, II (Bazzi) . 
Steeii^Jaii . . . 



♦» ♦♦ 



Sustermans, J. . . • 
Teniera, J>aTid^.yo<inger. 



9^- 



♦♦- 



»»■• 



tr 



W • 



n 



>» 


» 


n 


99- 


r» 


n 


n 


99 


n 



♦» 



n- 



»♦•• 



Terburg, G. 
Tintoretto 



♦» 



Titian 



No. 

7, SaUe YU. ItaL I*' ^tage. Ad&rcHum. 
9i, BhWe y. Ital. l*" ^tage. Martha and 

Maty, 
56, Gabinet Vert, I*' ^tage. BaUU-pieee, 

— And others. 
27, Salle I. Neer. 1^ ^tage. Boar^urd, 
5j Salle in. Bez-de-ohanss^e, I*' ^tage. 

AfUmais, 
18, Salle rv. Ital. I*' ^tage. Holy FamUy. 
9,£!aUe TL Neer. 1" ^tage. FeataM 

Wedding. 
M, Salle VII. Neer. 1* ^tage. Interior. 

50, Salle I. Neer. I*' ^tage. An Old Woman. 
3, Sidle YI. Neer. !«" etage. FeoMtUi* 

Wedding. 

5, Si^e YI. Neer. l*" ^tage. Sacrifice of 

Ahrdkam. 
7, .Salle YI. Neer. l*" ^tage. Bfigmtd$ 

Fi9aging. 
10, Salle YI. Neer. 1«' ^tage. BuU^iei's 

shop, . . 

15, Sdile YI. IT^r. I*' ^tage. Interior. 
16» »» w 9i • Ketmem, 

W,. „. „ „ GaUery of 

Pictures. 
97,.8idle YI. Neer. I*' €tage. Dancing 

Feasants. 

51, Salle YI. Neer. l*" €tage. Fopular 

Festival at Brussels. • 
le, .Cabinet Yert, I*' ^tage. A Toung 

Woman peeling an Apple. 
44, Salle I. Ital. 1^ ^tage. PorirmU of am 

Old Man. 
53, Salle I. ItaL I*' ^tage. Chrisi hceuring 

the Cross. — And some portraits. 

6, SaUe I. ItaL I*' ^tage. AUegorieal 

Foftraiture. 
48, Salle I. ItaL I*' ^tage. Fi^rWait of a 
Venetian Lady. 



VimNA: TffS JBSLVEDISMK 



375 



Tilwn 



vt 






99 
99 



»» 



9» 



»♦ 



Talkenburg, tu de 
Yelas^nez, Diego 



» 



» 



» 



w 



» 



w 



99 



Portrait of 
The Young 
Pbrirait of 



ADanae, 
Portrait, 
¥urgin and 



No. 

17, Salle n. Ital. I*' ^tage. Diana ahd 

. OaBiOo. 
10, Salle n. Hal. I*' ^tage. Ecce Hdlno.-^ 

A large imposition, dated 1548. 
27, Salle II. Hal. 1* ^tage. . Portrait of 

ijUaoomo Strada. 
^ Salle XL Bal. I*" ^tage. 

l9aheaadl^E$U. 
aa, SaUe n. Ital. V ^tage. 

JeiaU at Prayer. 
89, SaUe n. Ital. V €tage. 

a Young Girl, 

86, Salle H. Ital. I*" j^tage. 

87, Salle II. Ital. V ^tage. 
89, Salle II. BaL V ^tage. 

ChOd with three Saints,— Eailjyrork 
and injtdred. . 

40, Salle U. Ital. I«' ^tage. Portrait 

41, Salle n. ItaL 1«' ^tage. Virgin and 

iC8kA(2.— Early. 
46, SaUe H. Hal. 1« ^tage. . PoftraU of 
John Fredericky Elector of Saaony, 

48, Salle 11. Ital. l*' ^tage. Portrait of 

Titian at 50 yean, 

59, Salle II. Ital. 1*' ^tage. AUegorieal 

Portraiture, 

60, Saile tl, Itdl. V ^ge. WonUtn taken 

in Adutt^, — ^Unfiiiiahed. 
64, Salle I^. Ital. I*' €tage. Holy Family, 

49, 50, 52, Satle HI. 2*^ ^tage.— And others. 
6, Salle TIL ItaL I*' ^tage. Baltaear 

Cdrhs ae a ChUd. 
118, dalle VIl. Ital. 1* ^tage. tnfanta 
Mdrgdritd Tereecu 

14, Salle Vn. Ital. 1* ^tage. The Family 

^fVeUugueK. 

15, SaUe TIL ItaL l^'^tage. InfantaMdria 

Terescu 
40, Salle TIL lid. 1« Aage; An Idiot, 



876 VIENNA: THE LIECHTENSTEIN, 

No. 
Yelasqnes, Diego . . 47, Salle YIL ItaL !«' ^tage. Infatda Maria 

Teresa. 
Yemet ..... 42, Salle II.Neer.l«'dtage. Ftetoo/JBotiM. 

VeroneM»P 84, Salle I. Ital. l*" €tage. JudUh. 

SO „ „ „ 8t. CfUhanw 

and 9ome Nuns before the Virgin. 
52, Salle L Ital I*' ^tage. Christ entering 

the House of Jairus. 
4, Salle L Bez-de-ohauss^. Adam a»d 
Eve after the Expulsion. — ^And others. 
Vivarini, Bart . . . 58, Salle II. Ital. I*' ^tage. Altar-piece in 

Jive pieces. 
Wattean, Antoine . . 20, Salle H. Rez-de-chanss^. A Young 

Man playing on the Guitar. 
Weyden, Bogier yan der 81, Salle L 2*' ^tage. BetaUo with two 

wings, Crucifixion in the centre. 
18, Salle n. 2*^ ^tage. Virgin and Child. 
22 „ „ St. Catharine. 

Wouwennan, Ph. . . 8, Salle YI. Neer. I*' ^tage. Landscape 

and Horses. 
Wynaati, J. . . . . 55, Salle II. Keer. I*' ^tage. Landscape. 



„ • • » . 



„ . • • 



„ . • • • 



» »> w 

n » » 



THE GALLERY OF PBINOB LIECHTENSTEIN 

AT YIENNA. 

In this large gallery of nearly 1500 pictures some yery fine worka 
exist, among a very large proportion which it is imnecessary to notice. 
They are distributed throughout numerous rooms, and it will be more 
convenient to follow the order of these than to arrange the few works 
to be named in alphabetical order. 

The Fqurf ob Pbinoipal Stobt. 

Boom I. contains works of a decorative and mythological clmracter, 
Nos. 1 to 18, by Marc Antonio Franoeschini (1648-1729). 



VIENNA: THE LIECHTENSTEIN. 



377 



Guido Beni . 

» »> ^ 
Moretto . . 

Gentile BeUini 

P. Peragino . 



Carlo Mamtta . . . 
Caravaggio, A. . . . 
Gorreggio, or Piooaooini ? 
Baphael, attribated to . 
G. Cagnaoci .... 
GaidoBeni . . . . 
» >» .... 
Bomeniohino .... 



P. P. Bubens . 



Van Dyok, Anton 



99 
» 

W 
>* 



** 

W 



Bubens, P. P. 
Hals, Frans . 



Bubens, P. P. 



» 
99 



Boom II, 
Ka 

19 8t. Jerome. 
28 Magdalen. 
84 JBbly Famay.'-%mBXL. 
85a ^JBecki. 
40 3fa<2onna and ChUd. 

Boom III. 

56 .Ba(A«%e6a. 
61 ThsLute^yer. 
65 Fmmm. 
67 Portrait 

74 Joood and Xa&an. 

75 Adoration of ths Shepherdi. 

76 Antiope and Jupiter. 

78 iSt&j/L — ^A replica or copy. 

Boom IV. 

89-94. jBMtory o/ ihe Death of the Consul 
• Veeiue. — Designs for tapestry, of 
which No. 91 is the finest. 

Boom V. 

115 Portrait of a. Lady. 

118 Portrait of WaUenOein. 

126 A Pieth. 

143 A Portrait of an Old Man. 

146 A POrtraU of an Old Lady. 

151 A Portrait of a Young Lady, — ^And 

others. 
— Several sketches and stadies. 
150 FulUlength Portrait. 

Boom VI. 

168 Aseumftion qf the Virgin. 
177 Male PortraU. 
191 Mythologiedi Sul^'ecL—Jjeigfi. 
194 Portraits of his two Sons^A replica is 
at Dresden. — And others. 



378 



VIENNA: TBE LIECHfENSTEW, 



Rembrandt yan Byn 



>» 



» 



w 



»» 



Dow, G. . . . . 
€telder, A. van . . 

Berchem, Nicholas • 



Garayaggio, Polidoro de 

Ganale, Ant. • • • 
Bellotti, Bernardo . 



Poussin, N. 



>» 



99 



Bassano, Jacopo . . 
Sirani, Elifiabetta . 



Es, Jacob yan 
Chardin, J. B. 



»» 



» 



» 



Terburg, G. 



Ganale, Ant. . . . 
Procacoini, Gesare . 
Poussin, N. . . . 



Berchem, Nicholas . 



»> 



» 



Van Dyck, Ant . . 
Poelenbnrg, 0. . . 



No. 

172 Diana and Endymion, 

173 Hi8 bwkl'ortrait when eld. 

174 Si$ own Pmirait when young. . 
176 Bit own Porfratf.— Life size. 
179 TmtraU ^ a Yowng. itfan. 

JSoom YIt, 
216 JDeaQtofJHdo, 

Th> Skqond Stobt. 
Boom I. 
278 Gopj in grey, of Baphart's 
Family in th^ Louvre. 
, 283-286. Vietm in Venice, 
289 View in Pima, 

Boom IL 

307 The Flight into Egypt, 
330 The Saeriflee of Noah, 
314 The Shepherd and Flocks, 
339, 342. Cupids, 

Boom VI, 

553 A Fruit-piece, 

557 Mol^ar and her 8on, 

65S A Oook, 

559 A Cook, 

560 A Cook, 

, 562 FortraU of W, Mariemhwrg. 
5eS PortraUofMs Wife. 

Boom VII, 

620-622. Views in Venice, 

621 Angels, 

637 Sol% FamUy,— And others. 

Boom VIIL 
671 Judgment of Paris. 
781 A Landscape. — ^And other». 
698,766. Two studies. 
723 Landscape. 



E^ 



\< 



VIENNA: IME LUSCHTENSTEIN, 



379 



Dosart, Com. 
Buysdael, Jacob . 
Jordaens, Jacob . 
Tenitfn, David, 
younger . . 



the 



HayBnin, JaB Tsan 
Teniers, David, the 
younger . . . . 



»» 



Duoq^ A. le . . . 
Ryckaert, David . . 
Ostade, Adrian van . 
Ruydch^ Bachel . . 
Mignon, Ab. . . . 



Eeckiiocit, O. van den . 
Bembrandt , » . . 



Holbein, younger, attri- 
buted to .... 

Brueghel, Jan . . . 

Orley, B. van, attributedl^ 
to / 



Hondeooeter . 



» 



Fyt, Jan . . . 
Heem, J. D. de . 
WeemXjJi^n . . 



Bottenhammer, J. . . 
Jardin, Karel du . . 



Le Brun, 0. . • 



No. 

760 Peasants. 

761 Landscape. 

778 Satyrs and Animals. 

780 Peasant playing {he Gidtar. 

Boom IX. 
821, 82i. Flcwer-pieoes. 

822 Peasants playing Cards. 

823 At an Inn. — ^And others. 
827 An Adventure. 

883 PaHy with Mime. 
862 Peasants Dancing. 
878, 880. Flower-pieces. 
891 Frmt. 

MoomX, < 

9^ A Soydl Bepast. 
932 A Cahn Sea. 

Boom XI. 

1«43 A PortfO^. 
1052 Landscape. 

1112, 1114. Side Panels of an Altar-piece, 
with Donators, 

Boom XII. 

1151 Domeeiie PomUry. 

1159 Cocks Fighting. 

1158^ 1163, 1167. Live and Dead Game. 

1168, 1170. Fruit-pieces. 

1180,1135,1187. Dead Cans. 

Aoom Xin. 

1239 Feast of the Gods. 
125^ Wooded Landscape, 

B^emXVL 
1896^ PortraU of an Admind. 



-J 



1. 



vl 



880 



MADBID: SAN FBSNANBO. 



THE PICTUEE GALLEKIES OP SPAIN. 



ACADEMIA DE SAN FERNANDO, HADBID. 

No. 
Gino, AloDBO . . , . — A Crucifixion, 
Morales, Luis de . . — A Pieta, 

Mmillo — The Queen Elizabeth of Hungary attmd 

ing to the Sick and Poor, 

M — The Virgin and Child appearing to th 

Sleeping Boman. 

„ — A Female Praying. 

Bibera, Joee .... — SL Jerome and a Pendant 

M „ . . . . — Head of John the Baptiet in a Dish, 
Zurbaran — Five tingle Figures of Monke, 



THE BOYAL HUSEUH AT MADBID. 
Oatalooub of 1876. 



Angelico, Fra 
Bassano, Jaoopo . 



w 



♦» 



» 



» 



Francesco 
Ijeandro 



w 



Bellini, Giovanni 

Bles, Hendrik de 
Bosch .... 
Bmegbel, Pieter, elder . 
Jan (Velours). 



n 



99 



M 



No. 

14 The Annuneiation. 

22 The Covenant made to Adam hy Ood, 

23 The AnimaU entering the Ark, 
89 The Adoration offheKinge. 
45 The Prodigal Son, 

52 The Forge of VuUsan. 

00 Virgin and ChUd with two SainU, 
Injured. 
1171 Triptyeh.-'&maM, 
1175 Adoration of the F^nge, 
1221 The Triumph of Death, 
1233 The Four MemenU. 
1245 Landioapef tftc . 



MADBID: THE MUSEUM, 



S81 



Brueghel, Jan (Y elouni) . 



» 



» 



»» 



»» 






CSano, Alonao . 



n 



»» 



»» »» • • • 

Garrefio de Mixanda . 



w 



>» 



Oax^s, Eugenio . . 

Ghristnsy Petrus . . . 
GQrrea,D. . . . . 
Gorreggio (Ant. Allegri) 
Dughet, Ghwpar (Fous- 

8in> 

Purer, Albreobt . . . 



n 



»> 



Dyck, Anton van - . 



»» 


» 


>* 


n 


» 


n 


>» 


n 


» 


** 


»» 


n 


» 


9T 


>» 


n 



n 



Essen, Jacob yan 

Eyck, Jan yan . 
Falcone, Aniello . 
Fyt, Jan . . . 

>» w • • • 



No. 

1277 Bwbie FetuL 

1278 BttsUc Fead. 

1279 Landscape in HoUand,^Ajxd others. 
668 San Benito in Meditation, 

670 Virgin adoring the Infani Christ. 
672 Dead Christ and Angd, 
690 FuOAengOh Male Portrait 
692 Portrait of the Bujfoim of Charles II, 
697 Disembarkation of the English at 
Cadiz, • 

1291 An Annunciation, 

2154 Death of the Virgin, 
132 Noli me tangere, 

151<-155. Landscapes, 

1314 Adam. 

1315 Eve. 

1816 His own Portrait 

1319 The Crowning with Thorns, — A copy 

with alterations, of Titian's picture 
at Munich, No. 1329. 

1320 Portrait of David Byckaert 

1322 Portrait of the CotMtess of Oxford, 

1325 Portrait of Charles L on Horsebai^, 

1326 Portrait of a Lady. 

1327 Portrait of Count Henry de Berg. 

1328 Portrait of a Musician. 

1329 Male Portrait 

1330 Portrait of Van Dyck and the Count 

of Bristol. 

1331 Portrait of Henry LiberU, Organist 

of Antwerp. 
1335 The Betrayal of Christ. 

1346 StiU-life. 

1347 StiOrlife. 

2188 The THwn^h of Christianity. 
157 Combat between Turks and Christians. 
1369 Dead Game. 
ISflO SiiU-Ufe. 



882 



MADBID: THE MUSmTM. 





No. 


Fyt,Jaii . . . 


. . 1371 JBdn$ pwsuedhy J}og$i, 


»»»••• 


. . 1872 WOdFowL 


»»»••• 


. . 1373 Dead Game and Fruit, 


Gel^, daude (Loncaine) 1989 Lanuheape wUft. an AnehonL 


>9 »f 99 


1991 Landicapehy MoonUght. 


99 99 99 


1992 Landscape unih a Magdalen, 


Giordano, Looa • 


. . — Several attributed to him. 


Gioigione, attadbated to . 236 Mkdonna and Child wUh 8t, Bridget 




and anoOier- Saint.^—TblB is an early 




Titian. 


Goya 7 Tiucientes 


. . 7Sl EqueHrian PoHrait of Gharie$ IV. 


99 99 


. . 734 Bpuode during the Frefuih Inmukn. 


99 99 


. . 7B5 SpUode during the French IfnoMUm. 


99 99 


. . 738 Portroift of DoiUk Maria Luim. 


99 99 


. . 2164 Portrait^/ Fernando Fii.— Yomigi 


99 99 


. . 2165 The Otiei/Ictbn.— Designs far tspesiiy 




in &e Sala de Goya ; and others. 


Guercino .... 


. . 2i9 Suaammk^ the Bath. 


99 • . . - 


. . 2&^ Diana, 


Guido Belli . . 


. . 269 Ifte Virgin offhe ^ SiOa,'' 


99 99 • • 


, , ^mSt. aebastian. 


99 99 • • 


. . 2ftl TheApoiOeSanU/tgo. 


Haarlem, Gornelis reai . 1390 Tk^ TrUbumdoflhe Oodt^ 


Heem, Jan David^de 


, 1391 Fruiti 


99 99 


. 1392 Fruits 


Joanes, Vieentede 


, . 754 Male Portrait 


99 99 


. . 755 The LaH Supper, 


99 99 


. . 758 Coronati^ of the.Virgin. 


99 99 


, .. 159 EeeeHotM, 


99 99 


. . 760 EooeHomo. 


Jocdaens, Jaobb . . 


, 1404 The Judgment of Soloman. 


99 99 


. . 1405 The Marriage of St, Cathanne. 


99 99 • " 


, 1407 MeUager and Atdlanta. 


99 99 • ' 


. . 1410 ^diii% Group, 


Lotto, Lorenzo . 


. . 288 Portraits of MardUo and his Bride, and 




aOUpid, 


I^uini, Bevp«;dina . 


. 290 Molff Ftmihf, 


99 99 


. .291 The Hauqkter of Hei^iae. . 


Mantegna, Andrea . 


. 2Q^ The Deaih/i^ like Virgin^ 



MAJDBIB: THE MUSEUM, 



888 







No. 


Mazo, J. 


B. del . . 


. 788 View of Zamgosa. 


» 


99 • 


. 790 iV^t^ of Dona Maria ofAmtria.-^ 
, And others. 


Mengs, Antgn Baphael. . Iid5 Adorti^ion^ of the Shepherda. — And 






othera. 


Mignard, Pierre . . 


. 2021, 2023, 2024, 2025. PortnUti. 


Morales, Luis de . . 


. 817 JEoee Homo. 


» 


»» • • 


, . 848 Grieving Virgin. 


Moro, Antonio . . 


. 1483 BortraiL 


»» 


99 • • 


. 1484 Portrait of Queen Mary. 


» 


99 


. 1487 Portrait of MaximiUan IT. 


- M 


99 • • 


. 14^ Portrait of a Lady. 


Murillo, Esteban 


. . 86i JEMy Family '' dd Pagarito:* 


w 


99 « 


. 855 Jfebeeea at the Well 


>» 


99 


, . 859 Jdoratiim of the Shepherds. 


» 


99 

r 


. . 861 Cbrid and Virgin and St. Francis-- 
•* La Poreiuneida:' 


99 


99 


. . 864 J^oMi drist. 


» 


99 


. . 8^ The ChM St. John. 


» 


». 


. . 866 Jesus and St. Johnr^^'Los Niiios de la 
Concha:* 


>* 


99 


, . 867 Jmwneiaiion. 


»» 


99 


, . 868 Appearance of the Virgin to St. Bernard. 


»> 


99 


. . 869 Aj^^earanec of the Virgin to St. lUe- 
fpmo. 


M 


>» 


, . 9J0 The Virgin '' of the Bosary,'' 


M 


99 


. . 878 il Coneepden. 


>» 


99 . 


. . 879 A.Coneepeien. 


•» 


99 


. . 880 AQmc^pcien. 


99 


»> 


. . 890 San Francisco de Paula. 


» 


n 


. . 895 Ecce Eame^ 


♦» 


99 


. . 896 Virgim de.lQs Voiores. 


Nayarrete (El Mndo] 


) . 905 The BapHsn of Christ. 


99 


9» 


. ^ The ApceOe Paul. 


»> 


99 


. 9Q7 TheApocOe Paul. 


Neeffl, Pieter, the eU 


ler . 5^ I^i^riortfa Churoh in Flanders. 


» 


99 99 


. 501 ^ Interior. of a Gothic Chureh. 


Pachecc 


K Francisco 


. . 9iL6T^9. 8ing\B Figures of Saints. 


Pareja, 


Juande . 


. . 9^^Thfi€attmQofSt.MaUhew. 



884 



MADRID: THE MU8SUM. 





No. 


Parmegianino (Fnmo. 


Maaszaola) . . 


. . 383 Portrait Group. 


Patinir, J. . . 


. . 1519 Begt after the Flight into Egypt. 


w • • 


. . 1528 TempiaHon of 8t, AwOumy, 


Peetera, CSara . 


. . 1526-1529. Studies 0/ SfHirlife. 


Pordenone (Gioy. A 


Jit. 


RegiUo) . . 


. . 842 ^ Portrait. 


Poussin, Nicolas . 


. . 2048 Mount PamoMus^, 


♦» n • 


. . 2051 The Cha$e of Mdeager, 


Baphael Sanzio . 


. . 864 Hcly Farnity « del Cordero:^ 


>» »> 


. . 3&i The Virgin ''del Pez" or ''of the Fish 


n »» 


. . 866 Christ hearing the Cross—" El Pam 




de Sidliar 


» M • 


. . 868 I^ Visitation. 


w >♦ • 


. . 869 Holy FamHy " la Perla^ 


W M • 


. . 870 Holy Family " la Bosa." 


»» »» • 


. . 871 Holy Family " del Lagarto.** 


Kembrandt . . . 


, . 1544 Queen Artemisia. 


Bibalta, Francisco dc 


> . 947 8t. Francis of Assisi. 


Bibera, Jose de . . 


. 956,959,968,978. Single Heads. 


>» >» • • 


. 977 St. Bartholomew. 


»» »» • • 


. 982 JaSob*s Dream. 


» »» • • 


. 988 Isaac Uessing Jacob. 


w » • • 


. 989 Martyrdom of St. Bartholomew. 


w »> • • 


. 1006 A Hermit at Prayer. 


Boelas, Juan de las . 


. 1021 Moses and the Bitter Waters. 


Bubens, P. P. . . 


. 1558 The Brazen Serpent. 


>» 


. 1559 Adoration of the Kings. 


»» • • 


. 1560 Hdy Family. 


>» • • 


. 1561 Holy Family. 


»» 


. 1565 St. Oeorge and the Dragon. 


»» • • 


. 1566 Legend of Boddph of Hapsburg. 


»» • • 


. 1569 Portrait. 


>» * • 


. 1588 AtaUmta and Meleager. 


»> • • 


. 1584 Perseus and Andromeda, 


»< . • 


. 1585 Ceres and Pom&na. 


»> • • 


. 1590 Judgment of Paris, 


w • • 


. 1598 Ceres and Pan. 


ft 


r 159^ Mercury and Argos, 



MADRID: THE MUSEUM. 



385 



Bubens, P. P. 



»» 



Kyckaert, David 
Sanchez, Coello Alonso . 



♦♦ 



jj 



»» 



♦1 



9» 



»» 



Sarto, Andrea del 









Sebastiano del Piombo . 



»» 



»> 



Snyders, Frans . . . 

»> »» • • • 

Teniers, Dayid, younger 



»» 


»» 




»» 


»♦ 


»» 




♦> 


»> 


»» 




i» 


J» 


»* 




j» 


5> 


n 




»> 


»> 


5» 




»» 


Tintoretto 


• 




• • 


»» 


• 




• • 


»» 


• 




• • 


»> 


• 




• • 


»> 


• 




• • 


'»» 


• 




• • 


»» 


• 




• • 


Titian . . 


• 




• • 



No. 

1606 FemdU Portrait 

1607, 1608. Equestrian PortraUe. 

1609 Portrait of Sir Thomas More. 

1610 Portrait of a French Princess. 

1611 The Garden of Love. 

1612 Peasants* Dance. 

1613 Copy of Titian's Adam and Eve. 

1614 Copy of Titian's Europa. 
1657 The Alchemist. 

1032 Portrait of Prince Carlos. 

1033 Portrait of the Infantaj sister of Prince 

Carlos, 
1036 Fefmale PoHrait. 
383 Portrait of the Painter's Wife. 
385 Holy Family and Angel. 
. 387 The Sacrifice of Abraham. — Repetition 
of that in the Gallery of Dresden, 
No. 44. 
884, 388. Holy Families. 

395 Jesm hearing the Cross. 

396 The Descent of Christ to Limbo. 
1677 Dogs and Eatables. 

1684 Frmt and Eatables. — And others. 

1721 A Feast 

1724 A Soldier Drinhin^. 

1726 Smokers in an Inn. 

1730 The Feast of Kings. 

1732 Interior of a Kitchen. 

1744 Soldiers and Armour. 

1754 The Temptation of St Anthony. 

410 Large BaMe-piece. 

411 Portrait of Sebastiano Ventero. 

412 MaU Portrait 

413 The Baptism of Christ 
419 Male Portrait 

428 Sketch for the * Paradise * in the Ducal 

Palace^ Venice. 

429 Male Portrait 
450 The Bacoliandlia. 

2 



386 



MADBID: THE MUSEUM. 



■LAVlCw&A • 


• 


• « 




1* 


»♦ 






>» 


>» 






>» 


»> 






»» 


»» 






») 


»» 








»» 






»> 


»» 






•• 


>» 






»» 


» 






»♦ 


w 






»» 


»» 






»»• 


» 






»» 


» 






»» 


»> 






»» 


»> 






» 


»» 






>» 


>» 






>» 


>» 






>» 


>» 






»» 


»» 






» 


» 




att] 


buted to 


. 






Tobar, Alonso 






Yalentin, Mo'ise . 




Yalkenburg 


i < 




Velasqnez 


da Silya . 


>» 




»» • 


»» 




»» • 


»» 




»» • 


»» 




»> • 


>» 




n • 


»» 




»» • 


»» 




i 

n • 


>» 




» • 


M 




M 


• 



•} 



No. 

451 TA« Fea«< o/ Feniw. 

452 Portrait of Alfonso. 

453 FttO-length Portrait of Charles V. 

454 FtOUength PoHrait of Philip 11. 

455 Venus and Adonis. 

456 Adam and Eve, 

457 Equestrian Portrait of Charles V. 

458 JDanoe. 

459, 460. Two examples of the ' Venus* 

461 Salome with the Head of the Baptist.- 

His daughter Lavinia. 

462 The Trinity and Heavenly Hosts. 

463 Portrait of a Knight of Malta. 

464 An Entombment. 

467 Ecce Homo. 

468 La Dolorosa. 

469 St. Margaret. 

470 An AUegory loiih Portraits of Philip . 

and his Son. 

475 La Dolorosa. 

476 Beligion succoured py Spain. 
4m His own Portrait. 

487 Christ hearing tfte Cross. 

465, 466. Sisyphus and Prometheus 

Copies by S. Goello. 
1044 Portrait <ff MuriUo. 
2075 The Martyrdom of St. Lauorence. 
1788 View of a Palace in Brussels. 

1054 Adoration of the Kings. 

1055 Christ on the Cross. 

1056 Coronaiion of the Virgin. 

1057 St. Antony with St. Paul. 

1058 Los BorraahoSf or the Drinkers. 

1059 The Forge of Vulcan. 

1060 The Surrender of Breda, ** las Lanza 

1061 Las Hilandercu, or the Tapest 

workers. 

1062 Las Meninas, or the Maids of Honour 
1066 Equestrian Portrait of Philip IV. 



MADBID: THE MUSEUM. 



387 



Velasquez da Silva . 



»» 



»» 



»» 
>» 
»> 
»» 
»» 



No. 

1067 Equedrian Portrait of Queen Isabella of 

Bourbon, 

1068 Portrait of Prince BaUasar Carlos, 

1069 Equestrian Portrait of the Duke of 

Olivares. 

1073 Portrait of D. Carlos as a Boy. 

1074 PoHrait of Philip IV. 

1075 Portrait of D. Fernando of Austria. 

1076 Portrait of Baltasar Carlos. 

1078 Portrait of Doila Mariana of Austria, 
1080 Head of Philip IV, 

1083 Portrait of Baltasar Carlos, 

1084 Bofla Maria Teresa of Austria. 
1086 PoHrait of the Wife of Velasquez. 

1090 Male Portrait. 

1091 Portrait of a Sculptor. 

1092 Portrait of a Man. 

1095 P<yrtrait of a Dwarf of Philip IV. 

1096 PortnoLit of a Dwarf of Philip IV. 

1097 Portrait of a Dwarf of Philip IV. 

1098 El Nino de VaUecas, 

1099 ElBobode Coria, 

1100, 1101. JEsop and Menipus, 
1106 View in the Garden Villa Medici, 
1108 View in Borne, — And others. 
— Several. 

526 Venus and Adonis. 

527 Christ among the Doctors, 

528 Jesus and the Centurion. 

531 Virgin and Child vjith Saints, 
533 Moses saved from the Waters. 
544 Portrait of a Young Lady, 

2083 Fite ChampStre, 

2084 Fete in St Cloud, 

2189-2193. Triptych, Crucifixion in the 
centre panel, and the Last Judgment 
and Expulsion of Adam and Eve on 
the wings. 

1120 VisimofSan Pedro Nolaseo. 



>» 




»» 




»» 




»♦ 




»» 




»» 




>» 




»» 




»» 




»» 




»» 




»» 




>» 


»» 


»» 




*> 


» 


»» 


»» 


s» 


»» 


»» 




»» 




»» 


»> 



»> 



>» 



Yemet, Claude 'Joseph 
Veronese, Paolo 



» 

>» 



Watteau, A. . 

ft 
Weyden, Bogier v. der 



Zurbaran, Frandsoo de 



388 



SEVILLE: TEOE MUSEUM, 



Zurbaran, Francisco de 









No, 

. 1121 A^ppecarance of St Peter to San Vedro 

NolasctK 
. 1122-1181. History of Hercules. 
. 11^ Sleeping Jesus, 



THE PROVINCIAL MUSEUM AT SEVILLE. 
Catalogue of 1876. 

No. 

Cano, Alonso. . . . Si Souls in Purgatory. 
Herrera, Fraucisco, el 

Viejo — Several works. 

Herrera, Frauciuco, el 

Mozo ..... — Several worlos. 

Murillo 45 St. Joseph and the Child Jesus, 

52 Virgin and Child *'de la ServiUetar 

, 53 St. Felix and the Child Jesus. 

„ ..... 55 A Concepdon, 

„ ..... 59 The Virgin and St. Augustine. 

„ ^^ St. Antony and the Child Jesus, 

,, 68 J. Concepdon. — Colossal. 

„ 83 S8. Leandro and Bonaventwra, 

„ 84 jS^ Thomas of ViUanueva distributin 

Alms, 

„ 88 Christ on the Cross and St, Francis. 

„ 90 Virgin and Child with St. Felix. 

„ ^2 St. Anthony of Padua with the Child. 

,, 93 ^ Concepdon, 

95 SS. Justa and Bufina, 

„ 96 J.n AmMmdation. 

Pax^heco, Francisco de . 16 Legend of San Pedro Nolasco, 

Boeks, Juan de las . 89 Martyrdom of St, Andrew. 

Vasquez, Alonso ... 26 Maartyrdom of San Serapio. 

„ „ ... 27 St. Pedro N, redeeming the Captives. 

Zorbaran 1 T%e Apotheods of St, Thomas Aquinas, 

„ 7, 8. Single Saints, 

„ A& St, Bruno conferring with the Pope. 

„ &7 St. Hugo and the Carthusians. 

„ 74 Virgin and Carthusians. 



VALENCIA: THE MUSEUM. 



889 



THE MUSEUM AT VALENCIA. 



Oano, Alonso . . 
Dolci, Carlo . 
Espinosa, Jacinto 



n 



»> 



Juanes, Vicente 



»♦ 



>» 



Bibalta, Francisco de 



>♦ 



»> 



»> 



»» 
Juan de 
Ribera, Jose . . 



»♦ 



No. 

— Infant Christ * 

— A Magdalen. 

— 8t. Louis of Tohsa. 

— St. Peter Pasqiml. 

— Holy Famity, 

— A Cena, 

— 2W Portraits of El Salvador. 

— St. Francis and Christ on the Cross. 

— Assumption of 'the Virgin. 

— San Bruno. 

— A Crucifixion. 

— Martyrdom of St. Sebastian, 



890 LYONS: THE BHJSEUM. 



THE PICTUKE GALLERIES OF FRANCE. 



THE MUSEUM AT BORDEAUX. 

The only work of any importance is by 

No. 
Perugino , . . . — An AUar-piece. 



THE MUSEUM IN THE HOTEL DE VILLE AT CAEN. 

The only work of any importance is by 

No. 
Perugino ..... — The Marriaga of the Virgin. 



THE MUSEUM AT LILLE. 

No. 

BubenB 809 DetiOi of the Magdalen. 

„ 310 Virgin and 8t. Francis, 

Van Eyck . . . . — A Crucifixion. 



THE MUSEUM AT LYONS. 

No printed catalogue exists of this Museum. The following 

notes were made in 1876. 

No. 
Brueghel, Jan (Velours) 89,90,91,92. The Four El&ments. 
Champaigne, Philippe de 105 Finding the Relics of 8. Oervais. 
Ouyp, Albert .... 212 Nature Morte. 
Huysum, Jan van . .150 Fruity &c, 

Perugino, Pietro . . . 155 8t, James and 8t Oregory.—A wing of 

some larger work. 



MONTPELLIEB: TEE MUSjSE FABBE. 301 

No. 
f^eragino, Pietro • • • 156 Ateermony with the Virgin and ApodUs, 

— The predella of this is in tte 
Museum at Bouen. 
IBubens, P. P. . . .82 St, Francis and Saints protecting ffe« 

World from the Vengeance of Christ. 
„ ... 83 Adoration of the Ma^i, 

Snyders, F 85 Dead Game, 

Teniers, D., younger . 117 Deliverance of St Peter, 

Terburg, G 115 The Messenger, 

Veronese, P 177 Adoraiion, — Others here attributed fo 

him are doubtful works. 
There are many admirable Dutch flower-paintings in this Museum, 
exceeding in number and condition what are generally found in a col- 
lection of this size. 

THE GALLERY AT MARSEILLES. 

The only work of any importance is by 

No. 
Perugino — A Virgin and Saints. 



THE MUS^E FABRE AT MONTPELLIER. 
Catalogue of 1866. 

No. 

Chardin 79 Portrait of Madame Oeoffrin. 

Dow, G 131 The Mousetrap, 

Dughet, G. (Poussin) . 203, 204, and others. 
Greuze 241 Oirl at Prayer. 

„ 246 Head. — ^And other examples. 

Hondecoeter, M. . . . 273 Hen and Chickens, 
Huysmans .... 275, 275a. Landscapes. 
Metsu, G 327 The Writer. 

„ .... 328 Fishvooman, 

Mieris, F. le Vieux . . 334 Qenre Scene. 
Poussin, Nicolas ... — Several. 
Raphael, attributed to . 404 Port/rait of Lorenzo di Medici. 



392 PABIS: THE LOUVRE. 



No. 
Baphael, attributed to . 405 Fortrait of a Young Man. 
Beynolds, Sir Joshua . 416 ChUd Samuel at Prayer, 
Bosa, Salyator . . . 486 Landscape. 
Steen, Jan .... 456 Family Growp, 
Teniera, D., younger . 480 Group of Smokers. 
„ „ . 481 C^nre Scene. 

Terburg, G 482 Qirl Seated^ pouring out Wine, 

Wouwerman, P. . . . 524 Landscape. 

„ ... 527 Landscape. 

Wynants, Jan . . . 531 Landscape. 



THE MUS^E [BEBNABD is a valuable collection of Dutch and 
modem pictures and numerous copies presented to the town of Lyons 
in 1875, and at present (October 1876) without a catalogue. 

The following list contains the names of the principal masters 
representcMl here : 



Berchem, Nicholas. 

Brekelenkamp. 

Brueghel, Jan (Velours). 

Brouwer. 

Ghardln. 

Dusart, C. 



Qoyen, Van. 

Netscher. 

BuysdaeL 

Schalken. 

Wouwerman. 

Zoorg. 



AL»o a few French works by Descamps and Lancret. 



THE GALLEBY OP THE LOUVBE AT PABIS. 

Catalogue op 1876. 

FiBST Past. — Italian School and Spanish School, 

No. 
Albani, Francesco . . 1 The Eternal Father. — Small. 

2 The Annunciation. 
. . . 1 1 The Cupids Disarmed. 
„ „ ... 12 Adonis and Ventu and Cupufo. 



»» »» 



PABI8: THE LOUVRE. 



893 



\lbam, Francesco . . 

\lbertinelli, Mariotto . 

^ori, Cristofano . . 
^Innno, Niccolo . 

Angelico, Fra . . 

A.n8elini, Michael Angelo 

Antonello da Messina . 



Barocci, F. . . 

91 

Bartolommeo, Fra 

Bassano, Jacopo . 

»> »» • 

Bellini, Gentile . 



)f 



>» 



» 



No. 

14 The Triumph of Cyhele. — And others. 

24 St. Jerome adoring the Virgin and ChUd. 

30 Isabella of Aragon before Charles VIII, 

31 Six Scenes from the Life of Christ. 
214 The Crowning of the Virgin. 

42 Virgin and Child with Saints, 
— A Heady without number, in the Salon 
Carr€. 

60 bis. The Cireumcision, 

61 Virgin and Child in Glory with Saints. 

64 The Salutation, 

65 The Marriage of St. Catharine. 
301 The Marriage at Cana, 

303 The Entombment. 

68 Reception of Venetian Ambassador at 

Constantinople, 

69 Portraits of Qiovamni and Oentile 

Bellini, 
69 bis. Virgin amd Child with two Saints, 
71 Virgin and Child toith Donators, 

82 Holy Family with Magdalen and 

Saints. 

83 Virgin, Child, St, John^ and Saints, 

89 Male Portrait, 

90 bis. The Presentation in the Temple, 
196 Virgin^ Child, and St, John, 

94 Mcde Portrait, 
116 John the Baptist, 

113 View of San Salute, 

118 Bepose of the Holy Family. 

136 The Virgin of the " Cherry.'* 

137 Infant Christ asleep toith Virgin, 

138 The Virgin appearing to St. Luke. 
140 Dead Christ, 

147 St, Sebastian, 

149 Diana and Callisto, 

151 The Fishing. 

152 The Hunting.— And others. 



Giovanni 
Beltraffio . . . 
Bonifazio . . . 



y» 



Bordone, Paris 
Borgognone, Ambrogio . 
Botticelli, Sandro 
Bronzino, Angelo 
Gagnacci, Guide . 
Ganale, Antonio (Gana- 

letto) . . . 
Gantarini . 
Garacci, Annibale 



>»• 
» 



394 



PABI8: THE LOUVER 



Garaoci, Lodovico . . 
Caravaggio (Amerighi) . 



» 



»♦ 



>» 



t* 



Garpacoio, Yittore . 



» 



ff 



Gimabue .... 
Oonegliano, Gima da 
Gorreggio (Allegri) . 



»» 



»> 



Gosta, Lorenzo . . . 
Gredi, Lorenzo di . . 
Domenichino, Zampieri . 



» 

11 

11 
It 



*i 
11 
»» 
11 
11 



Dofisi, Dosso . 
Ferrari, Gkiudenzio . 
Feti, Domenico . . 
Francia, Francesco (Bai- 
bolini) .... 



n 
11 



Gaddi, Taddeo . 
Garofalo (Tisio) . 



11 



11 



Ghirlandajo, Domenico . 
Giordano, Luca . . . 



11 



li- 



lt 



11 



Giorgione (Barbarelli), 
attributed to . . 



M 



No. 

126 Virgin and Child. 

33 The FoHune-teUer. 

34 A Concert. 

35 Portrait of the Grand Master of MaUa. 
121 St. Francia. 

123 St. Stephen preaching at •TiertwoZem.— 
Injured. 

174 Virgin with Angels. 

173 Virgin and Child with Saints. 

27 Mystic Marriage of St. Catharine. 

28 Antiope Asleep. 

175 Court of Isabella d^Este. 

177 Virgin and Child with Saints. 

489 Adam and Eve. 

490 David playing the Harp, 

493 The Ecstasy of St. Paul, 

494 St. Cecilia. 

498 The Triumph of Love. 

499 Benaud and Armid. — ^And others. 
185 Holy Family.— Small. 

190 St. Paul in Meditation. 
193 Figure of Melancholy, 

318 Portrait of a Man» 
318 bis. A Naiivity. — Small. 
318 ter. The Crucifixion, — Injured by resto- 
ration. 
199 PredeUa in three parts. 
418, 419, 420. Small works. 
421 Virgin and Child. — And others. 
204 The Visit of Mary to Elizabeth. 

206 The Presentation in the Temple. 

207 Virgin, Child, Angels, and the Eternal 

Father. 

208 Mars and Venus. — Small. 

43 Holy Family toith Saints and Donator.— 

Probably by Pellegrini da San 
Daniele : G. and G. 

44 Bustio Concert, 



TABIS: THE LOUVRE. 



395 



lotto da Bondone 
ozzoli, Benozzo . 
uardi, Francesco 









uercino (Barbieri) 



»» 






I'lngegno (And. Luigi) . 
lippi, Fra Filippo 

lotto, Lorenzo . 
iiiini, Bernardino 

» »» 

>» »» 

>» >» 

[antegna, Andrea 



»> 



» 



>» 



»> 



» 



»» 



[aratta, Carlo . 
[ola, Pietro Franc. 



»» 



»» 



>» 



[oretto (Bonvicino) 



»> 



»» 



alma (Yecohio) . 
almezzano, Marco 
Forti) . . . 
anini, Giovanni. 



»> 



»» 



» 



>f 



(de' 



erugino, II (Yannuooi), 
attributed to . . . 



No. 
209 St, Francis of Assiai. 

72 Triumph of St. Thomas Aquinas. 
220 Doge going in State to the Salute, 

224 Doge going in State to St, Zacharias, 

225 Interior of a Boom in the Ducal Falace, 

— ^And others. 
46 Lot and his Daughters. 
48 The Resurrection of Lazarus, 
55 Virgin and Child with the Pairon-Saint 

of Modena. 

57 Circe. 

58 His own Portrait. 
60 St, Cecilia. 

37 Hdy Family. 

233 A Nativity. 

234 Madonna and Child with Saints, 
238 bis. St. Jerome in the Desert, 

240 Holy Family. 

241 Infant Christ asleep tmth the Virgin. 

242 Salome with the Head of the Baptist. 

— Several good frescoes in a room adjoin- 
ing the Salon Carr^. 

249 Christ between the Two Thieves. 

250 The Madmna of ''Victory:* 

251 The Parnassus. 

252 Expulsion of the Vices. 
257 Female Portrait. 

271 St. John the Baptist Precuihing. 

272 Vision of St, Bruno, 

85 Two Saints, 

86 Two Saints. 

277 Adoraiion of the Shepherds. 

277 bis. A Dead Chnst, 

285 Interior of St, Peter's at Rome. 

286 Concert given at Rome, &c. 

287 Piaaza Narona at Rome. 

442 Virgin and Child with Saints. 



896 



TABI8: THE LOUVBE. 



Pemgino, II (Vannuoci), 
attributed to . 



>» 



Piero di Gosimo . 
Pietro da Gortona 



» 



»» 



» 



»» 



»f »> 

Pintoricchio, Bernardino 

Piombo, Sebastiano del . 

Pontormo (Garacci) . 

Procaccini, G. G. . . 

Baffaellino del Garbo . 

Baphael Sanzio . 



»» 
»» 
»» 
>» 
»» 
>» 

)) 






Beni, Guido 



>» 
>» 
>» 
>» 
»» 



» 
»» 
»> 
»» 
»» 



Bioci, Sebastiano 



»» 



»» 



Biccio, Felioe 
Bomano, Giulio 



» 



)) 



Bosa, Salvator 



» 



9> 



No. 



443 Virgin and Child toith Saints. 
445 Fight between Love and Chaftity, 

291 The Coronation of the Virgin, 
74 The Birth of the Virgin, 

76 Holy Family. 

77 Virgin and Child and St, Martine, 
79 Dido and Mnea*, — ^And others. 

292 Virgin and Child. 

239 Visitation of the Virgin, 
158 Portrait of a Man. 
317 Virgin and ChUd and Saints. 
200 Coronation of the Virgin. 

375 Madonna and ChUdj ^la &eZ2e Ja\ 

diniere.** 

376 Virgin regarding the Sleeping Jesus. 

377 Holy Family. 

380 Saint Michad.—SmB,\[. 
881 SadiU George. — Small. 

382 St, Michael overthrovjing the Dragon, 

383 Portrait of BaZthasar Ca^tiglione. 

384 Portrait of the Princess of Aragon.- 

Ghiefly by Giulio Bomano. 

385 Portrait of a Yottng Man.. 

386 Portrait Group. 

328 Ecee Homo. 

329 The Magdalen, 

330 A Magdalen. 
832 St, Sebastian. 

336 Combat of Hercules. 

337 Nesms and Dejanira. 

339 The Bape of Helen. — And others. 

345 Polyxenes before the Tomb of AohiUes. 

346 The Continence of Scipio. 
348 A Holy Family. 

293 The Nativity. 

295 Triumph of Titus and of Vespasian. 

360 A large Battle-piece. 

361 A Landscape, 



TARI8: THE LOUVRE. 



897 



No. 
Xlosselli, Gosimo . . . 364 Madonna and Child in Glory, 
Sacchi, P. F. / . .371 The Doctors of the Church, 
&arto, Andrea del (Yan- 

nncchi) 437 Charity, 

„ 438 Holy Family, 

„ 439 Holy Family, — Much restored. 

Sassoferrato .... 372 The Virgin and Child, 

„ .... 373 Asswnption of the Virgin, 

8olario, Andrea (under 
name of Andrea of 
Milan) , , . , , 36 The Crueifixion. 

„ 403 The Madonna an Coussin Vert, 

„ attributed to . 404 Portrait of Charles d*Amhoise. 
Spada, Lionello . . . 408 Martyrdom of St, Christopher, 
Spagna, Lo .... 214 bis. The Birth of Christ, 
Tiarini, Alessandro . .416 The Repentance of St Joseph, 
Tintoretto (Bobusti) . . 352 His ovm Portrait. 
Tiziano (Veoellio) . . 458 Virgin and Child with Sadnts, 

„ „ , , 459 Holy Family with St Catharine ^'a« 

Lapin** 
„ „ , . 460 Virgin, and Child with Saints, 

„ „ . . 462 The Pilgrims of Emmaus, 

„ „ , . 464 The Crovming with Thorns, 

J, „ . . 465 !Z%6 Entombm>erU, 

„ „ . . 4iQS Jupiter and Antiope, "Verms del Pardo,** 

„ „ . . 469 Portrait of Fran>cis I, 

„ „ . . 470 Portraits of Marquis del Vasto and his 

Mistress represented allegorically, 
„ „ . . 471 Portrait of a Woman at her Toilette, 

„ „ . . 472 Male Portrait 

„ „ . . 473 Portrait of a Young Man, 

„ „ . . 475 Portrait of the Commander of Malta, 

„ „ attri-'k 474 Portrait, — ^Undoubtedly a fine example 

buted to . • . j of G. A. Pordenone : G. and G. 

„ .... 461 Holy Family, 

Vanni, Francesco . . 434 The Martyrdom of St Irene. 
Vasari, Giorgio . . . 453 The AngeVs Salutation, 
Veronese (Galiari) . . 99 Esther before Ahamerus, 

„ „ . . 100 Virgin and Child with Saints, 



996 PAB18: THE LOVVRE. 



Yenmeae (CaliftH) 



Vinci, Ler/nardo da 



„ attributed to 



. 103 Tks Marriage at Cana, 
. 1(H T%« fea4f tn <&« H<m»e €f Simtm, 
. 105 C%rt«< (eartn^ (he Ooci.— SmalL 
. 107 Tft« POgrimM of Emmam*, 
. 107 bis. Jupiter destroying Criwte, 
. 108 FenuOe Porf ratt— And othem 
. 481 Virgin,Child,andSt,Anne,—JJi^xaAe^ 
. 483 FemoZtf Portrait, ^ La beOe Feranniert." 
. 484 Portrait of Mona lAsa {La Jooomde), 
. 480 SL John the BaptifL 
. 482 The Vierge aux Roekert, 
Yolterra, Daniele da . 347 David and Goliath, 

In the gallerj devoted to old Italian masters the following pictnreSj 
not jet catalogued (1877) and without numbers, should be noted : 

No. 
Gredi, Lorenzo di . . — A Noli me fon^ere.— Small* 
Fabriano, Gentile da . — Virgin a/nd Chdd, — Small. 

Florentine School, 15th 

century — Virgin enthroned with Saints, 

Oaddi, Agnolo . . . — Ari Annunciation, — SmalL 
Mainardi (School of 

Filippo Lippi) . . — Virgin, ChUdj and Saints, 

Montagna, Bartolommeo — Ecce Homo, 

Pinturiochio, B. . . . — Virgin and ChUd with Saints, 
Schools of Giotto and of 

Siena — Several small examples. 

Signorelli, Luca ... — Growp of life-size Figures, 

Tura, Oosimo .... — Single Figure of a Monk, 

Ucoello, P — Military Procession, 

In the Long Gallery are the following, also without numbers: 

No. 
Diirer, Albrecht ... — Man^s Head with Bed Ckip, — Signed 

1520. 

Goya, Fr — Portrait of a Man, — Full length. 

Hobbema, M. ... — Landscape, 



PARIS: THE LOUVRB, 



399 





No. 


^eer of Delft, Jan van dei 


• — A Woman malcing Lace. — His smallest 




work. 


?emzzi, Baldasarre . . 


— St. Catharine, — ^Life size. 


Potter, Paul . . . . 


— A Grey Horse. 


»» f> • • • • 


— Cattle under Trees. 


Rembrandt van Ryn 


— Sttidy in a SlaugJUer-house. 


libera, Jose . . 


. — A Pieta. — Life size. 


„ . . . . 


— A Saint at Prayer. 


Ryckaert, D. . . . 


. — A Painter's Studio. 


^lario, Andrea . . . 


— Man's Mead in a Vase. 


Fiepolo, J. B. . . . 


— A Last Supper. — Small. 


\yeyden, Rogier van der . 


— A Pieta, toith three Figures. 


Zurbaran, F 


— St Poionm.— Small 




Spanish School, 


Herrera, Francisco, el 




Viejo .... 


. 544 bis. St. Basil Teaching. 


Morales, Luis (El Divino 


) 545 Christ hearing the Cross. 


Murillo, Esteban 


. 546 A Concepcion. 


»» »» • 


. 546 bis. A Concepcion, 


i 


>» »» • 


. 546 ter. The Birth of the Virgin. 


) 


» »> • 


. 546 quater. Virgin in Ghry. 


3 


» »» • 


. 547 Virgin and Child. 


' 


>» >» • 


. 548 Holy Family, 




>» « 


, 550 bis. Miracle of San Diego. 


1 


n Yi • 


. 551 The Beggar-hoy. 


Ribera, Jos^ . . 


. 553 Adoration of the Shepherds. 


Velasquez, Diego 


, 555 Portrait of the Infanta Margarita Teresa 


»» »> 


. 555 bis. Portrait of Philip IV, of Spain. 


»» >» • 


. 556 A Portrait. 


f> »» 


. 557 Group of Portraits. — Small. 


Zurbaran, Francisco 


. 558 Legend of San Pedro Nolasco. 




" " 


, 569 The Funeral of a Bishop. 



) 



400 



PAMI8: THE LOWER 



THE LOUVBE AT PABIS. 
Gataloque of 1876. 
Second Part. — Qervnany Flemish, and Dutch Schools, 



Baokhnizen, Ludolf 



>» 



»» 



Bega, Cornelia 
Beham, Hans Sebald 
Berohem, Nicholas 



»» 



»» 



»» 



»» 



»» 



»» 



>» 



»» 



»» 



»» 



»> 



»> 



Bol, Ferd. 



»» 



»» 



Kb. 

5 7%e DuJe^ /S^gtioiZroii. 
7 Marine-piece. 

13 Jn^mor. 

14 The History of David. 

17 Fieto near -Nice. 

18 Landscape and Figures. 

19 Cmo« and Figures. — SmalL 
21 Landscape aud Figures. 

24 Cattle. 

25 Landscape. 
27 Landscape^ 
39 PhiZo8opJ^. 

41 Portrait of a Mathematician, 

42 -4 Portrait. — And others. 

43 Landscape, 

44 Landscape. 

67 Landscape. 

68 Landscape. 
47 Interior. 

Bmeghel, Jan (Velours). 58 Paradise. 

59 J(fy<&o2ogffeaZ Piece. 

60 Battle of Arhelles. — And others. 
Oiiampaigne, Philippe de 76 Christ in the House of Simon. 

79 Dead ChrisL 

83 Portraits of tufo Nfins. 

86 PoriraU of Louis XIIL 

87 Maie Portrait. 

88 Portrait of BdbeH Amaud d^AndtUy. 
91 Child^s PortraU. 

93 Female PoHrait. 

94 Portrait of Mansard and PerraulL 
99 Portrait of John of Saxony. 

100 Portrait 



>» 



Both, Jan and Andries 

Bril, Paul 

»> »» • 
Bronwer, Adrian 



»» 



>» 



»» 



»» 



»» 



»» 



»* 



<» 



»» 



»> 



rt 



n 



»» 



w 



»» 



>» 



Cranach, Lucas, elder 



99 



n 



»» 



PASIBi TBE LOUVSB. 



So. 










108 Equfitlrma Portrait. 


», A. 






IM Cow in a Landtcape. 


„ 








105 Starting for a Bide. 










106 Starting for a Bide. 










107 A Group of GkOdren. 










108 Male Portrait. 


ner, Baltb 


asa 






117 FmaU Portrait. 


.0- 








121 The Tint of the Dodor. 
128 The Village Grocer. 

124 The Trmnpeter. 

125 The Duldi Cook. 


„ 










: 








128 The DenUa. 

129 fl«.d.-nff Oe BibU. 

130 £» otni Portrait. 


q,j"i. 








IM Gmirrfro^m. 
135 TJi^ JlrU,and». 


k, Anton TOD 




186 FfrffiBflniCftiii. 


;; 




138 Bead Otriit^Small. 

139 a. &6«(ian. 


„ 




Ill Eeuaud and Armid. 


^ 




142 Porfroil of Charlet I. of Ertgland. 


" 




143 Portrait of the ChUdren of Charlei I. of 
England.— Small. 


•; 




144 3W PortraiU in one Frame. 

145 Lobelia of Spain. 

146 £^ue»Man Fortran. 

148 Portrait 0/ a Oentleman and Child. 

149 Pt^roa Of a Lady and Child. 


■ 




150 Portrait of Riehardat and hU Son. 

i52 Eis <!w,i Fortran. 

153 iSale ForlraU. 

I6i XahPortraU. 

106 Portrait.— A.DA otkeiB. 


iftimflrj AdfuU 




159 TAd Flight into Eqi^. 










2 D 



402 



PARIS: THE LOWBE, 



Eyok, Jan van 
Flinck, Gk>vert 



»> 



»» 



Fyt, Jan 



99 »» 



Gk>yen, Jan van 
Hals, Frans . 
Heem, Jan David de 



M 



Heist, Bart, van der 



»i 



>» 



»* 



>» 



»» 



» 



Heyden, Jan van der 



>» 



M 



»» 



99 



Hobbema, Meindert 



>» 




>» J 


>» >> 


»» 


»» »» 


>» 


>9 >> 


>» 5 


» ♦> 


»» 


» » 


»» 

attributec 


ito . . 


Honthorst, 


G. . . 


Hooghe, Pu 


• • 

3ter de . 


Huysum, Ji 


mTan . 


Jardin, Eai 


99 • 

'eldu 


>» 


i» 


»> 


n • 


>» 


» • 


»» 


»» • 


w 


If k 



No. 

162 The Virgin and Donator. 

171 The Angel and the Shepherds. 

172 Portrait of a LitOe Girl, 

177 GuTne and Fruit, 

178 Dead (?ame. 

181-184. Views in Holland, <fec. 
190 Portrait of Descartes, 

192 Fruits on a Table, 

193 Fruits on a Table. 

197 The Arquebusiers.—&tadj for the large 

picture at Amsterdam. 

198 Male PoHrait 

199 Female PoHrait. 

202 View in Amsterdam, 

203 Dtife^ Tovm, 

204 Du^ TWn. 

205 Landscape, 

206 PoHrait of Nicholas Kratzer. '^ 

207 PoHrait of WiUiam Warham, 

208 PoHrait of Erasmus. 

210 PoHrait of Sir Thomas More, 

211 Portrait of Anne of Cleves. 

212 Par<ra»<c/iStVJRio^r(2/8(w«^w?eK.— This 

is a replica of No. 765 in the Uffizi. 

213 PoHrait of a Man, 

209 A Head. 

215 Ptlate washing his Hands, 
219 PoHrait, 

223 Dutch Interior, 

224 Dufc^ Interior. 

238 Flowers and Fruit, 

239 Fflwe of J'ToMwr j. — ^And others. 
243 Italian Charlatans, 

245 Co^Ze. 

246 CatOe, 

247 XancKscope afu2 Jmtnab. 

249 The Ford, 

250 PoHrait — ^And others. 



PARIB: THE LOUVRE, 



403 



Tordaens, Jacob 



»» 



?» 



>» 



»» 



»> 



>» 



Kalf, WiUem 
Lingelbach, J. 



?» 



>» 



Maas, Nicholas 
Mabuse, Jan GoBsaert . 



»» 



» 



No. 

251 Ci^rii< driving out the Money-changers, 

254 Infancy of Jupiter, 

255 Feast of KingB. 

256 TA6 Cofioere a/ter e?^ Feos^, 
259 InterioT. 

270 JIfarA;e< ae Jt&me, 

271 ItoZian Port. 

273 Landacofpe and Ftguret. 

276 Soldiers Gaming. 

277 Portrait of Carondelet, 

278 Virgin and Child. 



Matsys, Quintin . 


. . . 279 Bar^eer and his Wife. 


ji » ' 


attri- 


buted to . . 


. . . 280 Descent from the Cross, 


Memling, Hans 


. . . 288 St, John the Baptist. 


» » 


. . 289 St. Mary Magdalen. 


Metsu, Gabriel . 


. . 292 The Market'plaoe at Amsterdam. 


»» » 


. . , 293 An Officer receiving a Lady. 


>» >» .' 


. , 294 The Music Lesson. 


?» >i 


. . . 295 Man at a Window. 


»» >» 


. . 296 Dutch Woman. 


)i >} 


. . . 297 A Cook. 


Meulen, Van der 


. . 301 Triumphal Entrance of Louis XTV. and 




his Que€n. 


>» >» 


. . 304 Court of Louds XIV. 


>» >» 


. . 308 Passage of ihe Rhine. 


>» »> 


. . 814 View of Fontainebleau. 


>» >» 


. . 317 BaUle. 


»» »> 


. . 318 Battle. 


Miens, Frans van 


, elder. 822 Portradi. 


„ Frans van 


. . 824 The Tea, 


„ Willem 


. . . 326 The Soap-hubbles. 


»» >» 


. . . S27 The Game Merchant. 


»» »» " 


. . . 328 The Shop. 


Mignon, A. . 


. . . 329 StiO-life. 


♦> 


. . 334 StiU'life. 


Moro, Antonio 


. , M2 Dwarf of Charles V. and Dog. 


Keefs, Pieter . 


. . . 347 Interior of a Cathedral. 


Neer, Artus van c 


ler . .354 Dutdh OumL 




2 D 2 



404 



PARIS: THE LOUVBE. 



Neer, Artns tmi der 
NetBcher, Ga^Mir 

Os, Jan Tan . . 
Ostade, Adrian van 



99 
>♦ 
>♦ 

W 

»» 

w 



>» 
» 



Isaac van 



» 



Ponrbofl, Frans, elder . 
Ponrbns, Frana, yonnger. 



» 
>» 



» » 

>» »> 



Potter, Pan! . . 

» » • • 
Bembrandt van Byn 



>» 
>» 
♦> 

>» 

» 



» 

>» 

» 
»» 
>» 



Bottenhammer 
Bubena, P. P. 



»> 
>» 



No. 

355 MoonUght/ 
358 I%6 Singing Lesson. 
859 T7i6 XeMon on t^ FioZ. 

368 Flowers and Fruit. 

369 Group of the Painter^s Family. 

370 The Schoolmaster. 

371 2%« Fish-market. 

372 Inferior o/ a Cottage. 

373 Man Reading. 

376 Arrival of Travellers at an Inn. 

377 TFaywdelnn. 

378 ii Frozen CanoZ in Holland. 

379 ii Frozen Canal in Holland, 

391 I%e .Besurrae/ion. 

392 The Last Svpper. 

394, 395. FuU-length Por^ratte.— Small. 

396 PoHraU of Marie de MidicU. 

397 Portrait. 

399 Animals in Landscape, 

400 !Z^ J7VeZ<2. 

404 T^ iin^eZ ^p^oeZ leaving Tobias. 

407 T^PtTgrrtfiwo/E'mniaus.— Small. 

408 A Philosopher in Meditation. — Small. 

409 A Philosopher in Meditation, — Small. 

410 An Interior. 

412 Portrait of Rembrandt, 

413 Portrait of Rembrandt, 

414 Portrait of Rembrandt, 

415 Portrait of Rembrandt when old. 

416 Male Portrait. 

417 Portrait of a Young Man. 

418 Male Portrait^Small. 

419 Female Portrait. 

424 Death of Adonis. 

425 The Flight of Lot. 

427 uiclorof ton o/ ^^ 3fa^». 

428 The Virgin " owaj on^e«." 

429 Virgin in a Garland of Flowers. 
432 Triumph of Religion. 



PABI8: THE LOUVBE. 



405 





No. 


^bens, P. P, . , 


. 433 TJuymyris causes the Head of Cyrus to he 




dipped in a Vase of Blood, 


» • 


. 434^54. Large Works relating to the History 




of Marie de Medicis, 


»» • • 


. 450 Elizabeth of France. 


»» • • 


. 455 Portrait of Frangois de M^dicis. 


» • • 


, 456 Portrait of Jeanne d*Autriche. 


j» • .• 


. 460 Portrait of Helena Fourment and two of 




his Children. 


»» • • 


. 461 Portrait of a Lady. 


»» • • 


. 462 ViUage Fete. 


»» • • 


. 465 Landscape. 


tnysdael, Jacob . . 


. 470 The Forest. 


»» »> • • 


. 471 Sea-piece. 


>» » • • 


. 472 Landscape, * The Thicket: 


»» « • • 


. 473 Landscape, * Bay of Sunlight.* 


chalken, Godfried . 


. 478 A Holy Family. 


»» »» 


. 480 A CandUlight Piece. 


iingeland, Pieter van 


. 486 A Dutch Family. 


»» » 


. 488 iSfoB-Zt/e.— Bmall. 


nyders, F. . . . 


. 489 Animals. 


»» ... 


. 490 Animals entering the Ark. 


„ ... 


. 492 Boar-hunt. 


prong, G. . . . 


. 498 Femde Portrait, 


teen, Jan 


. 500 A Flemish Feast. 


'eniers, David, younger. 512 The Prodigal Son. 


>» » »» 


. 513 The Works of Mercy. 


n »» »» 


. 514 The T&mptation of St. Anthony. 


»♦ »» » 


. 515 A Village Fair, 


11 11 1* 


. 516 Outside an Inn. — ^Large. 


11 11 >» 


, 518 Interior of an Inn. 


11 11 11 


. 520 The Heron-hunt. — And others. 


'erburg, G. . . , 


. 526 An Officer offering some Gold to a Young 




Woman. 


11 » • • 


. 527 The Music Lesson. 


11 »» • • 


. 528 The Concert. 


''een, Otho van . . 


. 535 Chroup of Himself and Family, 


'elde, Adrian van de 


. 536 TJie Beach at Scheveningen. 


»> w 


, 539 Landscape and Animals. 



406 



PARIS: THE LOUVRE. 





No. 


Yelde, Adrian van de 


. 540 Figures and Cows. 


„ Willem van de 


. 542 A MaHne Piece, 


Yenne, Adrian yan de 


. 545 Feast in Honour of the Armistice ^ 




dared between the Dutch and Albert- 




Austria, 


Verkolie, J. . . . 


. 547 Dutch Interior, 


Vols, Ary de . . . 


, 551 FttU'lengih Portrait.— Small. 


Weenix, Jan . . . 


. 554 Dead Hare. 


» » • • • 


. 555 Dead Hare and Peacock. 


Werflf, A. van der 


. 557-569. Various examples. 


Wouwerman, Philip 


, 505 The ^ Boeuf Gras.* 


>» >» 


. 567 Hunting-party. 


»> » 


, 570 The Riding-school^ \t\(\ cihers. 


Wynants, Jan . . 


. 579 Forest Scene. 


»> 5» • • 


, 580 Landscape, 


»» »> • • 


, 581 Landscape, 


Zorg 


, 421 Interior toith StiH-Ufe, 



Boucher, Frangois 



>> 



>» 



>» 






Boulogne, or Bool-' 

longne, Bon 
Bourdon, S^astien . 



THE LOUVBB AT PARIS. 
Catalogue of 1876. 

Thibd Pabt. — The French School, 

No. 
. 23 Renaud and Armid, 
. 24 Diana leaving the Balih, 
, 25 Venus applies to Vulcan for Arms. 
. 26, 27. Shepherdesses. 



» 



>» 



>» 



5» 



»> 



>» 



Bourguignon, Jacques 
Brnn, Charles le 



» 



» 



5» 



J> 



33 Hercules and the Centaurs, 
40 The Descent from the Cross, 
42 The Martyrdom of St Peter, 

47 Portrait of Ren4 Descartes, 

48 Portrait of the Painter. 

132 Cavalry Combat. — ^And several others. 

56 Infant Jesus Asleep. 

57 Holy Family^ the " Benedidte," 
58-61. Series from the Life of Christ, 



FABIS: THE LOUVBR 



407 



•^imii, Charles le 


No. 
, . 62 Chrut on the Cross and Angels, 


» »» 


. . 64 7%e Descent of the Holy Spirit. 


»> » 


, . 65 The Martyrdom of Stephen. 


n »» 


, . 66 A Bepentant Mdgdalen. 


»» >? 


, . 70-74. Scenes from the History of Alexander, 


» " 


. 75 Meleager and Atalanta, 


^-^asanoYa, Fraii9oi8 . 


. . 91 4 Batile-piece. 


j> n 


. 92 A BoMe-piem, 


Ohardin, J. B. . . 


. 96 Kitch&n Utensils. 


w • ' 


. 97 Fruits, Animals, &c. 


» • ' 


, . 99 The Blessing. 


>» • 


. . 100 Dead Babbit and Hunting-gear. 


w • " 


, . 101 Kitchen Utensils. 


>» • " 


. . 102 Kitchen Utensils. — And others, numbered 




and unnumbered. 


Cloliet, Fian^ois . . 


. 107 Portrait of Charles IX. of France. 


»» » • • 


. 108 Portrait of EUzabeth of Austria, Wife of 




Charles IX. of France. 


» »i at< 


iri- 


buted to . . . 


. 115 Male PortraU. 


>» . . . 


. 116 Male Portrait. 


Glouet, Francois, Soh 


ool 


of 


— Several good examples. 


Gochereau . . . 


. 127 Students painting from the Living 




Modd. 


Conflin, Jean . . . 


. 137 The Last Judgment. 


Coypel, Noel . . . 


. 142 Cain the Murderer. 


„ Antoine . . 


. 143 Aihaliah turned out of the Temple. 


David, Jacques Louis 


. 148 Leonidas at ThermopyUe, 


» » 


. 149 The Sabine Women. 


» »> 


. 150 The Oath of the Horatii. 


n >» 


. 151 Odie Victors bnng to Brutus the Bodies 




of his tvH) Sons. 


w w 


. 159 Portrait of Pius VII. 


» » 


. 160 Portrait of Madame BScamier, 


Desportes, Francois . 


. 162 His own Portrait. 


>» »> 


. 164 Wolf-hunt. 


» » • 


. 165 A Boar-hunt. 


» » • 


. 166 The Stag-hunt, 



408 



PABIS: THE LOUVBE. 



Desportes, Francois . 
Febvre, Claude de . 
Fouquet, Jean, attri- 



No. 

180, 181. Game and Dogs, — ^And oth 

195 Two PoHraits, 



buted to 


. . 652,653. PoHraiU. 


Fragonard . . 


. . 208 A ClaasicaZ Design f(yr Tapestry. 


Fr^^minet, Martin 


. . 211 Apneas abandons Dido. 


French School, Early . 650, 651, 654. Portraits. 


Gelee, Claude (Lorraine) 219 8ea-port 


V >> 


„ 220 View of the Campo Vaccino, B<ynn 


>» »» ! 


221 Village Fair. 


>» » 


„ 223 The Tjonding of Cleopatra at Tar 


>» »» 


„ 224 David anoirUed King hy Samuel. 


»» » ' 


„ 225 Ulysses restoring Chryseis toher 1 


>» »» 1 


„ 226 8ea-poH. 


» »> i 


231 The Ford. 


Greuze, J. B. 


. . 260 The Village Bride. 


>» 


. . 261 !Z^ Paternal Curse. 


»> 


. . 262 The Punished Sm. 


» • 


. . 26S The Broken Pitcher. 


f» • 


. . 264 His own PoHraiL 


It • 


. . 265 PoHrait, 


Hire, Laurent de la 


. . .286 Madonna and Child. 


11 >» 


. . 290 Pope Nicholas and the Body 




Francis. 


Jouvenet, Jean . 


. . 297 The Draught of Fishes. 


»» » 


. . 298 The Baising of Lazarus. 


»♦ » • 


. . ZQl The Descent from the Cross. 


V »> 


. . 802 The Ascension. 


»» » • 


. . 306 Portrait. 


Lancret, Nicolas . 


. . 310-313. The Four Seasons. 


Largilli^, Nicolas 


. . 320 PoHrait of Charles le Brun. 


Loo, Carle van 


. . 326 Marria>ge of Joseph and the Virgi 


»> V 


. . 329 Best from Hunting. 


»» 11 • 


. . 330 Portrait of Marie Leczinska, Qt 




France. 


„ Jean Baptiste 


van . 324 Institution of the Order of th 




Ghost. 


Mignard, Pierre . 


. . 349 The Madonna with the Grapes. 


" w • 


. . 358 Group of Louis the Dauphin arid J 



PABI8: THE LOUVRE, 



409 





No. 


Mignard, Pierre . 


. . 360 HU own Portrait 


Kain, Le . . . . 


. 875 Blacksmith at his Forge. 


,, ... 


. .377-4 Village Scene. 


f» . . » . 


. 378 Procession of Priests, 


Oudry, J. B. . 


. 386 Pointer. 


„ . . . 


. 387 2%6 Wolf-hunt. 


„ . . . 


. 388 Dog guarding Game. 


Patel, Pierre . . 


. 395 JDand^cope. 


n »» • • ' 


. . 396 Landscape. 


Pater, J. B. . . , 


, . 403 ii Rustic Feasf. 


Porte, Roland de la . 


. 413 StiU-life. 


Poussin, Nicolas . , 


, . 415 Eliezer and Rebehah. 


»» »» • 


. . 416, 417. . 2%6 Finding of Moses. 


»> »» 


. 421 Philistines stricken with the Plague, 


•»» »» • • 


. 426 Healing the Blind. 


» >» • 


. . 433 !Z%e JEfc8<a«y o/ 8t Paul 


>» »> 


. . 434 Miracle of St. Frangois Xavier. 


»» ♦» • • 


. 436 Roman Subject. 


>» »> • 


. . 437 Pyrrhus Saved. 


» » 


. 440 Ba>cchanalia. 


»» » • ' 


. 443 Triumph of Flora. 


» »» • 


. . 445 The Shepherds of Arcadia. 


»> „ . . 


, . 446 Triumph of Truth. 


» » 


. . 447 fli*8 OMW Portrait 


» » 


. . 448-451. The Fowr Seasons. 


>» »» 


. 453 Diogenes. . 


Bigaud, Hyacinthe . 


, . 475 Portrait of Louis XIV. 


V »» 


. 476 Portrait of Philip V. of Spain. 


»j » 


. . 477 Portrait of Bossuet. 


»> » 


. 479 Portrait of Desjardins, 


»r n 


. 480 Portraits of Le Brun and Mignard. 


Santerre, J. B. . 


. 496 Susannah at the Bath. 


Subleyras, P. . . 


. 504 Christ at the House of Simon. — And 




others. 


Sueur, Eustache le . 


. 517 Christ hearing the Cross. 


>» >» 


. 518 Descent from the Cross. 


5» M 


. 519 Christ and Mary Magdalen, 


1> >» 


. 520 Saints refusing to sa/srifice to Jupiter. 


>» >» < 


. . 521 The Preaching of St Paid. 



410 



TARIS: THE LOUVRE. 



Sueur, Enstache le . 



rt 



rt 



Tocqn^ Loiub 
Tioy, J. F. de . . 
Yalentiii, Moise . . 



n 



vt 



»♦ 



Yemet, Jos^h 



Yien, Joseph Marie 



»» 



>» 



Youet, Simon 



M 



»» 



W 



»♦ 



n 



Wattean, Antoine 



No. 
. 525-547. TkeHigioryof8t,Br%mo.—l 

theee Kos. 525 and 527 are the 
. 551-556. The HiiUfry of Love. 
. 558-562. BepresentationBo/tkeNine 
. 577 PortraU of Marie LeeHfuka, Qu 

France, 
. 581 Henry TV. and Courtiert.—An 

without nnmbers. 
. 583 Innoeenee of Susannah, 
. 584 Judgment of Solomon, 
. 586 AConeert 
. 587 Group of Muneians, 
. 588 The Fortune-teller. 
. 592-632. Views of French Marine Pai 

Marine Piecesy of which Noc 

615, 617, 623 are the best 
. 634 SL Germain and SL Vincent. 
. 636 The Sleeping Hermit. 
. 637 Cupids and FUnoers. 
. 641 The Presentation of Jesus in the 2 
. 642 Holy Family. 
. 645 B<man Charity. 
. 647 AUegory of Biehes, 
. 649 Embarkation f<yr the Island of Cyi 



One of the lofty halls contains several deooratiye works, chi( 
Boucher, Natoire, Yerdier, and others. Ahove these hang four 
works by C. le Brun. 



THE LOUYBB AT PABIS. 

Gatalooub or 1876. 

The GoLLEonoN or M. Louis La Gaze. 

Itaiian School. 



No. 



Guardi, Francesco , 
Tintoreito (Bobusti) 



11 View of the Salute, Venice. 
19 Portrait of a Venetian Senator, 



PABI8: THE LOUVBE, 



411 



a, Jo8^ . . . . 
quez, Diego, attri- 
ed to . . . . 
quez, Diego 



Spanish School, 
No. 
32 Tlie Beggar. 

37 Portrait of the Infanta Maria Teresa. 
39 Portrait of a Young Woman, 



JFlemish, Dutch, and German Schools, 



ilenkamp 
wer, Adrian . 
ipaigne, Philippe de 
er, Balthasar . . 
T. . . 



Frans . 



>» 



• • 



Willem . 
, Nicholas 
P. van 
le, Adrian yan . 

»» • ♦ 

Isaak van 

cker, A. ... 

itejn, Jan van . 

)randt van Byn 

j> »> 

ns,P.P. . . . 

an, Frans . . . 
I » . . . 

J Jan • • « . 
rs, David, younger. 



5> 



>» 



>» 



» 



irg, Gerard . . . 
T^erman, P. . . . 



46 The Doctor's Visit, 

44 The Operation, 

51 Portrait of Jean Antoine de Mesme. 

53 Portrait of an Old Woman, 

61 Dead Game, 

65 The Gipsy. 

66 Portrait of a Woman. 
76 StilUife, 

78 The Blessing. 

80 Head of a Young Man. 

82 The Drinker. 

87 The Schoolroom. 

91 Landscape in Winter. 

93 Landscape. 

94 Female Portrait. 

96 A Woman at the Bath. 

98 Male Portrait 
100 Portrait of Marie de Medicis, 
116 A Fish Merchant. 
120 Fruits, 
122 The Family Meal, 
124 ^ Kermess, 
128 A Village Fair. 
133 The Collector of Alms. 
145 The Beading Lesson. 
152 The Pilgrims, 



her, Francois 



9> 



French School, 

161 Vulcan and Venus. 

162 The Three Graces. 



412 



FARI8: THE LOUVBE. 





No. 


Boucher, Francois 


. . IQi The Forge of Vulcan, 


Bourdon, S. . . 


. 166 An Interior. 


Chardin, J. B. . . 


, . 170 The BUssing, 


»> 


, , 171 Boy with Cards.— Ure size. 


>» 


. . 172 Monkey Painting. 


>» • 


. . 173 StiUAife, 


>» 


. . 174 StiXUife. 


»» 


. . 175 StiOrlife, 


it 


. . ne The Brass Fountain. 


»» 


. . 177 StUUife. 


»> • 


, . 178 StUUife. 


>» 


. 179 Different Utensils. 


»» • • 


. 180 Fruit and Glass. 


»» • • 


. 181 The Silver GohUt. 


» • • 


. 183 The Basket of Grapes, 


»> • • 


. 184 Kitchen UtensiU. 


Fragonard . . . 


. . 194 Bathers. 


»» . . . 


. 196 Venus. 


» 


. . 198 ii Study. 


»» . . . 


. . 199 ii Stud,y. 


Oren7.e, J. B. . . . 


, . 201 His own Portrait. — And others. 


» 


. . 20Q Head of a Young Girl. 


Lancret . 


. 213 Dramatic Scene. 


Largilli^re . . . 


, . 216 SmaU Study for the 'Conference* in 




Hermitage, St. Petersburg. 


>» . . . 


. 221 PortraU. 


>» . . . 


. 224 PoHrait Group. 


Le Nain . . . . 


. . 227 Peasants' Repast. 


Pater, J. B. . , 


. . 234 A Bunion of Comedians. 


,< . . 1 


. 235 The Toilette. 


„ . . . 


. 236 Garden Party. 


Porte, Roland de la . 


. 238 Nature Morte. 


Bigaud, H. . . . 


. 241 Portrait of an Ecclesiastic. 


„ , . . 


. 242 Portrait of a Youth. 


Watteau, Ant. . . 


. 260 Portrait of Gilles. 


»» »i • 


. . 261 L'Indifferent. 


>» »» • • 


, . 263 An Assembly in the Park. 


» » • 


. . 2G4t The Conjurer. 



DULWJCH: THE OALLEBT, 



413 



'^BE PICTUEE GALLEKIES of ENGLAND. 



THE DULWICH GALLERY AT DULWICH. 
Catalogue of 1876. 



^rohem, N. 



»> 



»> 



j> 



Both, J. and A. 



»» 



» 



» 



>» 



>» 



»» 



»» 



>» 



Biouwer, A. 
Ohardin, S. 



» 



Claude Gel^ (Lorraine) 



» 



>» 



» 



>» 



w 



Cuyp, A. 



»» 



>» 



» 



>» 



»» 



»» 



»> 



Doloi, Carlo 
Domeniohino 
Dow, G. . 



No. 

17 Landscape with Figures. 
160 Food /Soen6. 
200 Landscape toith Figures and CaJtUe. — 

Called Le Soir. 
209 Landscape toith Figures and Cattle. — 
CaUed Le Midi, 

30 Landscape with Figures, 

36 Landscape toith Figures a/nd Cattte. 

41 Landscape with Figures and Cattle, 
199 Landscape and Figures, 
205 Landscape, 

54 Interior of an Jlehouse, 

27 Girls at Work, 
308 Woman with a Hurdy-gurdy, 
244 Landscape — Jacob and Lahan. 
270 Embarkation of St, Paula, 
275 Seorport, 
9 Landscape ujith Figures and Cattte. 

83 Landscape toith Cattle and Figures. 
141 Landscape mth Figures, 
145 Winter Scene, 

163 Landscape with Cattle and Figures. 
169 Landscape with Cattle and Figures. 
239 Landscape toith Cattte, 
241 View of DoH, 
337 Maier Dolorosa, 
226 Venus gathering Apples, 

85 il» Old Woman eating Porridge. 



414 



DULWICE: THE OALLEBY. 



Dow, G 

Doghet, Gaspar (Poussin) 

Doaart 

Dyck, A. Tan 



»» 



>» 



Gainsborough 



»» 
>» 

» 



Gueroino . 
GuidoBeni 



>j 



>» 



Hobbema, M. . 
Holbein, attributed to . 



Huysum, J. van . 
Jardin, Karel du 



>» 



» 



Le Brun, C. 



»» 



Murillo 



>» 



>» 



» 



Neefs, P., elder 
Neer, Artus van 
Opie, J. . 
Ostade, A. yan 



der 



» 



>» 



» 



» 



Poelenburg . 
Poussin, Nicolas 



» 

99 



» 
»» 
» 



No. 

106 A Lady playing on a Spinet. 

269 Destruction of Niche and Tier Childr 
104 An Old Building with Figures, 
135 Virgin and ChUd. 
214 Portrait of the Earl of Pembroke. 
1 Portraits of Mrs. Sheridan and 
Sister. 
358 Portrait of Thomas Linley, 

361 Portrait of Samud LirUey. 

362 Portrait of Thomas Linley. 

366 Portraits of Mrs. Moodey and her ( 

dren. 
324 St CeciUa. 

331 SL John in the Wilderness. 
339 St. Sebastian. 
131 Landscape toiGh a Water-mill. 
353 Portrait of an Old Man. — Ascribe 

Amberger by Mr. Womum. 
140 Flowers. 

62 Landscape with Cattle and Figures 
229 Smith shoeing an Ox. 
252 Hie Massacre of the Innocents. 
319 Roratius Codes defending the Brid 
248 The Spanish Flower-girl, 
283 Three Spanish Boys. 
286 Two Spanish Boys. 
347 The Madonna ''del Bosario.'' 
79 Interior of a Cathedral. 
112 Moonlight Scene. 
3 His own Portrait, 

107 An Interior, 
152 A Man Smoking. 
190 Boors making Merry. 

14 Landscape with Figures. 
279 Landscape. 

291 The Adoration of Vie Magi, 
295 The Inspiration of a Poet, 
300 Education of Jupiter, 
806 Triumph of David. _ , 



DULWICM: THE GALLEBT. 



415 





No. 


onsain, Nicolas . . 


. 310 The Flight into Egypt 


j» *» • • 


. 315 Bindldo and Armida. 


» »> • • 


. 336 Assumption of the Virgin. 


'jmacker . . . . 


. 130 Landscape with Sportsmen. 


»» . . . . 


. 150 Landscape and Figures. 


lembrandt . . 


. . 179 Jacob's Dream. 


>» • • 


, . 189 A Porfra«.— Small. 


,, . . • 


. 206 Portrait of his Serving^maid. 


91 . . . 


. 282 A Por^raaf.— Said to be that of Wou- 




wermaD. 


teynolds, J. . . . 


. 143 Mother and her Sick Child. 


»* . . . 


. 146 His own Portrait. 


»» * • 


. . 254 Sketch for the Death of Cardinal 




Beaufort, 


yi • • • 


. . 285 Samuel. 


>» 


. . 340 Mrs. Siddons as the Tragic Muse. 


tigaud, H. . . 


. . 2 Portrait of Louis XTV. 


>» 


98 Portrait of Boileau. 


» 


. . 118 Male PoHraU. 


tosa, Salyator . . 


. 159 Landscape, 


»» >» 


. . 271 Soldiers Guming, 


lubens . . . 


. . 351 Venust Mars, and Cupid, 


»» ... 


. . 855 Portrait of his Mother. 


Inyadael . . . 


. . 154 ^ Waterfcdl 


^arto, A . del, attribnt 


edto 827 Holy Family.— Bu:ppo8ed to be a fine 




copy of the Bame subject at the Pitti, 




Florence. 


Uingeland . . 


. . 151 Boy with Bird^s Nest 


reniers, David, eldei 


' , 18 Winter, 


„ D., younger 


60 A Sow and Pigs. 


» » 


, 116 A Winter Scene. 


>» >» 


. 119 Landscape with Figures. 


»* » 


, 139 Landscape with Figures. 


>j i> 


. 185 The Chaff-cutter.—And others. 


riepolo . . . 


. . 99 Joseph and Pharaoh. 


„ ... 


. . 233 Sketch for a Ceiling. 


„ ... 


, . 236 Sketch for a CeUing, 


Velde, A. van de 


, . 72 Landscape unth Cattle. 


,, W.yande 


. . 113 A Calm. 



416 



HAMPTON COVET: TEE OALLEBY. 





No. 


Velde, W. van de 


. . 166 u4 Bruk GaU, 


n » 


. . 186 ul Calm, 


Yelasqnez, Diego 


, attri- 


bated to 


194 Prince BaUasar Carlos. 


» 


. . . 309 Portrait of PhUip IV, of Spain, 


Vemet, C. J. . 


. . . 202 View near Borne, 


Watteau, A. . 


. . . 197 Fete Champetre, 


n 


. . . 210 FSte Champetre. 


Werff, Vander . 


, . 191 Judgment of Paris, 


Wilson, R. . 


. . . 215 View of Tivoli. 


Wouwerman, P. 


. 137 The Farrier and the Convent, 


» 


. , 173 Landscape with Figures, 


»> 


, . , 228 Landscape with Figures, 


Wynants, Jan 


. . . 11 Landscape, 


w » 


, . . 12 Landscape, 


>» »> < 


, . . 278 Landscape. — Figures by A. van de 




Velde. 


Zuccarelli . . . 


, . . 231 Landscape and Figures. 



THE COLLECTION IN HAMPTON COURT PALACE. 

Catalogue of 1876. 

A few pictures are referred to here as interesting on account of 
their relation to English history rather than as specimens of art work. 
In this gallery the names of the great masters are attached without 
warrant to numerous pictures. 

No. 

Bassano, Jacopo ... 78 Portrait of a Oentleman. 

Beechey, Sir William . 354 George IIL reviewing Cavalry. 

Bookman 5 Portrait of Lord Anson, . 

Bordone, P., attributed 

to 182 Portrait, 

Bray, De 66 Portrait of Himself and Family, 

Brueghel, Pieter, elder . 748 The Massacre of the Innocents, 

Campidoglio .... 539 Fruit, 

„ .... 544 Grapes. 

Canaletto 9 The Colosseum at Borne, 



MAMPTON COVET: TEE QALLEET, 



41t 



Clouet, FraiK^is (cata- 
logued as Janet) . 



»» 



» 



Glouet, School of. 
Gomelis . . . . . 

Dance, Wm 

Deaner 

Dobson, Wm. . . . 
Doiai, Doaao, attiibated 

to 

Dyok, Anton van . . 



»» 



M 



W 



Eyck, Jan van, School of 
Francia, Francesco . . 

Gauudbotough . . . 

n ... 

Geiard, Marc 
Giorgione, attributed to . 



»» 



)} 



Grease .... 
Guide, attributed to . 
Hals, Frans . . . 



»> 



»> 



Ueem, Jan David de 



n 



n 



Heemskerk, M. 
Heere, L. da . 
Heist, Van der 
Holbein, Hans 

> M 

» »» 

^» 
^» 

buted to 



No. 

561 The Queen of Francis I, 

631 Mary Queen of Scots. 

632 Francis 11. of France. 
566 Franeis I. and Lady. 
564, 665, 567. PortraiU. 

374 PortraU of Bishop of Winchester. 
85, 36. Two Heads. 
376 Portrait of Himself and Wife. 

80 Male PoHrait 

47 Portrait of Mrs. Lemon. 

85 Equestrian Portrait of Charles L 
387 Samson and Delilah. 
590 Head of a Young Man. 
307 The Baptism in Jordan. — ^Replica of 
No. 437 at Dresden. 

352 Portrait of Fischer the musician. 

353 Portrait of Colonel St. Leger. 
619 Portrait of Queen Elizabeth. 

79 Holy Family. — An inferior copy. 
158 Portrait. — ^And others not by the 

master. 
413 Louis XVL of France. 
301 Judith and Hohfemest 
676 Sketch of a Man. 
682 A Laughing Boy. 
467 StiUrlife. 
469 StiU-life. 

587 Dea^ and Last Judgment. 
349 Queen ElizaheUi in a Fancy Dress. 
770 Portrait of a Dutch Gentleman, 
594 Erasmus Writing. 
597 Erasmus. 
608 Frobenius the Printer. 
608 Portraits of his Father and Mother. 
610 Beskemeer or BesMmer. 



attri- 



559 Countess of Lennox. 



2 E. 



418 



HAMPTON COURT: THE QALLEBT. 



Holbein, Hans, attri- 
buted to 



99 



Hondeooeter . . . 
Honthorst . . . 



99 



• • • 



Hoppner 



»» 



James 



Kanfinann, Angelica. 



Knapton 



Kneller, Sir Godfrey 



99 
»» 
>f 
»9 

»9 



99 
99 
99 
99 

99 



Lely, Sir Peter . . 



No. 



563 Henry VIII, when yonng, 

592 A French Nobleman, 

593 His own Portrait 
598 Francis I, of France. 

606 Henry VIII, — Numerous others are 
ascribed to Holbein here which have 
no claim whatever to be regarded as 
his work. Some large compositions 
also in the Queen's audience chamber 
bearing his name are interesting con- 
temporary productions, as containing 
cofitumes and illustrating events of 
the time : vide Kos. 337, 339, 340, and 
842. 
463 Poultry, 

58 Duke of Buckingham and Family, 
330 Portrait of Christian^ Duke of Bruns- 
wick, 
355 Francis^ Duke of Bedford, 
358 The Earl of Moira, 
883, 884, 885, 914, 919, 921, 923, 925. Views 

in and about Old London, 
502 Portrait of the Duchess of BrunS' 

wick, 
361 Family of Frederick, Prince of 
Wales, 
29 King WiUiam landing at Tofhay, 
40 Miss Pitt, 
46 Duchess of Grafton, 
50 Countess of Dorset. 
57 Portrait of Peter (he Great, when 
yohng. 

— Several Portraits of Court Beauties, 

— Several Portraits of the Beauties of 

King Charles II,* s Court are found 
between Kos. 190 and 207; this last, 
the Countess of Chrammont, is a par- 
ticularly good example. 



HAMPTON COURT: THE GALLEBT. 



419 



Iiely, Sir Peter, attributed 
to 

Longhi, Pietro . . 



»» 



w 



Liotto, Liorenzo 

„ „ attri- 

buted to ... . 

Kabnse, Jan, attributed'^ 
to / 

Monnoy er (Baptiste) . . 

Moro, Antonio, attri- 
buted to ... . 

Mytens 

Padovanino .... 

Palamedes .... 
Palma Vecchio . . . 



tributed to . 



attri- 



• • 



Pordenone 

„ attributed to . 



Poussin, Nicolas . . . 
Bembrandt, attributed to 



»» 



Kicci, S. 



» 



Riley, John .... 
Sebastiano del Piombo, 

attributed to 
Somer, Paul van . . 



No. 

'185 Portrait of Lady Byron or of Lady 
Bellasys. — This fine portrait is more 
probably by Jacob Huysman of 
Antwerp. 

549 BUnd Man's Bufi, 

551 Attending the Sick. 

148 Portrait of a Sculptor. 

144 il Concert. 

385 Adam and Eve. — Suggestive rather of 

the work of the Cranachs. 
457, 459, 530, 534, 547. Flower-pieces. 

640, 644. Portraits.— And others. 
44 Portrait of the first Marquis of Hamilton. 

164 A copy of the Venus of Titian at 
Darmstadt. 

334 Coa^t at Scheveningen, 

115 Small Holy Family. — ^Perhaps by the 
master. No other work assigned to 
him in the gallery can possibly be 
considered as genuine. 
79 This is not by Palma ; it is a second-rate 
copy of the Holy Family by Titian, 
No. 236 at Madrid. 
92 Male Portrait 

104 Portraits of Himself and Family. — This 
is a replica by the brother Bernar- 
dino Licinio of the original in the 
Borghese Gallery at Bome. 

380 Mythological Painting, 

381 Male Portrait. 

382 Female Portrait. 
121 Healing the Sick, 

131 Woman taken in Adultery. 
372 PoHrait of Mrs, Elliott. 

70 An Italian Lady, 

98 Christian, King of Denmark. 



426 



HAMFTON COURT: THE OALLERT. 



Stone, Henry, called 
"Old Stone" . . . 
Thornhill, Sir James 
Titian 






Raphael, attribated to . 



Roestraten .... 
Velasquez, attributed to . 



n 



Velde, W. van de, attri- 
buted to 
Verdussen 
Walker, Robert 
Wright . . 
Zucchero,.F. . 



} 



Ka 



444 A copy of the Cbmafv Family by Titian. 

— The Ceiling of the Queen* 9 Bedroom, 
116 Titian's Unde. 

122 Marquis del VaMo and Page, 

149 PoHrait of Aleesandro di Medici,— 

Many osiers are attributed to Titian, 

but none can be admitted as genuine ; 

and the foregoing are greatly ii^ured 

by retouching. 
710 A Head.—yeTf finely painted, but is by 

no means necessarily by an Italian 

master. 
744 BtiO-Ufe. 
82 PoHrait of Philip IV, 
90 Queen of PMip IV, 

— Numerous large naval battle-pieces in 

the Qtieen't) Presence Chamber. 
657 View of Windsor Castle. 
865 His own Portrait. 
369 John Lacy, Comedian. 
20 Queen Eii^abeOCs Porter, 



THE NATIONAL GALLERY AT LONDON. 

Oatalogije op 1877. 

Foreign Schools. 
Ko. • 



AUori, Cristofano, at- 
tributed to ... . 
Aluono, Niccolb . 
Angelico, Fra Giovanni. 

Antonello da Messina . 

Backhuizen, L. . . . 

„ ... 



21 Portrait of a La^, 
247 Ecee Homo. 
663 Chrt'st in Glory with Angels and aU the 

Blessed. 
673 The Saviour. 
204 Dutch Shipping, 
818 CoaU Scene. 



LONDON: THE NATIONAL GALLERY, 



421 



Baroooi, F. . 
Basaiti, Karoo 



rt 



Bassano, Jaoopo 



99 



99 



99 



Bellini, Giovanni 



>» 

^» 

99 



» 
»» 



Bellini, Giovanni, attri- 
buted to ... . 

Bellini, Giovanni, School 
of 

Beltraffio 

Berohem, N 

Biflsolo, Francesco . . 

Boccaccino, B. . . . 

Bol,Ferd 

Bono Ferrarese . 

Bonsignori, Francesco . 

Bordone, Paris 



« 



99 



Borgognone, Ambrogio . 



w 



» 






Both, Jan 



»» M 



Botticelli, Sandro . , 
„ attri- 



No. 

29 Holy Family « del GaUo.** 
281 8t. Jerome, 
599 Virgin and Child. 
228 Christ driving out the Money-changerf. 
277 The Ooed Samaritan. 
173 MaHe Portrait. 
189 Portrait of the Doge Loredano. 
280 Madonna and Child. 
726 The Agony in the Garden. — Early. 
808 St. Peter Martyr as a Dominiean. 
812 Martyrdom of St. Pef-er — Landscape. 

694 8t. Jerome in his Study.* 

284 Warrior adoring the InfarU Christ.* 
728 Madonna and Child. 
240 Orossing the Ford. 
631 Portrait of a Lady. 
806 Procession to Calvary. 
679 Portrait of an Astronomer. 
771 St. Jerome in the Desert.- 
736 Portrait. 
637 Daphnis and Chloe. 
674 Portrait of a Genoese Lady. 
298 TJie Marriage of St. CaXharine. 
779, 78a FamUy PoHraits. 
— Fragments of a SUk Standard. 
209 Large Landscape. — ^Figores by Poelen- 

burg. 
959 8maU Landscape. 
21a Virgin and Child, St. John, and Angel. 



bxited to 



>» • 



Bourdon, Sebastien . 
Bouts, Dieriek 
BnuBuitino . . . 



915 Mars and Venus. 
. 916 Venus reclining with Cupids. 

64 Return of the Ark from Captivity. 
. 783 ExhumaHon of St. Hubert. 

729 Adoration of the Kings. — Given 
Foppa by C. and C. 

• Boih ibete an given to Gsteiuk bj C. and C. 



to 



422 



LONDON: THE NATIONAL GALLERY. 



Bronzino, Angelo . . 



>» 



»» 



Ganale, Antonio 



w 
>» 
J» 
>» 



9» 

»> 



Oapelle, Van de 



n 



9* 



Garacoi» Annibale 









»» 



Lodovico 
Gaiavaggio, 1£ da . . 
Oasentino, Jacopo di. . 
Champaigne, Philippe de 
Cima da Conegliano . . 



»> 



Cimabue 



»> 



>» 



No. 
651* Venus, Cupid, Folly, and Time. 

670 A Knight of St. Stephen. 

127 View in Venice. 

163 View on the Grand Canal. 

937 The Scuola di San Bocco. 

940 Ducal Paktce. 

942 View of KUm College. 

964 Biver Scene. 

965 Biver Scene. 

9 St. Peter meeting Christ. 
25 St. John in the Wilderness. 
56 Landscape with Figures.- 
88 Erminia and the Shepherds. 
28 Susannah and the Elders. 
172 Christ at Emmaus. 
580 St, John lifted up into Heaven^ 
798 Three Portraits in one Frame. 
300 Madonna and Child. 
634 Virgin and Child. 
816 The In&redulity of St. Thmnas. 
565 Madonna and Child enthroned % 
Angels. 
2 Pastoral Landscape with Figure$* 
5 A Sea-port at Sunset. 
.6 Landscape, — Called Chigi Claude. 
12 Landscape — Marria^^e of Isaac 
Bebekah. 

14 Embarkation of the Queen of Shebt 

Called Bouillon Claude. 
30 Embarkation of St. Ursula. 
660 Male PortraU. 
821 Family Portraits. 
10 Mercury instructing Cupid in 
Presence of Venus. 

15 Ecce Homo. 

23 Holy Family " au panier.'* 

76 The Agony in the Chxrden. — Bepetit 

of the original in possesaion of 

Duke of Wellington. 



»» 



»r 



Claude Gel^ (Lorraine) . 






» 






Clouet, Francois . 
Coques, Gonzales 
Correggio . , . 



LONDON: THE NATIONAL GALLERY. 



428 



No. 
Ooeta, Lorenzo ... 629 Madowna and Child Enthroned, 
Oranaoh, Luoas . . . 291 SvnaU Female Portrait. 
Oiedi, Lcnenzo di . . 593 Virgin and Child, 
ft M ... 648 Virgin and Child. 

Criyelli, Carlo . . . 724: Madonna and Child Enthroned^** deUa 

BondineJ* 
„ w ... 602 J Pietd. 

„ f, ... 739 The Annunciation. 

„ „ . . . 668 2%e Beato Ferretti adoring the Virgin 

and Child. 
ft n • . • 788 Virgin and Child enthroned vtiih 

Saints. 

Gnyp, A 53 Evening. — Landscape with figures. 

„ 823 Water and Cattle. 

M 960 Landscape with Wind-mills. 

Deelen, Dirk ysn . . 1010 Architectural Subject. 

Dietrich 205 Itinerant Musicians. 

Domenichino .... 48 Tobias and the Angel. 

„ » ... S5 St. Jerome and the Angel, 

Dow, Gtorard .... 192 His own Portrait. 
ft ft .... 825 2%6 Poulterer's Shop. 

„ „ .... 968 jHm Wife's Portrait. 

Dughet, CJaspar (called 
Poosdn) .... 31 Landscape — Abraham and Isaae. 
„ .... 95 IHdo and JBneas in the Storm. 

„ .... 161 Italian Landscape. 

Dnrer, A. 245 Portrait of a Senator. 

Dyck, Van .... 680 Miraculous Draught of Fishes.— Biodj. 

„ „ .... 877 His ovon Portrait. 
Ekheimer, Adam . . \(i\^ Martyrdom of St Lawrence. 
Engelbert8Z,attiibat6dto 7 H Madonna and Child. 
Eyck, Jan van . . . 186 Portraits of Amoljini and his Wife, 
^ „ ... 222 Portrait of a Man in a Oreen Hood, 

„ M ... 290 Portrait of a Man in a Red Head' 

dress. 
Franoia, Francesco . .179 Virgin and Child and St, Anne en* 

throned with Saints. 
. . 180 A Pieta.^A lunette. 
. . 638 Virgin and Child with two Saints, 









424 



LONDON: THE NATIONAL GALL3BK3, 



No. 

Fyt,Jan 1003 

Gaddi, Taddeo, School of 579 

Garofalo 81 

170 

642 

671 

Giorgione 269 



Giotto . . 


• 


. . . 276 


„ School of . 


. . 568 


Gk)es, Van der 


. . . 774 


Gozzpli, Benozzo 


. . . 283 


^» »» 


. . . 591 


Greuze 


. . . 206 


>» 


\ 1 


. . 1019 


»» 


1 A 


. . . 1020 


Guard! . . 




. . 210 


Gaercino . 


» 1 


. . . 22 


Guido Beni 


> 


. . . 177 


^» »> 


> 


. . . 193 


>» »> 


i 1 


. . . 214 


»> »> 


> 4 


. . . 271 


TTackaert and Bei 


•chem . 829 


Hals, Frans . . 


. . 1021 


Heyden, Van der 


. . 866 


M 9* 


. . 992 


t* n 


. . 994 


Hobbema, M. 


. . 685 


>» 


. . . 8H0 


n 


. . . 995 


Uondeooeter . 


. . . 202 


Hooghe, Pieter de 


> . . 794 


w »» 


. . 834 


»» « 


. . 835 


Huysman, 0* • 


. . 954 


Huysum, Van 


. . 796 


>f »» 


. . 1001 


Jardij^ Earel 


du 


. . 827 



Dead Birds, 

Baptism of Christ. 

Vition of 8t. Augustine. 

Holy Family. 

Christ in the Garden. > 

Virgin and Child enthroned with Saint 

A Knight in Armour. — Being the stud 
for the figure of San Liberale in tb 
Gastelfranco altar-piece. . 

Two Apostles. — A fragment of fresco. 

Coronation of the Virgin. 

Madonna, Child, and Saints. 

Madonna and Child EntlironedJ 

The Rape of Helen, 

Head of a Girl. 

Head of a Girl. 

Girl with an AppHe. 

View of Piazza di San Ma/rco, Venice. 

Angels weeping over the Dead Christ. 

The Magdalen. 

Lot and his Daughters. 

The Coronation of the Virgin, 

Ecce Homo, 

Hunting a Stag. . . C 

A Woman's Portrait.. 

View in Cologne. 

Gothic and Classic Buildings, 

Street Scene, 

Landscape — Showery Weather. . 

The Avenue at Middel^rniSj, HsUamd, 

Wood Scene and Cottages, 

Domestic Poultry. 

Courtyard of a Dutch House, . . 

Interior of a Dutch House, 

Court of a Dutch House. 

Landscape, 

Vase with Flowers. 

Vase with Flowers. 

Fording the Stream. ,, 



LONDON: THE NATIONAL GALLERY, 



4^ 



Hardin, Earel du 
Justus of Padua 
Peyser, Th. de 
Zoning, Ph. de . 



Lancret 



Libri, Girolamo dai 
Lippi, Filippino . 



>» 



» 



» 



>» 



»» 



Filippo 



»> 



»> 



Lotto, Lorenzo 



Maas, N. 



»» 



Habase, Jan . 

»» » 
Mantegna, A., and 
scholars 

Maratta, Carlo 
Margaritone of Arezzo . 

Marziale, Marco . 
Master of the Lyvers- 

berg Passion, or Israel 

van Mekenen . 
Matsys, Quintin . 



• • 



„ „ attri- 

. bated to . . . . 
Meire, Van der . 

Melozzo da Forli, attri- 
buted to 



• • 



»» 



Memling, Hans . 



» 



• •• 



No. 

985 Sheep and Goats, 

701 A Triptyck. 

212 Merchant and Clerk, 

836 View in Holland. 

974 Distant View. 

1(U-104. The Four Ages of Man. 

748 Madonna, Child, and St, Antne, 

293 Virgin and Child with Saints. 

592 The Adoration of tke Ma^, 

586 Virgin and Child enthroned with Saints, 

666 The Annunciation. 

667 St. John the Baptist with six Saints. 
699 Portraits of Agostino and.Niccdld deUa 

Torre, 
153 The Cradle, 
159 The Dutch Housewife. 
207 The Idle Servant. 
656 Male Portrait, 
946 Male Portrait, 

274 Virgin and Child enthroned vjith Saints, 

902 TJie Tnumph of Scipio. 

174 Portrait of Cardinal Cerri, 

564 Virgin and Child, — With scenes from 

the lives of Saints. 
803 The Circumcision, 



706 Presentation in the Temple, 
944 The Money-changers. 

295 Salvo tor Mundi and Virgin, 
264 A Cotmt of Hennegau and his Pairon^ 
Saint. 

755 A Femcde Enthroned and. Man KneeUng, 

156 A Companion Subject, 

709 Madonna and Child. 

747 T?ie Baptist and St, Lawrence. 



426 



LONDON: THE NATIONAL GALLERY. 



Memling, Hans, attri* 

bnted to . . . 
HetsQ. G 



M 



» 



Michael Angelo, attri- 
buted to ... . 



^^ 



M 



Miens, Frans van 

„ WiUem yau . 
Morando (Oavazzola) 



w 



n 



Moretto di Brescia . 



»» 



»^ 



»» 



»» 



Moro, Antonio . . 
Morone, Francesco . 
Moroni, Giambattista 



»» 
»» 



»» 
»> 
>» 



»^ »» 

Moncheron . 
Mnrillo • . 



»> 



»> 



Neer, Van der 

»> » 

Netscher, G. . 

»> • 

Qrcagna, Andrea 



>» 



If 



08» Jan van . . 
Ostade, Adrian van 

„ Isaac van 

Pacchiarotto . . 

Padovauino . . 

Paimegiano, or Parme- 

gianino . . . . . 



No. 

686 Virgin and Child, 
838 The Duet. 
889 The Music Lesson, 
970 The Drowsy Landlady, 

790 The Entombment. 
809 Madonna and Child, 

840 A Lady feeding a Parrot, 

841 Fm^-s^o/).— Called Le Choi, 
735 8t. Roch and the Angel, 
111 A Madonna, 

299 Portrait of an Italian NoUeman, 
625 Virgin and Child with Saints. 
1025 Portrait of an Italian Nobleman, 
184 Portrait of Jeanne d^Archel, 
285 A Madonna. 
697 Portrait of a Tailor, 
742 Portrait of a Lawyer, 

1022 Portrait of an Italian Nobleman, 

1023 Portrait of a Lady. 

1024 Pttrtrait of an Italian Ecclesiaslie, 

842 A Garden Scene, 
13 Hoiy Family. 

74 Bust of a Spanish Peasant-boy, 
176 St. John and the Lamb, 
239 Moonlight, 
732 Canal Scene in Holland, 

843 Blowing Bubbles, 

845 Lady at a Spinning-wheel, 
569 Coronation of tlie Virgin. 

570-578. Portions of the same AUar-pieee, 
1915 Fruit, Fhtoers, &c, 

846 The Alchemist, 
963 A Frost Scene, 
246 Virgin and Child. 

70 Cornelia and her Children, 

33 Vision of St, Jerome, 



LONDON: THE NATIONAL GALLEBT. 



427 



No. 

Patinir, J 717 8t John on the Idand of PatmoB, 

Pellegrino da San Da- 

niele 778 Madonna^ Saints^ and Donaior. 

Perugino, Pietro . . . 181 Virgin and Child with 8t, John, 

„ „ . . . 288 In the centre panel Virgin adoring (he 

Infant Christ, St. Michael, and 
St. Raphael with Tobias, on the two 
side panels. 

Piero di Oosimo . . . 698 The Death of Procris, 

Piero della Francesca . 585 Female Portrait. 

„ „ . 758 Femaie Portrait. 

Pinturioohio, B. . . . 911 Return of Ulyasea to Penelope. 

„ ... 912-914. The Story of QrUtlda. 

Piaano of Verona ^ . 776 St. Anthony and St. George. 

Pollajuolo, AntoDio . . 292 Martyrdom of St. Sebastian. 

,1 „ . . 296 Virgin adoring the Infant Christ. 

„ „ . . 781 Angel Raphael and Tobia». 

Pontormo, Jacopo . . 649 Portrait of a YotUh. 

Potter, Paul .... 849 Landscape and Cattle. 
Poussin, Nicolas . ... 40 ^ Land^&ipe. 

„ „ ... 42 J. Bacchanalian Festival. 

,, ,, . . . 62 ^ Ba,cfihanalian Dance. 

Previtali 695 Madonna and Child. 

Raphael . . . , ..213 The Vision of a Knight. 

„ 168 St. Catharine of Alexandria. 

„ 7^ The'' Garvagh " Madonna and Child. 

Rembrandt . , ^ . 45 The Woman taken in AduUerg. 
n r . r . 72 Landscape with Figures. — Small. 

,y .... 190 A Jewish Rahbi. 

„■ .... 221 His own Portrait when old, 

,> .... 243 Portrait of an Old Man. . 

„ attributed to 289 The Night Watch.— A small copy. 

„ .... 672 His own Portrait at 32 years of age. 

„ attributed to 757 Christ blessing Little Children. 

„ .... 775 Portrait of an Old Lady. 

„ .... 850 Male Portrait. 

Rigaud, Hyacinthe . . 903 Cardinal Fleury. 

Romanino, Girolamo 297 The Nativity. 

Romano, Giulio . . . 624 The Infancy of Jupiter, 



428 



LONDON: THE NATIONAL GALLERY. 







No. 


Romano, Giulio, 


attri- 

• 


643-644. Four smaXL Composittons in two 


bated to 


frames. 


Rosa, Salvator . 


• • 


84 Merrury and the Dishonest Woodman. 


» »> 


• ft 


811 Landscape — Tobias and the Angel. 


fioeaelli, Oosimo, 


attri- 




buted to . . 


• • 


227 St. Jerome and other Saints. 


Bottenhammer, J. 


• • 


659 Pan und Syrinx. 


Rubens, P. P. . 


• • 


38 AbdiLction of the Sabine Women, 


» 


• • 


46 Pea^e and War. 


^» • • 


• ft 


57 Conversion of St. Bavon. — Small. 


M 


• ft 


59 The Brazen Serpent. 


»» 


ft ft 


66 Autumn Landscape. 


» 


ft ft 


67 Holy Family and Saints. 


>i 


ft • 


187 Apotheosis of WiUiam the Ta/iitum. — 
Sketch. 


»> • 


ft ft 


194 The Judgment of Paris. 


>» • 


ft ft 


278 The Triumph of Julius Cassar.^Afiei 
Mantegna's cartoon at Hampton 
Court. 


>» • 


• • 


279 Horrors of War. — Study for the large 
work in the Pitti at Florence. 


^» • 


ft • ft 


852 Portrait known as the Chapeau de PoU 
oT Felt Hat 


»i • 


• • 


853 Triumph of Silenus. 


Ruysdael, Jacob . 


ft ft 


854 Forest Scene. 


M » 


• • 


986 Water-mills. 


M » 


ft • 


989 Landscape and Water-mill. 


»> »> • 


• ft 


990 Vieu) over a Stretch of Flat Country. 


Sarto, Andrea del 


• ft 


690 His own Portrait. 


„ attributed to . 


17 A Tfoly Family. 


Rassoferrato . . 


• • 


200 Madonna and Child. 


„' attributed to . 


740 Virgin and Child. 


Savery, R. . . 




920 Orpheus. 


Schalken, G. . . 




997 Wmnan scouring a Kettle. 


»> • 




999 Candlelight. 


Schiavone, G. 




630 Madonna enthroned with Saints. 


Schoen, Martin . 




658 The Death of the Virgin. 



Schoorel, Jan, attri- 
buted to 



• • • 



720 A Repose in Egypt. 



LONDON: THE NATIONAL GALLERY. 



429 



Schoorel, Jan . . . 
Sebcusdano del Piombo . 
attributed to. 






» 



Signorelli, Luca . . . 
Solario, Andrea . . 



>» 



Spagna, I/> 



w 



» 



Steen, Jan .... 
Teniers, Dayid, elder 
„ David, younger. 


»f 


n w 


M 


»^ w • 


>» 


w >» 


»» 


» w 


>» 


n v> 



n 



»^ 



»» 



Terbnrg, G. 

Tintoretto . 
Titian . . 



»» 

»» 

» 



Treviso*, Giiolamo da 



rt 



Tura, Cosimo . . . 



Uccello, Paolo 
Velasquez, Diego 



n 



»» 



Yelde, Adrian van de . 

n n f) • 



No. 

721 A PoHrait 

1 BaiHng of Lazarus, 

20 Portrait of a Lady, 

24 Portraits, 
910 Triumph of Chastity, 
734 Portrait of Cristoforo Longono. 
923 Portrait of a Venetian Senator, 
282 Glorijhation of the Virgin. 
691 EcceHmno. 
856 T;^ MusuMnaster, 
950 Dut<^ Scene — a Contrersa^ioit. 
242 Players at Trictrac. 
805 Jnferior — Woman peeling a Pear. 
817 Chateau of Teniers at Perek, 
857-860. The Four Seasons. 

862 The Surprise, 

863 Dti^es. — Known sa Le Mauvais Ridie. 
952 Village FSte. 

864 r^ Guitar Lesson, 
896 Tfee Peace of Munster, 

16 5^. Gettrge destroying the Dragon, 
4 j5b{]^ Family wi^ a Shepherd adoring, 

34 FentM cmd Adonis. 

35 Ba^t^us aTid Ariadne. 
270 7%e ^oZi me tangere. 

635 Rrgrtn aTid G%t7(7 with St. John and St. 

Catharine. 

636 Portrait of Ariosto. 

623 Madonna and Child enthroned. 
590 ^n Entombment, 

772 Madonna and Child enthroned teith 

Angels. 

773 5i. Jerome. 

683 5a««e o/ fi^. Egidio. 
197 Boar-hunt at Aranjuez. 
232 Adoration of the Shepherds. 
745 ^«8« 0/ P^i7t> J7. of Spain. 

868 Tfte Ford. 

869 Frost Scene. 



w 



99 



» 



490 



LONDON: TEE NATIONAL GALLERY. 



Velde, Adrian van de 



»» 

>» 
>» 



»> 



>» 



n »» 

Willem van de 



99 



>» 

»» 
»> 
99 



t> t» » 

Vemet, Claude J. 
Veronese, P. . 



»» 



>» 



""} 



Yinci, Leonardo da, 

School of . 
Vivarini, Antonio 

„ Bartolommeo . 
Weenix, Jan ... 
Weyden,Rogiervan der, 

elder, attributed to 
Weyden,Eogier van der, 



No. 
867 The Farm Cottage. 

983 Bay Horse, Cow, and Goais. 

984 Cattle. 

149 A Calm at Sea. 

150 A Gale at Sea. 

870 Shipping in a Calm. 

871 A CfUm. 

872 Shipping off the Coast. 

873 Coast of Scheveningen. 
236 Casile of St. Angelo, Rome. 

26 Consecraiion of St. Nicholas. 
•268 Adoration of the Magi. 
294 Family of Darius before Alexander. 

18 Christ with the Doctors. — Generally 
considered as a work of LuinL 
768 St. Peter and St. Jerome. — A fragment. 
284 Virgin and Child with two Saints. 
238 Dead Game and a Dog. 

667 Tfie Deposition. — In tempera on linen. 



younger, attribul 


ted to. 653 Portraits of Himself and of his Wife. 


» 


. . 711,712.-4 Mater Dolorosa and an Ecce Homo. 


«» 


. . 654 The Magdalen. 


Wouwerman, P. . 


. . 878 Halt of Officers. — Sometimes called La 




Belle Laitiere. 


*» 


. . 879 Interior of a Stable. 


»? • 


.. 880 On the Sea-shore. 


M • 


. . 975 i4 Stag-hunt. 


»» • 


. . 976 Battle-piece. 


Wynants, Jan 


. . 971 Hilly Landscape. 


»> >^ 


» 972 Hilly Landscape. 


Zoppo, Marco ' . 


. 597 St. Dominic. 


Zurbaran, F. 


. , 230 A Franciscan Monk, 



LONDON: THE NATIONAL GALLERY. 481 



THE NATIONAL GALLERY AT LONDON. 

Catalogue of 1876. 



Copley, J. Singleton 



>» 



»> 



»» 



» 



Grome, John 



>» 



»> 



»» 



*» 



Gainsborough 



» 



>» 



»♦ 



>» 



w 



M 



»» 



Hogarth, W. 
Boppner, J. 



>^ 



w 



Kneller, Sir Godfrey 
Opie, John 
Reynolds, Sir J. 



ft 



» 



»> 



»^ 



»» 



» 



»» 



>» 



>» 



English Schoch dovm to the Eighteenth Century, . 

No. 
. 100 The Death of Lord Chatham, 
, 733 Death of Major Peirson. 
, 787 Siege and Belief of Gibraltar. 
. 689 Household Beath, 
, 897 View at Sorimch, 
, 926 The Wind-mm. 

80 The Market-iiart, 
. 109 The Watering-place. 
. 309 The Watering-place. 
. 683 Portrait of Mrs. Siddons. 
. 684 Portrait of Dr. Schomherg. 
. 760 Portrait of the Parish Clerk, 
. 789 Portraits of Mr. BaiUie and Family. 
. 9-5 Landscape with View of Comard in 

Suffolk. 
. 112 His own Portrait, 
. 113-1 18. The Marnage a la Mode, 
. 133 Portrait of Mr. Smith. 
. 233 Portrait of William Pitt 
. 900 Portrait of the Countess of Oxford, 
, 273 Portrait of John Smith. 
. 784 Portrait of William Siddons, 

78 Holy Family, 

79 The Graces decorating a Figure of 
Hymen. — Portraits. 

. 106 ^ Man's Head. 

. 107 The Banished Lord. 

. Ill Pf/rtrait of Lord Heathfield, 

. 162 The Infant Samuel, 

, 306 His oijon Portrait. 

. 307 The Age of Innocence. 

. 754 Portraits of tujo Gentlemen, 

, 885 Tlie Snake in the Grass, 



>» 



91 



» 



»> 



»» 



»» 



»» 



M 



>» 



492 



LONDON: THE NATIONAL GALLERY. 



Beynolds, Sir J. 



>» 



»» 



»» 



»» 



» 



Bomney . . 
West, Benjamia 



»» 
»» 






Wilson, B. 



»» 



w 



Wright of Derby 



No. 

887 Dr, Samuel Johnson. 

888 James BoeweU, 

889 His own Portrait, 

891 Portrait of a Lady and Child, 
312 Stttdy of Lady Hamilton, 
121 The Banishment of Cleombrotus. 
126 Pylades and Orestes before Iphigenia. 
181 CJirist healing the Sick, 
108 View near Tivoli, 

110 Landscape — Destruction ofNiobe^s Chil- 
dren, 
302, 308. Views in Italy. 
304 Lalce Avemus, % 

725 Experiment with the Air-pump. 



8T, PETERSBURG: THE HERMITAGE, 



433 



THE PICTUEE GALLEEY OF EUSSIA. 



»o» 



THE GALLERY OP THE HERMITAGE AT 
ST, PETERSBURG. 



Albani, Francesoo ^ 



»♦ 



M 



Albertinelli, Mariotto 
AUori, Christofiuio 



Antolincz, Jose . 



»> 



>? 



attii- 



bated to . . 
Barocci, Pederigo 



>» 



»» 



Bartolommeo, Pra 
Bassano, Leandio 
Bega, Gomelis 



» 



»» 



Bellini, Giovanni 
Bellotto» Bernardo 
Beiohem, NiohdUis . 



»» 

w 

» 

>♦ 
w 
it 
>» 



» 
» 

99 

w 
»♦ 
»» 



Berokheyden . 



n 



No. 

203 The BapHsm of Chriit, 

204 Europa and the BtdL 

21 Holy Family and Sainte, 
248 Judith and Holofemes, — An inferior 
replica of that in the Pitti, No. %. 

397 A Sleeping Christ. 

398 Peasants under a Tree, — Small. 

128 The BiHh of ChrisL 

129 Madonna and Child, 

130 Male Portrait, 

20 Madonna and Child with Angds. 
158 Christ with Mary atuL MarthcL 

970 An Interior, 

971 An Interior. 

4 Madonna and Saints, — Small. 
320 View of the Rialto, Venice, 
1070 The Angels appearing to the Shepherds. 

— ^Large. 
1072 The Rape of Europa.--Large, 
1073, 1074, 1075. IMian Scenes,— iMTge, 

1076 Italian Landscape. — ^Large. 

1077 Italian Landscape. — ^Large. 

1078 Italian Landscape. — ^Large. 

1081 Italian Landscape, — ^Laige. 

1082 Italian Landscape, — ^Large. 
1084 Italian Peasants, — Small. 

1214 Houses on a Canal, 

1215 Hawking Party, 



434 



8T. PETEBSBURG: THE HERMITAGE. 



Bol, Ferdinand . 



Bonifazio Yeneziano 
Bordone, Paris . 

Borsura, Abraham van . 
Botticelli, Sandro, attri- 
buted to . . 
Boucher, Francis 
Bourdon, S^bastien 
Bourguignon . 

»» • • 

Brekelenkamp 

>» 
Bronzino, Angelo 

»» »» 

Brouwer, Adrian . 

»» »» • 

Brueghel, Jan (Velours) 

»» w >» 

Bruyn, Bartholomans 
Cagnacci, Guido . 



• • 



Canale, Antonio . 



»» 



>» 



Oano, Alonso . . . . 



t» 



Quncci, Aimibale 



No. 

845 Portrait of {he Countess of Nassau- 

Siegon. 
848, 849. Portraits of a Man and his Wife. 

850 Male Portrait. 

851 PoHrait. 

852 Portrait 

853 Portrait. 

854 Portrait. 

109 TJie Adora^tion of the Shepherds. 

110 Madonna and Saints. 

111 Portraits of a Lady and Child. 
1362 StiU-life. 

3 Adoration of the Kings. — SmalL 
1486 A Holy Family. — ^Large. 
1421 The Beam of Dido. 

1530 Study for a Battle-piece. 

1531 Study for a Battle-piece. 

927 A Hermit. 

928 Interior and StiU-life. 

124 A Portrait. 

125 A Portrait 
937 Tupo Figures. 

941 Peasants in a Kitchen. — And others. 

513 Landscape. 

514 Landscape. 

470 Portraits of a Man and his three Sons. 

471 Portraits of the Wife and one Daughter. 
194 Mary Magdalen carried to Heaven by 

six Angels. 

318 The Reception of Count Gergi at Venice. 

319 The Marriage of the Doge with the 

Adriatic. 
852 Madonna and Child. — ^A good replica 

of the Madonna in the Seville 

Cathedral. 
854 Madonna and Saints showing a Friar 

how to paint a picture of St, Dotmnie. 
166 Anointing the Dead Christ. 



OT. PETER8BUEG: THE HEBMITAGE. 



435 



Caracci, Annibale . . 


» 


t% • 


>» 


»» • 


»» 


»» 


»» 


>» 


»» 


»» 


>* 

n 


Lodovioo 



Garavaggio,!! (Amcrighi) 



>» 



»» 



Oardi. L. (II CigoU) 



»»• 



»» 



** 



»» • 



tt 



»» 



Castillo, Antonio del 
Catena, Yinoenzo 
Champaigne, P. de 
Chardin, Sim^a . 



tt 



M 



Christns, Peter . 



Clouet, Francois . . 
Coello, Alonso Sanchez 

„ Clandio . . 
Cornelia van Haarlem 

»> ♦> 

Correggio, Ant. . . 



» 



M 



» 



t» 



Cortona, Pietro da . 



w 



»» 



Cranach, Luoas, elder . 
>» »» »» 

Grayer, Gkttpar de . . 



No. 

169 Eoly Family. 

172 Dead Christ and Angels. 

173 The Women at the Sepulchre, 

174 Christ and the three Maries, 
176 His own Portrait. 

Ill A Sleeping Maiden. 

178 A Landscape. 

165 Christ hearing the Cross. 

215 Christ croumed with Thorns, 

216 The Crucifixion of St. Peter, 

217 Boy playing on a Guitar. 

218 Study of a Head. 

244 David with the Head of Goliath, 

245 Tobias a'nd (he Angel. 

246 The Circumcision of Christ. 

247 The Marriage of St. Catharine. 
357 The Visitation. 

9 Madonna and Saints. 
664 Moses with the Tables of the Law. 

1513 The Blessing. 

1514 The Washerwoman. 

44 A Crucifixion and the Last Judgment, 
— Two wings of a triptych. 
1487 Portrait of a Young Man, 
402 Portrait of a Princess. — The face ap- 
pears to have been retouched. 
431 His own Portrait. 

505 The Baptism of Christ, 

506 Subject from the Decameron. 

81 The Madonna " del Latte." 

82 Study for the ^Assumption' in the 

Dome of the Cathedral at Parma, 
82a a Mythological Subject, — Small. 

280 Christ and the Magdalen. 

281 The MaHyrdom of St. Stephen. 

459 Madonna and Child under an AppU'tree. 
461 Life-size Venus and Cupid. 
262, 263, 264. Portraits, 
598, 599. Portraits, 

2 F 2 



436 



ST. PETERSBXntG: THE HERMITAGE, 





No. 


Crespi, G. M. 


. . 313 Holy Family, 


tt • 


. . 314 T^ Death of St Joseph. 


Ciiyp, Albert . . . 


. . 1101 Cows and Water. 


>» »» • • 


. . 1102 Sea and Boats. 


- w • • 


. . 1104 Coups and Water. 


fy w • • 


. . 1105 Horses. 


» >» • • 


. . 1106 Moonlight at Sea. 


w w • • 


. . 1107 Covjs. 


Denner, Balthusar 


. . 1284-1288. Portraits. 


Dietrich . . . 


. . — Several works. 


Dolci, Carlo . . 


. . 252 T^e Magdalm. 


V n • • 


.. 25^ St. CathaHne. 


>» >• • . 


. . 255 St. Cecaia. 


Domenidimo . . 


. . ISO A Cupid. 


,, attributed to 179 Assumption of St. Mary Magdalen 


Dow, Gerard . . 


. . 90S The Quaek and Patient. 


w » • • 


. . 904 The FishseOer. 


?» » • • 


,. 905 The FishseOer. 


»» »» • • 


. . 906 His oum PoHrait. 


»> M • • 


. 907 Portrait of a Man with a Book. 


»> »t • • 


. . 910 Finitihed Study of a Nuds. 


y» tt • • 


. . 911 Finished Study of a Nude. 


>♦ tf • • 


. . 912 Finished Study of a Nude.— Audi. 


Ducq, J. le . . 


. . 933 Interior of Stables.— J urge, 


>» 


. . 934 Interior. 


» 


. . 935 Interior. 


♦t « • 


. , 936 Interior. 


Dusart, Comelin . 


. . 966 Cottage and Donkey. 


Dyck, Anton van 


. . 603 Holy Family. 


»» V 


. . 607 T^ Ineredulity of St. Thomas. 


»» »» 


.. 608 The MaHyrdom of St. Sebastian. 


ft ff 


. . 609 FftU'lengih PoHrait of Charles I. 


ft ff 


. . 610 FuH-lengih Portrait of Henrietta 1 


?» ft 


. . 611 Portrait of William of Orange as 


ft ff 


. . 612 PoHraU of Archbishop Laud. 




original is at Lambeth. 


>» f> 


. . 614 Study for (he Family Picture 




Herberts aJt Wilton. — ^Another 




the poasession of Lord GarnaTv< 



8T. PETER8BDB0: THE HERMITAGE. 



437 



Dyck, 


Anton van 


n 


» 


»» 


>» • 


»> 


>» 


»» 


»> 


n 


w 


» 


J> 


»> 


J» • 


n 


» • 


j» 


» • 


»» 


>» • 


V) 


»» 


» 


5> • 


»» 


»» • 


>» 


>» • 


•» 


»> • 



Eeckhout, G. van den . 



>» 



*> 



»» 



n 



>5 



»» 



Escalaute, Juan Antonio 
Everdingen, A. van . 



»» 



»» 



Eyck, Jan van 
Faes, P. van der 



?♦ 



» 



Feti, Domenioo 



w 



>» 



Flinok, Govert 



Francia, Francesco . 



Fyt, Jan 

Garofalo, 

(Tisio) 



» 



Benvenuto 



» 



No. 

615 Portrait </ Earl Danby. 

616 Portrait, 

617 Portrait of Sir Thomas Wharton, 

618 Portraits of two Children of the Wharton 

Family. 

620 PartraU of Sir TJwmas ChaUoner. 

621 Portrait of Lord Wandesford. 

622 3fafo PortraU. 
624 Portrait of a Lady. 
626 Portrait of Inigo Jones. 
628 Portrait of a Young Man. 
630 3fafo PortraU. 

632 JUTaZe Por^ratY. 

633 Portraits of two English Ladies. 

634 Portraits of two English Ladies. 

635 Sitting Portrait of a Lady and 

Child. 

636 Naked Boys lilowing Soap-hvhbles. 
638 Portrait of an Ecdesiastic. 

753 A Candlelight Subject. 

837 Cro&sus and Solon. 

838 Alexander and the Family of Darius. 
840 Interior with one Figure. 

433 St. Joseph and Infant Christ. 
1133 A Water-faU. 
1135 A Bough Sea with Boats and Town. 

443 The Anntmciaiion. 

643 Small full-length Portrait. 

644 SmM full-length Portrait. 

233 Jlfa(2o7ina. 

234 Adoration of the Shepherds. 

842 William III. as a Youth with his master 
Ja>odb Cats. 

68 Madonna and Child. 

69 Mad(mna Enthroned and Saints. 
1334 Fruit, dtc. 

59 The Adoration of the Shepherds^ 

60 Holy Family. 



\ 



438 



8T. petehsbvug : the hermitage. 



Garofalo, Benventito. . 
Giordano, Luca . . . 



»» 



»» 



» 



i> 



• » • 



• » k 



Goltzius, Hendrik 

Goyen, Jan van . 

>» » • 

Granacci, Francesco 

Grenze, J. B. 

>» 
Guercioo . 

» • 

Gyselfl, Pieter 

Hackaert, Jan 
Hals, Frans 
»> »» 

» n 

w n 

Heem, J. D. de 



>» 



»j 



♦> 



» 



Heemskerck, Martin 
Heist, B. van der 



» 
» 



» 



van 



Herrera (el Mozo) 



Heyden, Jan van der . 



ff 



» 



No. 

61 Christ hearing the Cross and other 

Figures, 
291 A Pieta. 
298 A Sleeping Bacchus toith Nymphs and 

AnimaU, 
294 TAe Judgment of Paris — a replica of 
No. 441 at Berlin. — Another large 
work without a number. 

495 Adam and Eve, 

496 Baptism of Christ. 
1126 Sea-piece, — Large. 
1129 The Skaters. 

22 Madonna and Saints adoring the Infant 
C%rwf.— Said to be by Ghiilandajo, 
according to C. and 0. 

1520 The Death of the Paralytic. 

1580 Head of a Youth. — And others. 

239 Assumption of the Virgin. 

240 Martyrdom of St, Catharine, 

241 St, Jerome, 

1351 Fruit-piece on a Terrace. 
1161 A Wood and Hunters. 

770 A Male Portrait. 

771 A Male PoHrait, 

772 A Male Portrait, 

773 A Male Portrait. 

774 Portrait of a Young Man in Armour. 
1353 Still-life. 

1355 FUmers. 
1375 Still-life. 
490 A Crucifixion and Donators. 

777 Group of Portraits. — Life size. 

778 A Family Group. — ^Life size. 

779 A Family Group. — Life size. 
— Several portrait busts. 

389 Virgin and Saints instrtict a Friar houf 

to paint a portrait of St. Dominic. 
1207 Houses and Figures. 
1210S Vieu) oj a Twhu. 



8T. FETERSBTJRQ: THE HERMITAGE. 



439 



Heyden, Jan van der 



M 



» 



>» 



» 



No. 

1209 Houses and Figures. 

1210 Houses and Trees on a Canal. 
1218 Jjandscape with Chateau. 



Holbein, Hans, younger. 



attributed to . . 


. 465 Portrait of Erasmus. — Life size. 


Holbein, School of . 


. 467 Small Portrait of Edward IV. 


Hondeooeter, M. . 


. 1339 Poultry. 


n • 


. 1340 Poultry. 


» 


. 1344 Poultry. 


Honthorst, Gerard , 


. 746 Christ before the High Priest. 


» » 


. 752 Woman Spinning. 


» »> 


— Several portraits. 


Hooghe, Pieter de 


. 860 On a €rarden Terra^ie. 


n n 


. 861 An Interior. 


» JJ 


. 862 WoTnan making Lace. 


Horebout, Gerard 


. 458 A Pieta, surrounded by flowers. 


Hnysnm, J. van . . 


. 1378 Flower-piece. 


» >f 


, . 1379 Flower-piece. 


Janssons, G. . . 


641 Portrait of a Lady. 


Jardin, Karel dn . 


. 1091 Landscape and Animals. 


Jones, Thomas 


. . 1393 JEneas and Dido. — ^A landscape. 


Jordaens, Jacob . 


. 647 Paul and Barnabas at Lystra. 


>j » 


. 649 Diana and Nymphs. 


» » 


. . 650 Fable of the Man and Satyr. 


»> »> 


. 651 Portraits of his Family. 


» >» 


. . 652 A Family Group. 


• 


. 653 His own Portrait. 


Juanes, Vicente . 


. . 328 St. Anna. 


M » 


. . 329 St. Dominic. 


Kalf, W. . . . 


. . 1369 StiU'life. 


EaufEinann, Angelicf 


i . 1304-1306. Small works. 


Eeyser, Thomas de 


. . 7SS A PoHrait. 


Kneller, Sir G. . . 


. 1388 Head of Locke. 


w » • 


. . 1389 Portrait of Gibbons the Sculptor. 


Lancret, Nicolas . 


. . 1506 The Song. 


»> M 


. . 1507 A Fite.—lATge. 


» » 


. . 1508 Nymphs Bathing. — Large. 


» » 


. . 1510 Two Figures. 


Largillibe . . 


, . 1537 A Conference. 



440 



8T, PETERSBURG: THE HERMITAGE, 







No. 


Leal, Joan de V aides . 


391-393. Small works. 


M >♦ »» 


»• 


394 A Female Bead. 


I^ Brun . . . 


• •• 


1454 Christ on the Cross. — Small. 


Lingelbaoh . . 


• • 


1272 Market-place of an Italian Tovm. 


n ♦. . 


•*• • 


1276 Mounted Horsemen. — And others. 


Lombard, Lambert 


• • 


491 Adoration of the Kings. 


Loo, Jacob van . 


• • 


1252 On a Terrace. 


»» M »♦ • 


• • 


1253 Interior. 


Lorraine, Claude (GeMe) 


1428 Landscape — Morning. 


>♦ ry- 


W 


1429 Landscape — Noon. 


>♦ »» 


ff 


1430 Landscape — Evening. 


»» »' 


Vi 


1431 Landscape — Night. 


»» »> 


W 


1438 Landscape with Figures. 


»» »» 


»> 


1439 Landscape leith Figures. 


Lotto, Lorenzo 




115 A Male PoHrait 


Luini, Bernardino 


• 


71 Madonna and ChUd. 


?» »» 




72 St. Cathanne. 


>» >♦ 




IS St.. Sebastian. — A portrait. 


>» ♦♦ 




74 The Colurnbine.—A lovely girl. 


Luti. B. . . . 




289 Boy playing on a Lute. ' 
857 Interior— Mother and Child.. 


Maas, Nicholas . 




Maratta, Carlo- . 




297 Adoration of the Shepherds. 


M >» 


•h * 


300 Holy Family. 


»» »♦- 




304 Virgin and Child.— A copy of Guide. 


>» >♦ 




306 Holy Family. 


»» »« 




307 PoHrait of Clement IX. 


Matsys, Quintiu . 




449 Madonna in Glory with Saints and 
others below. 



Meer, J. van der, of 
Delft, attributed to 
by Dr. Waagen 

Mengs, Anton R. 



»» 



>» 



Metsu, G. 



»> 



>» 



Menlen, A. F. van der . 



1338 Gam£ with a Cat and Bog-. 

1298 John the Baptist. — Life size. 

1801 Perseus ar^ Andromeda. — ^Life size. 

1302 The Judgment of Paris.— lAie size. 

1303 His own Portrait. — And others.. 
878 Siek Woman and Doctor. 

880 Lady eating Oysters. 

881 Family at a Meal. 

728, 729. Battfe-p»ece«.— Large. 



8T. PETERSBURG: THE HERMITAGE, 



441 





No. 


Mierevelt .... 


. 740- 


Miens, F.^Tftn, elder 
„ J. van 


. 916 
. 918 
. 1241 


„ W.yan . . 


. 1242 


Mignon, A. . . . 
Morales, Lmsde. . 

» jj - • 
f> » • • 

Moreelse, P. . . . 

Moretto .... 


. 1245 
. 1358, 
. 400 
. 401 
. 402 
. 744. 
. 112 


„ .... 


. 113 


Moro, Antonio . . 
Moroni, G. . . . 


. 480 
. 481 
. 154 


Moucheron » 


. 1169 


Moya, P. de . 
Munllo .... 


. 358 
. 360 


„ , • .. . 


. 361 


„ .... 


. 362 


„ .... 


. 363 


„ .... 


. 366 


„ • • . • 


. 367 


„ ..... 


.. 370 


» .... 


. 372 


w ..... 


. 373 


w .... 


. 374 


» • • • . 


. 375 


»> .... 


. 376 


»» . . * .. 


. 377 


>» .... 


. 378 


„ . . .. » 


. 379 


w .... 


. 380 


Neefs, Pieter, elder . 
Neer, Artua van der . 


. 1201 
. 1117 



-743. PoHraits, 

Interior-^Lady and Gentleman, 

Portrait of a Lady, 

Surgeon dressing a Wound, 

Abraham turning away Ha^ar, 

Two Women, 

1359. Flower-pieces. 

Virgin and Child, 

Virgin and Child, 

JTie Mater Dolorosa, 

745. Portraits. 

Judith and Holof ernes. 

Faith. — A fine female portrait. 

Portrait of Sir Thomas Gresham. 

Portrait of his Wife, 

Portrait, 

Landscape, 

A Female Saint, 

Isaac blessing Ja/iob, — Chiefly land- 
scape. 

The Annunciation, 

A Conception, 

Adoration of the Shepherds^ 

St, Joseph and Infant Christ, 

A Holy Family, or Repose in Egypt, 

A Crucifixion, — Small. 

The Deliverance of St. Peter,. 

St. Anthony and Infant Christ, 

Death of the Inquisitor Don Pedro 
Arbuez, 

Two Heads behind a Graiiug, 

A Boy and Dog, 

Peasant laughing at a Dog. 

Girl with Fruit, 

St, John and the Lamb, — Go^^ of No& 
176 in the National Gallery, London. 

Three Saints. 

Interior of a Church, 

Canal and Mills, 



442 



ST. PETERSBURG: THE HERMITAGE. 





No. 


Neer, Arias van der . . 


1119 Moonlight 


99 >f >» • • 


1120 Moonlight. 


">» 99 »» • ■• 


1121 Moonlight. 


■»» w >» • •• 


1122 Skating, 


»» w ^ • ■• 


1123 Moonlight 


» W w • • 


1124 Moonlight 


Netscher, Oonstantm 


888 A Portrait 


M Gaspar . ^ 


882 Portrait of Queen Mary of Orange, 


»f j> • • 


883 Portrait of the Painter, 


» » -. ■* 


884 Portrait of a Lady. 


Oclitervelt, Jacob . . 


889, 890. Figures in a Gateway. 


>f » 


892 Tujo Figures, 


Cost, J. van, elder . . 


663 Virgin and Child adored by Donai 


Orley, B. van . •. . 


474 A Descent from the Cross, 


Ostade, Adrian van . . 


945 Peasants with Music and Dancing. 


M ■>»»>•• 


947-950. Four single Heads. 


W W » • • 


951-954. Interiors.— And others. 


„ Isaac van . . 


962 Landscape with Figures. 


Palma, J. (Vecchio) , . 


90 Adoration of the Shepherds. 


f> » • • 


91 Holy Family and St Catharine, 


» j> • • 


92 Holy Family and Saints. 


Fareja, J. de . , . . 


427 A Portrait 


Piombo, Seb. del . . 


17 Christ and €he Cross. 


99 » • • 


18 The Deposition, 


>» » • • 


19 Portrait of Cardinal Pole. 


Poel, Van der . . . 


978 Interior and StiU-life. 


Poelenburg, C. . . . 


757 Repose in Egypt, — Large. 


» ... 


761 Diana and Callisto. — And others. 


Pordenone, Giov. An- 




tonio 


116 Portraits of a Man and Wom^n, 


„ attributed to . 


117, 1 18. Decorative Pictures, 


Pordenone, Bernardino 




da • 


119 Adoration of the Magi. 


>f ' • 


120 Group of Portraits. 


Potter, Paul . . . . 


1051 A Landscape and Animals. 


j> » • • • • 


1055 A Dog and Kennel. 


» » • • • • 


1056 Landscape, 


ff 99 . . . . 


1057 Small Bull. 


99 99 • * • * 


1059 Hiftlory o/ a Hunter and his Dogs. 



ST. PETERSBURG: THE HERMITAGE. 



443 



PourhnR, F. 


• 






Poussin, Nicolas 






n n 






»» » 






» » 






Procaccini, Camillo 
„ Giulio Ce 


sare 


Pynacker, Adam . 


■ • 


n >' 


» • 


Kaphael Sanzio . 


• 


?> »> • • 


• 


Hapbael Sanzio, at1 
buted to . . . 


> • 

kri- 

• 


» 


• • 


Rembrandt 


• 


>» • • 




» 


B 


1 




»♦ " 








»» 




• 




w 








»» 








» 








f> 








»> 








w 








» 








»t ' 








»» 








» 






.' ' . 



No. 

487 Three Head9, 

488 Three Heads, 

1394 Moses striking the Rock, 

1398 Holy Family, 

1400 Tnwwip^ of Neptune and Amphitrite, 

1413 Landscape and Figures, 

1414 Landscape and Figures. — And otbers. 

262 Holy Family and Angels, 

263 Madonna and Child, 

264 Marriage of St. Catharine, 

1162 Barge on Smooth Water, 

1163 Italian Scene, 
1165 Landscape. 

37 Virgin, Child, and St Joseph — Imbarhe. 

38 Virgin, Child, and St, John — Madson 

d'AJbe, 

39 SL George and the Dragon, — SmalL 

40 A PortradL 

47--55. Frescoes, — Probably designed by 
Eaphael and executed by G. Bo- 
mano and others. 

791 Abraham entertairdng the Angels. — 

Large. 

792 Sacrifice of Isa,a>c — Large. 

793 The Coat of many Colours brought to 

Jacob. 

794 Joseph and Potiphar^s Wife, — Medium. 

796 Holy Family. 

797 Return of the Prodigal. — Large. 

798 Parable of the Labourers, — SmalL 

799 Denial of Peter. — Large. 

800 Descent from the Cross, — Medium. 

801 Incredulity of St. Thomas, — Small. 

802 A Dana>e. — ^Large. 

803 Asking a Blessing. — Small. 
805 An Old Woman. — Large. 

807 Mother of the Pa4Wcr.— Small. 

808 Portrait of Koppenol, 



444 



8T. PETERSBURG: THE HERMITAGE. 



Bembrandt 



w 
>» 

»» 
» 
w 
rr 
w 
»» 
» 
»» 
» 

» 

»> 

f9- 



Beni, Guido 



>» 


» 


»» 


w 


» 


» 


>» 


» 


>» 


» 


»f 


»» 



Beynolds, Sir Joshua 



»■ 



»» 



w 



>» 



Bibalta, F. de . . . 



» 



• «. 



Bibera, Jos^ 



» 



f> 



»» 



» 



» 



>» 



•■ •. 



Bigaud, H 

RincoD, Ant. del, attri- 
buted to 



• • » • 



No. 

809 Man in Armour. 

810 Portrait of an Old Man. 

811 His own Portrait. 

812 A Jewish Bride. 

813 Portrait of a Man in a Turban. 

814 ^ tmaXL Portrait. 

817 P(yrtraU of Us TFiye.— SmaU. 

818 Portrait of an Old Man. 

819 Portrait of a Woman. 

820 Portrait of Manasseh Ben Israsl. 

821 Portrait. 

823 Portrait of a Woman. 
826 Child with a Broom. 

829 Portrait of a Woman. 

830 A Landscape. 

831 A Seorpiece with Boats. 

833 Lady with a Glass. — And others. 
181 David and Goliath, 

183 Adoration of the Kings. 

184 8t. Joseph and Infant Christ. 

185 Madonnttj Child, and 8t. Francis. 

186 St. Peter. 

187 IHspute of the Fathers of the Chur 
191 The Youthful Virgin with Maiden 

1390 Venus and Cupid. 

1391 Infant Hercules strangling the Ser\ 

— Large. 

1392 The Continence of Scipio. 

338 Meeting of Saints Anna and Joa>cl 
34:0 Mary Mo/gdalen and Apostles o 
Tomb. 

330 St., Seba^ian taken down 

Death.. 

331 St. Sebastian after Martyrdom, 

332 St. Jerome. 
833 St Jerome^ 

1538 A Portrait. 

3i5 Virgiu aui Child, 



ST. PETER8BUBG: THE EERMITAGE. 



445 



Boelas, J. de las 
Bomano, Ginlio 



r* 



n 



n 



Bombouts, T. 



»» 



Bofla di TivoU 
Boea, Salvator 



w 
>» 
»> 
»> 



»> 
»» 



Bottenhammer 
Bnbens, P. P. 



»> 

»> 
r* 
>f 

r» 
n 
n 
n 
n 
w 



w 



» 



No. 

347 Comntttnton o/ i9<. Ti^e«a. 
43 A copy of the Leigarto Holy Family 
of Raphael at Madrid. , 

56 A M€id<mna, 

57 A MddonncL 

601 Group of Card-players, — Life size. 

602 Group in a Kitchen, 

1280, 1281. Landscapes and Cattle. 

220 The Prodigal Son,— Itaige. 

221 Odysseus atuL Nausicaa, 

222 Democritus, 

223 Group of Soldiers, 

224 il Porfroie. 

225 A Portrait 

226 -4 TFarrtbr. 

510, 511. Small works. 

535 Turning away of Hagar. 

536 Adoraiion of the Kings. — ^The Virgin is 

a portrait of Helena FOunnent. 

540 Madonna and Saints. 

541 Madonna and Child ioith Saints. — 

Large. 
543 Christ in the House of Simon, — ^Large. 
546 Descent from the Cross. — ^Large. 

549 Venus and Adonis, — Small. 

550 Ba,cchus and Nymph. — Large. 

551 Drunken Silenus. — Small. 

552 Perseus and Andromeda. — Small. 

554 Abundance and River Tigris. — Large. 

555 Rape of Sahines, — Large. 

559 Portrait of Philip TV. 

560 Portrait of Elizabeth of Bourbon. 
561-566. Sketches for Triumphal Arches. — 

Made in 1635 for the entry of the 

Lifante Ferdinand of Spain into 

Antwerp. 
557, 569, 570, 572. 573, 590, 593. Studies 

for Large Works. 
575 Seated Portrait of his First Wife. 



446 



8T, PETERSBURG: THE HERMITAGE, 





No. 


Rubens, P. P. . . . 


. 576 FuU4ength Portrait of his Secor, 




. Wife. 


w . . . 


578 Portrait of a Lady. 


>» . . . 


580 Male Portrait. 


» • • • 


581 l^Wale PoHrait. 


»> • . . 


, 584 ^ FTeoci. 


w . . • 


591 Satyr and Nymph — Portrait of Helei 




Fourment. 


» • • • 


592 Lions Fighting. 


w • . . 


594 Landscape with Figures by Moonlight 


n . . . 


595 Landscape and Rainbow. 


Ruysdael, J. . . . . 


1136 Landscape with Water. 


» 




, 1138 Landscape with Water. 


w 




. 1139 Landscape with Waier. 


w 




. 1142 Landscape with Water. 


»» 




, 1143 Landscape, 


w 




. 1144 Landscape. 


>» 




, 1145 Z^ndsoope. 


»» 




. 1147 Mountain Scenery. 


»» 




. 1148 Country Road. 


Sarto, Andrea del . 


24 J7oZ^ Family and Saints. 


» >»»»•• 


25 iSf*. Barbara. 


BaflAofeirato . . 


. 257 FiVgfin an<Z C%t7d. 


„ attributed to 


259 Virgin and Child. 


Schalken, G. . . . 


923 Tie Herring-seller. 


Schedone, B 


266 Join tie Baptist. 


w •■ • • 


271 Diana and Actxon. 


»> ... 


. 272 Cupid Reclining. 


Scbiavone, Audrea . 


121 Jupiter and lo. — Landscape. 


>» r» 


122 Madonna enthroned. 


Schoorel, Jan . . 


478 Portrait of a Man. 


»» »j • ' 


479 Portrait of his Wife. 


Sirani, Elisabetta 


. 199 il 5u5/ec< after Guido. 


»» » • " 


, 200 Jn/on< Christ. 


Snyders, Frans . . . 


1312 Frtwf-aeZZer.— Life size. 


» w • . . 


1313 Fegreto62e-«eZZer.— Life size. 


»> w . . . 


1314 Fishrseller.^Ufe size. 


f9 » t . . . 


1315 Game-seller.— lAfe size. 


W 99 


• • 


. 1311 Swan and other Game. 



8T, PETERSBURG: THE HERMITAGE, 



447 







No. 


Snyders, FiaoB . 


• 


. 1320 The FUh'Stda.—lMe size. 


99 » • 


• 


. 1824 A ConceH of Birds. 


SiaTeren, J. A. . 


* 


, 926 The Herring-seller, 


Steen, Jan . . 


• 


, 895 Esther before Ahasuerus, 


» »♦ • ' 


1 


. . 896 Interior and Figures, 


»» » • ■ 


« 


897 Music in a Garden, 


»♦ »♦ • • 


• 


, 898 Interior with Man and Woman. 


» w • • 


• 


. 899 Figures — January and May, 


99 99 • ' 


« 


. 901 Feast and Music. 


Strozzi, B. 


I * 


. 219 Tobias. 


Teniers, Dayid, el 


der 


, 669 Cottage and Landscape. — ^TArge. 


» 99 


*» 


. 670 Cottage and Landscape, — Large. 


^ y< 


>iiii] 


^r. 672 Feast of the Archers and Halberdiers at 
Antwerp. — His masterpiece. 


»» »♦ 


»♦ 


. 673 The Guard-room. 


>» w 


♦♦ 


674 A Kermess, 


»» w 


M 


675 A Kermess. 


w w 


»» 


. 677 A Bridal Feast, 


» »♦ 


» 


, 683 Landscape. 


»» »» 


»♦ 


. 684 Village Dance. 


»» » 


»♦ 


. 688 Card-players. 


»» w 


♦* 


697 Interior and a Figure. 


»» »♦ 


»♦ 


, 699 Kitchen of his Chateau at Perek, 


99 99 


W 


, 700 House and Farmyard, 


»♦ »» 


*» 


, 706 Farmyard and Animals. 


» W 


99 


707 Farmyard and Animals, 


>» »♦ 


♦♦ 


. 710 8ea-port and Ships, 


M »♦ 


»♦ 


. 685, 686, 689, 690-696. Small works. 


Terbupg,G. . 




. , S7l The Violin-player. 


»♦ 




872 The Letter and Messenger. 


»» • 




. . 873 The Letter and Messenger. 


»♦ 




. , S7i The Guitar Lesson. 


»» 




, , 875 Two Figures, 


♦♦ 




. . 876 ^ Portrait, 


Tiepolo, G. B. 




., 317 The Banquet of Cleopatra. 


Tintoretto. . 




. . 132 Birth of John the Baptist. 


»f • 




. . 133 Study for the 'Paradise * in the Dncal 
Palace at Yenioe. 



418 



ST, PETERSBURG: TEE BERMITAGE. 



Tintoretto. 



Titian 



79 
»» 

99 
99 
»» 



•79 



attribnted to 
Tristan, Luis . . , 
Utrecht, Adrian van. 
Vaccaro, Andrea . . 
Valentin, Moise . 



97 



Velasquez, Diego 






)9 
»» 



M 



»> 



»» 



Velde, Adrian Tan de 



>» 



>» 



79 



79 »» 

Veronese, Paolo . 


T» 


»» 


»» 




Tt 


>» 




»» 


»» 




» 


»» 




» 


»> 




>» 


« 




W 


W 





No. 

134 St. George and the Dragon. 
185 Perseus and Andromeda. 
— Several Portraits. 

93 Virgin and Child in an Arched Recess. 

95 Head of Christ. 

96 Madonna, Child, and youOi/til Magdalen. 

98 Ma^fdaZen. — Replica of that at Naples. 

99 Venus with Looking-glass and Cupids 

— *^Barherigo Venus." 
102 Portrait of PdHamdno. 

104 Head of Lavinia. — After that at Berlin. 

105 The Mattresse de Titian. 
109 A Dana^e. 

94 An Ecce Homo. 

413 Portrait of Lope de Vega. 
1350 Fruit. 
290 Mary Magdalen. 

1490 Two Soldiers Gaming. 

1491 Two Soldiers Playing. 

418 Study from life of Innocent X. for the 

Portrait in the Doria, Rome. 

419 FuO-length Portrait of Philip IV. 

420 Head of PhUip iT.— A replica of 

similar heads in the National Gkdlerj, 
London, and at Madrid. 

421 FuHAength Portrait of Duke Olivares, 

422 Head of Duke Olivares.. 
1062 Landscape and Cows. 
1184b Calm Sea-piece. 

1185 River and Seorpiece. 

138 Finding of Moses. — SmalL 

139 Small work. 

140 Repose in Egypt. 

143 A Banquet. — Small. 

144 Christ on the Cross. — ^SmalL 

145 A Pielh. 

146 Holy Family and St. Catharine. 
149 Small work. 



8T, PETERSBURG: THE HERMITAGE. 



449 





No. 


Veronese, Paolo . . 


. 150 Small work. 


w n ' ' 


. 151 Mars and Venus. 


f9 » • ' 


. 152 Male Portrait. 


Verrocchio, Andrea . 


1 Madonna Enthroned with Angels. 


Vinci, Leonardo da, 


at- 


tributed to . . . 


13a Madonna and Child. 


„ . . . 


14 Virgin^ Child, and two Saints. 


„ . . . 


15 Ntide Bust of a Woman. 


Walker, Robert . 


9 

. . 1386 Portrait of Cromwell. 


Watteau . . . 


. 1503 The Lute-player. 


Weenix, Jan . . . 


. 1347 Dead Game. 


yt »» • • 


. . 1348 Dead Game. 


>* »» • • 


. . 1349 Game. 


Werff, A. van der 


. . 984 ^ Group. 


» >» 


. . 986 Christ brought before the People. 


»» »» 


. 987 A Deposition. 


» » 


. 988 A Deposition. 


» >» 


. 990 A Magdalen Reading. 


»> >» 


. 992 Mis own Portrait. 


Wouwerman, Ph. 


. . 995 Chase of the Cat. 


>» 


. 996 Riding Party. 


»> 


. 998 TTawking Party. 


w 


. . 1001 Interior of a Stable. 


>» 


, • . 1002 A Group. 


99 


. 1006 Single Horseman. 


99 


. . 1007 Village Inn. 


99 


. . 1017 Landscape. 


9* 


. 1021 Battle-piece. 


99 


. . 1024 Battle-piece. 


99 


. 1025 A Group of Horsemen. 


99 


. . 1027 The Trumpeter. 


M 


. 1029 TTawking Party. 


M 


. . 1030 Small Group. 


«» 


, . 1033 The Ford—HawUnq. 


99 


. . 1034 Landscape and Hunting Party, 


M 


. . 1035 Death of the Deer. 


9» 


. . 1037 Small Group. 


99 


. . 1043 The Ford.— And others. 



2 G 



450 



ST. PETEESBURG: THE HERMITAGE. 





No. 


Wynants, Jan 


. 1112 Country with Trees. 


>» >» • 


. 1113 Country with Trees. 


» »» 


. 1114 Landscape. 


»» »» • < 


, . 1115 Landscape. 


>» »» • " 


. 1116 Landscape. 


Zurbaran, F. . . . 


. 348 r^c Child-Virgin Praying. 


»» • • 


. . 349 >§<. iairrewce.— Large. 



( 451 ) 



INDEX. 



A. 

Abate, Niocol6 dell', Works of, 277, 

312 
Adriaenssen, Alexander, 129 
Aelst, W. van, 170 ; Works of, 326, 

342 
Aertsen, Pieter, Works of, 304 
Albani, Francesco, 80; Works of, 

258, 267, 296, 304, 342, 392, 393, 

433 
Albertinelli, Mariotto, 37; Works 

of, 261, 263, 267, 290, 356, 393,433 
Allan, David, 251 
AUori, Cristofano, 86 ; Works of, 

263, 267, 356, 364, 393. 420, 433 
Alsloot, Van, Works of, 304 
Alt«lorfer, Albrecht, 185; Works of, 

324, 326, 356, 362 
Alunno, Niccolb, 26; Works of, 

258, 275, 282, 287, 291, 393, 420 
Amberger, C, 182 ; Works of, 294, 

305, 324, 326, 353, 364 
Amsterdam — 

Six Van Hillegrom, 314 
Town Hall, 316 
Trippenhuis Museum, 309 
Van der Hoop Museum, 313 
Van Loon Collection, 316 
Angelico, Fra, 9; Works of, 261, 

263, 267, 287, 288, 291, 326, 353, 

356, 380, 393, 420 
Anselmi, Michael Angelo, Works 

of, 393 
Antolinez, Jose, Works of, 433 



Antonello da Messina, 17, 107; 

Works of, 297, 302, 326, 342, 353, 

365, 393, 420 
Antwerp, Museum, 302 
Arcagnolo — see Orcagna. 
Aretino — eee Spinello. 
Arezzo, Margaritone d', 3; Works 

of, 425 
Art, B. van. Works of, 326 
Arthois, J. d*. Works o*, 305 
Aspertini, Amico, Works of, 258 
Asselt, Van d*, 101 ; Works of, 317 
Augsburg, Gallery, 324 
Avanzi, Jacopo, 8; Works of, 258, 

287 

B. 

Backhuizen, 169; Works of 309, 

312, 313, 316, 317, 336, 365, 400, 

420 
Bagnacavallo, Works of, 342 
Baldovinetti, Alesso, Works of, 353 
Balen, Hendrik van, 129 

„ J. van. Works of, 365 
Barbieri — see Guercino. 
Baroccio, Fedfrigo, 74, 86; Works 

of, 268, 291, 342, 393, 420, 433 
Barry, James, 248 
Bartolo, Taddeo di. Works of, 295, 

326 
Bartolommeo, Fra, 36; Works of, 

261, 264, 268, 280, 288, 289, 290, 

326, 393, 433 
Basaiti, Marco, 21 ; Works of, 297, 

365, 421 

2 G 2 



452 



INDEX. 



Bassano, Francesco, Works of, 380 
„ Jacopo, II, 70 : Works of, 

268, 275, 299, 300, 326, 342, 348, 

365, 378. 380, 393, 416, 421 
Bassano, Leandro, Works of, 301, 

380 433 
B jttoiii, P. G., Works of, 342 
Bazzi— «ec Sodoma. 
Beceafumi, Works of, 264, 294, 295 
Becerra, 195 
Beechey, Sir William, Works of, 

416 
Beerstraten, Works of. 322 
Bega, Comelis, 153; Works of, 268, 

309, 313, 326. 336, 353, 400, 433 
Beham, Bartholomaus, 186 ; Works 

of, 320, 356, 363 
Beham, Hans Sebald, 185 
Belgium, Galleries of, 302 
Bellini, Gentile, 20, 53; Works of, 

257, 275, 281, 286, 377, 393 
BelUni, Giovanni, 20, 50, 53 ; Works 

of, 257, 268, 275, 279, 291, 297, 

326, 342, 353, 364, 365, 380, 393, 

421 433 
BeUinI, Jacopo, 20; Works of, 297 
Bellotti, Bernardo, 93; Works of, 

275, 296, 300, 334, 341, 343, 356, 

378, 433 
Beltraffio, 34 ; Works of, 326, 393, 

421 
Benedetto, Diana, Works of, 297 
Berchem, 164 ; Works of, 305, 309, 

314, 317, 326, 342, 356, 365, 378, 
392, 400, 413, 421, 424, 433 

Berckheyden, G«rrit, 170 ; Works of, 

315, 353, 433 

Berckbeyden, Job, 170; Works of, 

313, 322, 342 
Bergamasco — see Lotto. 
Bergamo, Accademia Oarrara, 257 
BerUn, Museum, 825 
Berruguete, 194 
B^o, Francia, Works of, 264, 326, 

342 
Bissolo, Works of, 297, 421 
BJake, WiJJiam, 250 
JfJes, H, de, Worka of, 365. 380 



»» 
» 



Bloemart, 170; Works of, 317 
Boccaccino, Works of, 421 
Bookman, Works of, 416 
Bol, Ferdinand, 138; Works of, 305, 
309, 316, 317, 322, 326, 334, 342, 
353, 400, 421, 434 
Bologna, Pinacoteca, 258 

School of, 14th century, 8 
„ 15th century, 29 

„ 17th century, 75 

Bologna, Jacopo da, 8 

„ Matteo da, 8 ; Works of, 
259, 298 
Bologna, Simone da, 8 ; Works of, 

259 
Bonconsiglio, Works of, 257, 298,342 
Bonfigli, Benedetto, Works of, 282 
Bonifazio Veneziano, 60 ; Works of, 
264, 265, 268, 273, 275, 277, 286, 
287, 297, 298, 300, 326, 342, 365, 
393, 434 
Bono, Ferrarese, Works of, 421 
Bononi, Carlo, Works of, 260 
Bonsignori, 25 ; Works of, 275, 300, 

301, 421 
Bordeaux, The Museum, 390 
Bordone, Paris, 65 ; Works of, 264, 
268, 271, 273, 287, 288. 298, 326, 
327, 342, 365, 393, 416, 421, 434 
Borgognone, 34; Works of, 257, 

326, 393, 421 
Borsum, A. van, Works of, 434 
Bosch, Works of, 380 
Both, Andries, 161 ; Works of, 302, 
305, 309, 312, 313, 317, 327, 356, 
400, 413 
Both, Jan, 161 ; Works of, 302, 305, 
309, 312, 313, 317, 322, 327, 342, 
356, 400, 413, 421 
Botticelli, Sandro, 11 ; Works of, 
262, 264, 268, 294, 296, 326, 327, 
342, 353, 356, 393, 421, 434 
Boucher, Fran9ois, 226 ; Works of, 

334, 406, 410, 411, 412, 434 
Boullongue, Bon, 230; Works of, 

406 
Bourdon, S^astien, 221 ; Works of, 
309, 320, 336, 406, 412, 421, 434 



INDEX 



453 



Bourgeois, F., 251 

Bourguignon, 230 ; Works of, 324, 

365, 406, 434 
Bouts, Dicrick, 110 ; Works of, 302, 

308, 327, 356, 421 
Bramantino, Works of, 421 
Bramer, L., Works of, 365 
Bray, Jan de. Works of, 316, 416 
Brekelenkamp, 170 ; Works of, 313, 

315, 384, 392, 411, 434 
Brescia, A. B. di— 8ee Moretto. 

„ Galleriu- Tosi, 260 
Bril, Matthew, Works of, 342 

„ Paul, 116 ; Works of. 290, 327, 

342, 356, 400 
Broederlum, 102 
Bronzino, Angiolo, 40 ; Works of, 

262, 264, 268, 327, 393, 422, 434 
Bi-ouwer, Adrian, 142; Works of, 

268, 309, 334, 336, 353, 392, 400, 

411,413,434 ' 
Browne, Alexander, 251 
Brueghel, Jan, 115 ; Works of, 268, 

275, 296, 305, 309, 317, 319, 324, 

327, 342, 343, 356, 365, 379, 380, 

381, 390, 392, 400, 434 
Brueghel, Pieter, elder, 114 ; Works 

of, 268, 305, 341, 356, 365, 380, 416 
Brueghel, Pieter, younger, 115 ; 

Works of, 305, 327 
Bruges — 

Academy, 303 

Museum, Hospital of St. John, 
304 
Brussels, Musee National, 304 
Bruyn, Bart., 183; Works of, 305, 

327, 340, 343, 353, 434 
Bugiardini, G., Works of, 258, 268 
Buonarroti — tuee Michael Angelo. 
Burgkmair, Hans, 182; Works of, 

324, 327, 343, 356, 362, 366 
Burse, Jacques de, 102 

0. 

Caen, Hotel de Ville, 390 
Cagnacci, Guido, 85 ; Works of, 284, 
285, 377, 393, 434 



Cairo, Francesco del. Works of, 275 
Calcar, J. von. Works of, 327 
Caliari — see Veronese. 
Calvaert, D., Works of, 343 
Campi, Giulio, 86 
Carapidoglio, Works of, 416 
Canaletto, 92 ; Works of, 257, 268, 

277, 296, 327, 341, 353, 356. 366, 

378, 393, 416, 422, 434 
Cano, Alonso, 200; Works of, 327, 

343, 356, 380, 381, 388, 389, 434 
Cantarini, Works of, 343, 393 
Capelle, Van de, 169 ; Works of, 334, 

366, 422 
Oaracci, Agostino, 76 ; Works of, 258, 

280, 356, 366 
Caracci, Annibale, 76 ; Works of, 

258, 260, 268, 280, 287, 289, 327, 

341, 343, 366, 393, 422, 435 
Caracci, Ludovico, 76 ; Works of, 

258, 280, 356. 366, 394, 422, 435 
Caravaggio, Da, 88, 197 ; Works of, 

273, 277, 287, 290, 291, 327, 343, 

366, 377, 378, 394, 422, 434, 435 
Cardi, L.. 86 ; Works of, 262, 264, 

268. 435 
Carducho, V., Works of, 343 
Cariani, Works of, 257, 276, 327 
Caroto, 25 ; Works of, 277, 300, 301, 

327 
Carpaccio, 22 ; Works of, 261, 276, 

298, 327, 353, 366, 394 
Carrefio. Juan de — see Miranda. 
Casanova, 230 ; Works of, 407 
Casentino, Jacopo di. Works of, 422 
Cassel, Gallery, 336 
Castile, School of, 212 
Castillo, Antonio del. Works of, 435 
Catalogue to Galleries of — 
Amsterdam, 309 
Antwerp, 302 
Augsburg, 324 
Bergamo, 257 
Berlin, 325 
Bologna, 258 
Bordeaux, 390 
Brescia, 260 
Bruges, 303 



454 



INDEX. 



Catalogue to QvXiehea— continued. 

Brussels, 304 

Oien, 390 

Cassel, 336 

Cologne, 338 

Darmstadt, 339 

Dresden, 341 

Dulwich, 413 

FeiTara, 260 

Florence, 261, 263, 267 

Frankfort, 353 

Genoa, 273 

Haarlem, 316 

Hague, 317 

Hampton Court, 416 

Leiden. 322 

Lille, 390 

London, 420 

Lyons. 390, 392 

Madrid, 380 

lilantua, 274 

Marseilles. 391 

Milan, 275 

Modena, 277 

Montpellier, 391 

Munich, 356 

Naples, 278 

Nuniberg, 362 

Padua, 281 

Paris, 392 

Parma, 281 

Perugia. 282 

Pisa, 283 

Borne, 283 

Rotterdam, 322 

Seville, 388 

Siena, 294 

St. Petersburg, 433 

Stuttgart, 363 

Turin, 296 

Urbino, 297 

Valencia, 389 

Venice, 297 

Verona, 300 

Vienna, 364 
Catena, Works of, 257, 298, 327, 343, 

CaraJJiui, 4 



Cavazzola, 26; Works of, 300, 343, 
426 

Cavedone di Sassuolo, Works ofi 
258, 278 

Caxes, Eugenie, Works of, 381 

Century, Definition of, 1 

Century, Thirteenth^ Italian School 
of, 2 

Century, Fourteenth, Schools of: 
Italian, 4; Flemish, 101; Ger- 
man, 174 

Century, Fifteenth, Schools of: 
Italian, 8; Flemish, 102; Ger- 
man, 175 ; Dutch, 132 ; Spanish, 
193; French, 215 

Century, Sixteenth, Schools of: 
Italian, 35; Flemish, 111; Ger- 
man, 178 ; Dutch, 134 ; Spanish, 
194 ; French. 216 ; English, 233 

Century, Seventeeniht Schools of: 
Italian, 75: Flemish, 116; Ger- 
man, 188 ; Dutch, 136 ; Spanish, 
212 ; French, 216 ; English, 234 

Century, Eighteenth, Schools of: 
Italiun. 92 ; German, 189 ; Span- 
isli, 2J2; French, 226; English, 
237 

Cespedes, Pablo de, 196 

Ceulen, C. J. van. Works of, 343, 353 

Champaigne, Philippe de, 128; 
Works of, 305, 366, 390, 400, 411, 
422, 435 

Chardin, J. B., Works of, 378, 407, 
412 

Chardin, Simeon, 227; Works of, 
391, 392, 413, 435 

Chiinenti, Jacopo, Works of, 268 

Cliristus, Petrus, 105; Works of, 
327, 353, 381, 435 

Chronological Tables of Painters: 
Dutch, 171 ; English, 252 : Flem- 
ish. 130 ; French, 231 ; German, 
192; Italian, 95; Spanish, 214 

Cignani, Carlo, Works of, 343, 366 

Cimabue, 2 ; Works of, 262, 394, 422 

Cima da Conegliano, 21 ; Works of, 
258, 276, 278, 281, 298, 301, 327, 
\ ^kZ, S53, a56, 366, 394, 422 



INDEX, 



455 



Cinquecento, Definition of, 2 
„ Masters of, 85 

Claude, 219; Works of, 269, 278, 

280, 284. 288, 290, 305, 327, 346, 

356, 382, 408, 413, 422, 440 
Clouet,Fmn9ois,216; Works of, 328, 

ai3, 353, 366, 407, 417, 422, 435 
Clouet, Jean, elder, 216 

„ „ younger, 216 

Cochereau, Works of, 407 
Cock, M., Works of, 366 
Cocques, 128 ; Works of, 319, 422 
CoeUo, Claudio, 212 ; Works of, 435 

„ Sanchez, 195 ; Works of, 305, 

366, 385, 435 
Colle, Raphael del. Works of, 293 
Cologne, School of, 310 

„ Wallraf-Richartz Museum, 

338 
Conixloo, C. van. Works of, 305 
Cooper, Samuel, 234 
Copley, John S., 247 ; Works of, 431 
Comelisz — see Haarlem. 
Correa. D., Works of, 381 
Correggio, 70; Works of, 268, 278, 

279, 281, 285. 288, 328, 343. 344, 

366, 377, 381. 394, 422, 435 
Cortona, Pietro da, 84; Works of, 

367, 396, 435 

Cosimo, Piero di, 16 ; Works of, 271, 

328, 396, 427 
Cossa, Francesco, Works of, 258 
Costa, Lorenzo. 30 ; Works of, 259, 

328, 394, 423 
Cousin, Jean, 216 ; Works of, 407 
Coxcie, Michael van, 103, 112; 

Works of, 302, 305, 328 
Coypel, Antoine, 230 : Works of, 407 

„ Noel, 230 ; Works of, 407 
Cozens, John, 251 
Cranach, Lucas, elder, 186 ; Works 

of, 269, 281, 290. 302, 305, 324, 

328, 336, 340, 344, 356, 357, 362, 

363, 367, 400. 423, 435 
Cranach, Lucas, younger, 188 ; 

Works of, 340, 362 
Crayer, Gaspard de, 127 ; Works of, 

305, 309, 367, 401, 435 



Credi, Lorenzo di, 13; Works of, 

262, 269, 284, 296, 328, 344. 357, 

394, 398, 423 
Cremona, School of, 17th century, 

86 
Crespi, G. M., Works of, 436 
Crivelli, Carlo, 22 ; Works of, 257, 

276, 291, 300, 353, 423 
Crocefissi, 8 

Ciome. John, Works of, 481 
Crosse, Lewis. 251 
Cuyp, Albert, 161 ; Works of. 305, 

309, 313, 315, 318, 322, 828, 334, 

344. 353. 857. 390, 401, 413, 423, 

436 

D. 

Dance. Nathaniel, 251 

„ William. Works of, 417 
Darmstadt, Gallery. 339 
David, Gherardt, 110; Works of. 

328 
David, Jacques Louis, 229 ; Works 

of, 407 
Deelen, Dirk van, 170 ; Works of^ 

367, 423 
Delphius, Works of, 322 
Deiiner, Balthasar. 189 ; Works of, 

269, 328, 344. 357, 401, 411, 417, 

436 
Desportes, Fran9ois. 227 ; Works of, 

407, 408 
Diepenbeck, Van, 129; Works of, 

367 
Dietrich. Christian, 189 ; Works of, 

314, 423, 436 
Divino, El — see Morales. 
Dobson, William, 234; Works of, 

417 
Does, J. van der. Works of, 364 
Dolci, Carlo, 87 ; Works of, 262, 

261, 288, 336, 344, 367, 389, 413, 

436 
Donienichino, 77; Works of, 259, 

264, 269, 276, 285, 289, 290, 291, 

344, 377, 394, 413, 423, 436 
Donieuico Veneziano, Works of, 

269, 299 



456 



INDEX. 



Dossi, Dosso, 48 ; Works of, 261, 264, 
269, 275, 276, 278, 305, 328, 344, 
394 417 

Dow, GerMrd, 148 ; Works of; 269, 
305, 309, 312, 313, 315, 318, 328, 
344, 353, 357, 367, 378, 391, 401, 

413, 414, 423, 436 
Dresden, lioyal Gallery, 341 
Duccio, 3 ; Works of, 294 
Ducq, A. le. Works of, 379 

„ J. le. Works of, 328, 401, 436 

Dughet, Gaspar, 219 ; Works of, 264, 
283, 288, 305, 344, 357, 381, 391, 
414 423 

Dulwich, Gallery, 413 

Durer, Albrecht, 183 ; Works of, 257, 
264, 269, 270, 284, 286, 309, 334, 
336, 344, 353, 357, 363, 367, 381, 
398, 423 

Dusart, 154 ; Works of, 309, 312, 315, 
344, 367, 379, 392, 414, 436 

Dutch School, 305 

Dyck, Anton van, 124; Works of, 
264, 269, 273, 274, 276, 284, 286, 
287, 296, 302, 305, 309, 313, 320, 
324, 325, 328, 334, 336, 389, 344, 
354, 357, 368, 377, 378, 381, 401, 

414, 417, 423, 436, 437 

E. 

Eclectics, The term, 75 

School of Bologna, 75 
School of Cremona and 
Milan, 86 
Eclectics, School of Rome, 86 
Eeckhout, G. van der, 160 ; Works 

of, 322, 328, 341, 354, 379, 437 
Elzheimer, 188; Works of, 401, 423 
Engelbertsz, 133 ; Works of, 322, 423 
England, Galleries of, 413 
„ Painting in, 233 
Es, Van, Works of, 367, 378 
Escalante, J. A., Works of, 437 
Espinosa, Jacinto, Works of, 389 
£:88en, Jan van, 129 ; Works of, 381 
Eusebio di S. Giorgio, Works of, 
282 






Everdingen, Van, 170 ; Works of, 

318, 328, 354. 437 
Eyck. Hubert van, 102, 132, 176; 

Works of, 280, 305. 328, 329 
Eyck, Jan van, 103, 104 ; Works of, 

302, 303, 305. 328. 329, 334. 344, 

354, 368, 381, 390, 402, 417, 423, 

437 

F. 

Fabriano. Gentile da, 17 ; Works of, 

262, 276, 298, 344, 398 
Fabritius, Karel, Works of, 322, 339 
Faes, P. van der. Works of. 437 
Falcone, Aniello, 90; Works of, 381 
Farinalo, P., Works of, 368 
Febvre, Claude de, Works of, 408 
Ferrara, Ateneo, Works of, 260 
., School of, 15th century, 

24 
Ferrara, ScLool of, 16th century, 

47 
Ferrara, Stefano da, 24 
Ferrari, Gaudenzio, 34; Works of, 

276, 394 
Feti, Domenico, 87 ; Works of, 344, 

368, 394, 437 
Fiesole— gee Angelioo, Fra. 
► Fiorenzo di Lorenzo, Works of, 282, 

329 
Fiori, Mario, Works of, 285 
Flanders, Painting in, 101 
Flatman, Thomas, 251 
Flemish ScIjooI, Works of, 306, 367 
Flinck, G., 139; Works of, 306, 309, 

329, 334, 344, 345, 368, 402, 437 
Florence — 

Accademia, 261 
Pitti Palace, 263 
Uffizi, 267 
Florence, School of, Early (see 

Tuscan), 24, 47 ; Works of, 354, 

398 
Floris, Frans, 113 ; Works of, 806, 

329, 368 
Fogolino, Marcello, Works of, 257 
Foppa, Vincenzo, Works of, 257, 

^1^, ^\ 



Wnii n ietlStioxaa. 

.. Vsoiiiet, Jam, 21St Worbg 0^,106 

Vt^Muaxd, Honor^ 226 ; VtoiriB of, 

Cannae, Golleriea of, 390 
„ Feinting isrSlS 

Fmiceacii, Fiuru dulU, 18 ; .Wotka 

ot; 264, 271, 427 
FranceBohini, Wurkeof, 315,.ST6 
Fiafida, Frsncebco, 29; Works c 
257. 259, 269, 276. 278, 282, 28. 
296, S29, 315, 354, S57, 35S, 368, 
,V,38*, 417, 423,437 ' 
! FKucia, Oiatumu, Vloika o^ 



Fntnoo, B4^iBta,.Woika«f, 3 



Piueli, Heiu;, 249 
;;P3rt,Jttii,123i Works of, 296, 802,. 
829, S35, 345, 398, 368, 379, 881, 
!. 38^ 402, 111, 124, 437 



Oaddl, A«nolo, S; WofkB of, 398 
„ Taddeo, ; Woika of, 262 
320, 394, 424 
'Oainahoroiigh, Thomas, 242; Works 
.. - et, 414, 417, 4Sl 
G*roblo, 48; Works of, 361. 264, 
2?e, 280, 235. 287, 288, 1^98, 345, 
854,394,424,437,438 
: €«lder, A. vu, Worki of, 378 
0«Me — MsCUnde. 
Genoa, PaltLzzo Brignoli, 273 
Gentd, Uato, Works of, 417 
Genuanj, GollerieB of, 321 
„ Painting in, 174 
GbirlandaJD, , Xlopenioo, 11, 37; 
. .-Works pf, 262; 285, 269, 294, 329, 
345,358,39* " ' 

Ghiilandajo, Bidglfo, Works of, 269 



Giordano, Luua, 91 ; Works oi; 280, 

298, 345, 358, 36S, 882, SMt'488 
Giocgione, 50, 53 ; Works o^ 257, 
265, 269, 278, 286, 815, 8CS, 368, 
369, 382, '391, 417, 424 ' .ir 
Giotteaohi, The, 5 
Gidttino, 6 ; Works of, 269 
Giotto di Bondone, 4 ; Works of, 

262,276,358,395,124 - r 
Giovanni, H&tteo di, Woika of, 
■ 294 ■■ 
Gjrtin, Thomas, 251 
Ginnta-^-ciii P!muo. 
Goes, Hngo' ran der, 106:;WorkB 

of; 269, 290, 369, 421 ' 
QoltziUs, Hendrik, Works of; 138 
Gomez, Bebsatian, 211 
GosBBert, Jan — tee Maboso. 
Goja, 212 ; Works of, 382, 398 
Gojen,Van, 162; Woite of, 809, 
312, 322, 335, 34S, 354.368,1369, 
402,438 •■•■ 

Gozaoli, Beuozzo, 15 ; Works o^ 283, 

395, ^ai' ;' 

Granaooi, Franceaoo, 14 ; Works of, 
829,138 ' ' , 

Grandi, Eroole, Works of; 345 

Greco, II, 196 

Gienze, 228; Works of, 329, 345, 
391, 408, 412, 417, 424,438 

Guardi, Franoesco,' 93; Works of; 
257, 395, 410, 424 ■ ■ 

Quercino, 82-; Works ot 259, 265, 
269, 278, 276, 278, 287, 283^ 291, 
306, 345, 369, 382, 395, 896, 411, 
424,438 

Guido da Siena, 2 

Quido, 'Bbni, 78 ; Works of; 259, 
266, 271, 277, 27^ 280, -384, 288, 
290, ^1, 32d, 349, 369, 872, 377, 
382,414,417.424,444 

GjsiH P., Works o^ 306, 311, 488 



Haulem^ 

' Hoffa van Bereatni, 317 
ToimItll,816 



458 



INDEX. 



Haarlem, Gomelis van, 135 ; Works 

of, 809, 316, 317, 818, 828, 382, 

417 435 
Haarlem, G. yan, 132; Works of, 

358, 869 
Hackaert, 170 ; Works of; 310, 321, 

829, 424, 438 
Hagae — 

Boyal Museum, 317 
St^ngracht Collection, 821 
Town Hall, 321 
Hals, Frans, 136, 142; Works of, 

802, 806, 310, 312, 813, 315, 316, 

317, 322, 329, 335, 336, 345, 354, 

358, 369, 377, 402, 411, 417, 424, 

438 
Hals, Frans, younger. Works of, 

835 
Hamilton, J. G., Works o^ 369 
Hampton Court Collection, 416 
Hayman, Francis, 242, 251 
Heda, Works of, 341, 345 
Heem, Cornells de, 140 ; Works of, 

306, 818, 346 
Heem, Jan de. Works of, 806, 810, 

835,346 
Heem, Jan D. de, 140 ; Works of, 

296, 818, 322, 346, 354, 369, 879, 

882, 402, 417, 438 
Heemskerck, Martin, 134; Works 

of, 317, 417, 438 
Heere, L. da, Works of, 417 
Heerschop, H., Works of, 329 
Heist, Van der, 138 ; Works of, 265, 

806, 310, 316, 318, 323» 346, 402, 

417, 438 
Herrera, El Mozo, 199; Works of, 

888 438 
Herrera, El Vlejo, 199, 201 ; Works 

of, 388, 399 
Heyden, Van der, 168; Works of, 

269, 310, 316, 318, 336, 346, 402, 

424, 438, 439 
HUliard, Nicholas, 233 
Hire, L. de la, 230; Works of, 408 
Hobhema, 166; Works of, 306, 312, 
313, 315, 323, 329, 346, 354, 364, 
363, 398, 402, 414, 424 



Hoeckgeest, 170 ; Works of, 318 
Hogarfli, William, 237; Works oL 

431 
Holbein, Hans, elder, 178; Works of,. 

325, 354, 369 
Holbein, Hans, younger, 178; 

Works of, 265, 269, 281, 282, 296, 

298, 302, 306, 320, 325. 829, 885,. 

337, 340, 346, 354, 358, 863, 369, 

379, 402, 414, 417, 418, 439 
Holland, Galleries of, 309 
„ Painting in, 132 
Hondecoeter, Melchior, 141 ; Works 

of, 265, 306, 310, 318, 386, 346, 

354, 364, 369, 379, 391, 418, 424,. 

439 
Hondius, Abraham, Works of^. 

323 
Hone, Nathaniel, 251 
Honthorst, Gerard van, 146 ; Works 

of, 269, 329, 346, 402, 418, 439 1 
Hooghe, Pieter de, 149 ; Works of, 

310, 313. 315, 316, 321, 329, 858, 

402, 424, 439 
Hoogstraten, 170; Works of; 813, 

369 
Hoppner, John, 245 ; Works of, 418, 

431 
Horemans, Pieter, Works of, 270 
Horembout, Gerard, 106, 233; Works- 

of, 439 
Hoskyns, John, 233 
Hudson, Thomas, 238 
Hugtenburg, 170 : Works of, 306 
Huysmans, Cornells, 129 ; Wotks of;. 

391, 424 
Huysum, Jan van, 141 ; Works of, 

265, 302, 306, 310, 313, 816, 318, 

329, 335, 346, 370, 379, 390; 402,, 

414, 424, 439 

I. 

Imola, Innooenzio da, 47 
Italy, Galleries o^ 257 

„ North— «cc Tuscan, Yenioe, 

&c. 



INDEX. 



^59 



J. 

Jaoobello del Fiore, 18 ; Works of, 

298 
James, Works of, 418 
Jameson, George, 251 
Janssen, Gomelis, 170, 233 ; Works 

of; 439 
Jardin, K. du — see Earel. 
Jenras, Charles, 236 
Joanes, Vicente, 194 ; Works of, 346, 

382, 389, 439 
Jones, Thomas, Works of, 439 
Jordaens, Jacob, 124; Works of, 

302, 306, 310, 337, 339, 346, 358, 

370, 379, 382, 403, 439 
Jouvenet, Jean, 230 ; Works of, 408 
Justus of Ghent, 106 ; Works of, 297 
Justus of Padua, Works of, 425 

K. 

Kal^ Willem, 140 ; Works of, 310, 

323, 346, 354, 358, 403, 411, 439 
Earel du Jardin, 165; Works of, 

810, 312, 318, 329, 379, 402, 414, 

424, 439 
Eaufmann, Angelica, 190; Works 

of, 346, 358, 418, 439 
Eeyser, Thomas de, 137 ; Works of, 

806, 310, 318, 329, 335, 341, 425, 

439 
Knapton, Works of; 418 
Kneller, Sir Godfrey, 235; Works 

of, 325, 418, 431, 439 
Koln, Wilhelm von, 174; Works of, 

338, 339, 341 
Eoning, Jacob de. Works of, 323 
Eoning, Philip de, 168 ; Works of, 

310, 312, 354, 425 
Eoning, Salomon, 170; Works of, 

315, 329, 330 
Eidmbach, Hans yon, Works of, 330 

L. 

Laer, P. van, 170 
Lairesse, J. G. de, 129 
Lancret, 226; Works of, 330, 346, 
408, 412, 425, 439 



Lanfranoo, Giovanni, 83 ; Works of, 

270, 280, 287, 346 
LargiUito, 224 ; Works of, 405, 412, 

439 
Leal, J. de Valdes, 211 ; Works of, 

351,440 
Le Brun, 222 ; Works of, 330, 858, 

379, 406, 407, 410, 414, 440 
Leiden, L. van, 133 ; Works of, ^0, 

322, 330, 340, 354, 358 
Leiden, Stedelyk Museum, 322 
Lely, Sir Peter, 235 ; Works of, 418, 

419 
Lemoine, 230 
Lens, Bernard, 251 
Leonardo — -see Vinci. 
Leux, Works of, 870 
Liberale, 25 
Libri, G. dai, 25; Works of,.30l, 

330, 425 
Licinio — «ee Pordenone. 
Lille, The Museum, 390 
L*Ingegno, Works of, 395 
Lingelbach, 168; Works of, .-310, 

812, 318, 403, 440 
Lippi, Filippino, 12 ; Works of, 262, 

270, 330, 346, 358, 425 
Lippi, Filippo, 11; Works pf, 262, 

265, 270, 330, 354, 358, 395, 425 
Livens, Works of, 296 
Lochner, Stephan, 175; Wor^ of, 

338, 340, 345 
Lodi, Calisto di. Works of, 257 
Lombard, Lambert — see Suster- 

mann. 
Lombardy, School of, 30 
London, National Gallery, 420 
Longhi, Pietro, Works of, 419 
Loo, Charles van, 224; Works of, 

408 
Loo, J. B. van, 224 ; Works of, 408, 

440 
Lorenzetti, Ambrogio, 3 ; Works of, 

262, 294, 295, 330 
Lorenzetti, Pietro, 3; Works -oft 

294 
Lorenzo di Niccolb, Works of, 263 ' 
Lorraine — see Claude. .' 



460 



INDEX. 



Lotto, lioreazo, 62 ; Works of; 257, 
260, 265, 270, 276, 286, 288, 289, 
330, 358, 370, 382, 395, 419, 425, 
440 

Lontherboorg, P. J. de, 251 . 

Luini, Bernardino, 32 ; Works of, 
270, 275, 276, 370, 382, 395, 440 

Luti. B., Works of, 440 

Lyons, The Musemn, 390 

M. 

Haas, Nicholas, 152; Works o^ 
306, 310, 312, 313, 315, 316, 321, 
330, 346, 358, 403, 411, 425, 440 

Mabuse, Jan, 111, 233; Works oi^ 
302, 306, 330, 337, 358, 359, 870, 
403 419 425 

Macriiio d^Alba, Works of, 296, 354 

Madrid — 

Academia de San Fernando, 380 
The Museum, 380 

l^nardi. Works o^ 398 

Malwel, Jean, 101 

Manni, Giamiccola, Works of, 283 

Mansueti, Works of; ^1, 298 

Mantegna, Andrea, 23; Works of, 
257, 270, 274, 276, 282, 291, 298, 
330, 354, 359, 370, 382, 395, 425 

Mantoyano, Works of, 274 

Manila — 

OasteUo di (Dorti, 274 
Duc^ Palace, 274 
Palazzo del 1%, 274 

Maratta^ 0^ 81; Works of; 306, 
346, 370, 377, 395, 425, 440 

If^os Yenetus, Works of, 258 

Margaritone d'Arezzo, 3 ; Works of, 

li^kriotto — see Albertinelli. 

l^rSeilles, Gallery, 391 

Martini, Simone, 6; Works o( 270, 

2df3, 295, 302 
ftarziale, Marco, Workis of, 258, 298, 

425 
Masaodio, 10 ; Works of, 268, 270, 
^9 
Maaoliho, 10 ; Woiks of, 859 



Master of 'Death of the Virgin,' 

176 ; Works oU 330, 338, 354, 370 
Master of Liesborn, 176 
Master of Lyyersb^g 'FiEQasion,' 

176 ; Works of, 338, 339, 425 
Matsys, Quintin, 111; Wbrki of, 

288, 302, 330, 3Si5, 346, '359, 403, 

425 440 
Mazo,'Del, 206 ; Works 6f,'383 
Mazzolino, Ludovioo, Works 61^261 
Mazzuoli — ^800 Parmegianino. 
Meokenen, Israel von, 176r; Works 

of, 363 
Meer, Jan van der, 156 : Works of; 

313, 314, 315,' 318, 823, ^3^, 346, 

347,399,440 _ 
Meert, P., Works of; 306 
Meire, Van der, 106 ; Works 6^' 425 
Melone, Works of, 257 
Melozzo da .^orli, 16; Works of, 

290, 291, 329, 425 
Memling, Hans, 108 ; Works' oi^i 270, 

288, 296, 30a, 3i^, 303, 864, 307, 

330, 340, 347; 354, 359, 88jy370, 

403, 425, 426 
Memmi, Lippo, 6; Works '^ 270, 

294 
Mengs, Qaphael^ 190; Works of, 

284, 359, 383, m 
Metsu, Gabriel, 151 ; Works'b^ 270, 

307, 310, 314, 316, 318, dtS, 880, 

335, 337, 347, 359, 370, 39^ 403, 

426, 440 
Meulen, Van der, 129^'^0rk8 of, 

307, 847, 408, A) 
Michael Angel(^:35, 87, 6B-i- Works 

of, 265, 270. 280, 293, 426 
Michele, LamoeiriiiiLS 
Mierevelt, M. TftttTiSD i^Ma of, 

281, 310, 318, 328, 330, 441 
Mierevelt, P., Works olT, 347 
Miens,' Frans vftn;-' elder, 153; 

Works of, 970, 296, 310, 312, 818, 

828, 347, 359, 370, 891, 408, 426, 

441 
Miens, FiaxiB van,' yoongiar, 153; 

WorkBoi;814,887 
\ 'ilL\jbive^ 3 . vui^ W6rkH Of; 4^1 



INDEX, 



461 



Mieris, Willem van, 153 ; Works of, 

307, 310, 347, 403, 426, 441 
Mignard, Pierre, 223; Works of, 

270, 330, 383, 408, 409 
Mignon, A., 140 ; Works of, 310, 

812, 314, 347, 359, 379, 403, 441 
Milan, Ambrosiana, 275 

„ Brera, 275 

„ School of, 86 
Milano, Giovanni da. Works of, 262, 

270 
MiUet, Francois, Works of, 354 
Miranda, De, 211 ; Works of, 327, 

881 
Modena, Galleria Estense, 277 

„ School of, 14th century, 8 
Modena, Bamaba da, 8 ; Works of, 

283, 353 
Modena, Tommaso da, 8 ; Works of, 

278 
Mol, P. van. Works of, 411 
Mola, Francisco, Works of, 288, 

395 
Molenaer, Works of, 323 
Monnoyer, 227 ; Works of, 419 
Montagna, Bartolommeo, 25 ; Works 

of, 276, 298, 301, 330, 398 
Montpellier, Musee Fabre, 391 
Morales, Luis, 194 ; Works of, 347, 

380, 383, 399, 441 
Morandi, Paolo — see Gavazzola. 
Moreelse, 135 : Works of, 311, 318, 

339, 347, 441 
Moretto, II, 62, 64 ; Works of, 260, 

270, 273. 276, 279, 291, 298. 330, 

347, 354, 359, 870, 377, 395, 426, 

441 
Morland, George, 250 
Moro, Antonio, 113, 134 : Works of, 

318, 330, 347, 359, 370, 383, 403, 

419, 426, 441 
Morone, Domenico, 25; Works of, 

265 
Morone, Francesco, 25; Works of, 

276, 301, 330, 426 
Moroni, Giov. Batt., 64 ; Works of, 

258, 260, 270, 276, 325, 331, 347. 

355, 426, 441 



Mostaert, Jan, Works of, 307 
Mouclieron, 170; Works of, 811, 

323, 370, 426, 441 
Moya, P. de. Works of, 441 
Mudo, El — see Navarr«te. 
Munich, Koyal Pinacothek, 356 
Murano, Andrea da, 19 

„ Giovanni and Antonio da, 

19; Works of, 298 
Murano, School of, 18 
Murillo, 206 ; Works of, 265, 288, 

291, 307, 331, 347, 359, 364, 880, 

383, 388, 399, 414, 426, 441 
Musscher, M. van, 170; Works of, 

314, 318 
Mytens, A., younger. Works of, 311 
Mytens, D., 137 ; Works of, 323, 419 

N. 

Nain, Le, Works of, 409, 412 
Naples, Museum, 278 
„ School of, 88 
Nason, Works of, 331 
Natoire, Works of, 410 
Naturalists, The term, 75 
„ School of, 88 

Navarrete, 195 ; Works of, 383 
Neefs, Pieter, 129 ; Works of, 270, 

307, 311, 347, 355, 371, 383, 408» 

414, 441 
Neer, A. van der, 168 ; Works of 

307, 311, 314, 331, 335, 841, 859, 

364, 371, 403, 404, 414, 426, 441, 

442 
Neer, Eglon van der. Works of, 270 
Netscher, Constantin, Works o^ 442 
Netscher, Ghispar, 154; Works of^ 

311, 318, 323, 331, 337, 347, 355, 

359, 364, 404, 426, 442 
Niccolo di Pietro, Works of, 263 
Nieulant, Adrian van, Works of, 807 
Niirnberg, Moritz-kapelle, 362 

O. 

Ochtervelt, Jacob, Works of, 442 
Oliver, Isaac, 233 
„ Peter, 233 



462 



INDEX, 



OoBt, Jaoques van, elder, 129 ; Works 

of, 304, 442 
Oost, Jaoques van, yoanger, Works 

of, 304 
Opie, John, 246; Works of, 414, 

431 
Orcagna, 7 ; Works of, 426 
Orlev, BemariJ van, 112 ; Works of, 

30*2, 303, 307, 347, 371, 379, 442 
Os, Jan vau, 170; Works of, 325, 

404, 426 
Okstade, Adrian van, 143; Works 

of, 303, 307, 311, 312, 314, 315, 

816, 318, 321, 337, 341, 348, 359, 

379, 404, 411, 414, 426, 442 
Ostade, Isaac van, 143; Works of, 

307, 311, 323, 359, 411, 426, 442 
Oudry, 227 ; Works of, 409 
Ouwater, A. van, 132 

P. 

Paoohiarotto, Works of, 426 
Paobeco, Francisco, 198, 201 ; Works 

of,' 383, 38S 
Padovanino, Works of, 298, 348, 419, 

426 
Padua, Museo Civico, 281 

„ Sch».l of, 23 
Pagano, Gaspar, Works of, 278 
Palamedes, Works of, 307, 331, 419 
Palma Vecchio, 52, 53 ; Works of, 

258, 265, 270, 277, 278, 280, 287, 

291, 298, 299, 331, 348, 359, 371, 

395, 419, 442 
Palma the younger, Works of, 299, 

300 
Palmezzano, Works of, 395 
Pannini, Works of, 307, 395 
Paolo, Jacopo di, 8 ; Works of, 259 
Papa, Simone, Works of, 280 
Pareja, Juan de, 206; Works of, 383, 

442 
Paris, The Louvre, 392 
Parma, Pinacoteca, 281 
J^mwegianino, H, 74 ; Works of, 259, 
2e^, 279, 280, 282, 348, 384, 426 
JPa^ Peter, 230 ; Works of, 409 



Pater, 226 ; Works of, 348, 409, 412 
Patinir, Joachim de. 111 ; Works of, 

331, 340, 371, 384, 327 
Peeters, Clara, 129 ; Works of, 384 
Peirson, Works of, 331 
Pellepprino da S. Daniele, 65 ; Works 

of 298 427 
Pencz, George, 186 ; Works of, 323, 

331, 371 
Penni, Giov. Franc, 47 ; Works of, 

292, 293 
Peiugin, Pinacoteca, 282 

„ Sala del Cambio, 283 
Perugino, Pietro, 26, 41, 43 ; Works 
of, 259, 263, 265, 271, 282, 283, 
284, 285, 290, 291, 292, 294, 307, 
331, 355, 359, 371, 377, 390, 391, 
395, 396, 427 
Peruzzi, Baldasare, Works of, 265, 

289, 399 
Pesno, Antoine, Works of, 331 
Pietro, Giovanni di, 28 

Sano di, Worka of, 294, 295 
Pinturicchio, 28 ; Works of, 265, 280, 

282, 292, 331, 396, 398, 427 
Piombo, Sebastiano del, 46, 51 ; 
Works of, 258. 266, 267, 271, 279, 
280, 282, 285, 289, 290, 331, 348, 
355, 359, 385, 396, 419, 429, 442 
Pisa, Accademia, 283 
„ Campo Santo, 7 
„ School of — see Tuscan. 
Pisano, Giunta, 2 ; Works of, 427 
Poel, E. van der, 170 ; Works of, 311, 

442 
Poelenburg, 170 ; Works of, 311, 378, 

414, 421, 442 
PoUaj nolo, Antonio, 13; Works of, 

265, 271, 278, 331, 427 
PoUajuolo, Pietro, 14 
Ponte — ^see Baesano. 
Pontormo, Jacopo, 40; Works of, 

265, 271, 396, 427 

Pordenone, Bernardino da, 61 ; 

Works of, 286, 288, 331, 348, 442 

Pordenone, Giov. Antonio, 61 ; 

. Works of, 265, 286, 288, 290, 299, 



INDEX. 



468 



Porta, Baccio della — 6ee Barto- 

lommeo. 
Porte, Roland de la, 230 ; Works 

of, 409, 412 
Portugal, Painting in, 213 
Pottenbiirg, Works of, 348 
Potter, Paul, 165; Works of, 296, 

311, 314, 315, 318, 321, 335, 337, 

341, 348. 399, 404, 427, 442 
Potter, Pieter, Works of, 335 
Pourbus, Frans, elder, 114; Works 

of, 371, 404, 443 
Pourbus, Frans, younger, 114; 

Works of, 265, 307, 371, 404 
Pourbus, Peter, 113 ; Works of, 304 
Poussin, Nicolas, 217 ; Works of, 

292, 331, 348, 378, 384, 391, 409, 

414, 415, 419, 427, 443 
Previtali, Works of, 277, 342, 427 
Primaticcio, Francesco, 47 
Procaccini, Camillo, 86 ; Works of, 

325, 348, 377, 443 
Procaccini, Ercole, 8() 

„ Giulio Cesare,86 ; Works 

of, 348, 378, 396, 443 
Puccio di Simone, Works of, 263 

„ Pietro di, 8 
Pynacker, 168 ; Works of, 307, 318, 

411, 415, 443 

Q. 

Q lattrocentisti. Definition of, 2 

„ Masters of, 9 

Quellinus, Erasmus, 129; Works of, 
308 

R. 

Raeburn, Henry, 246 

Raflfaellino del Garbo, Works of, 
331, 396 

Ramsay, Allan, 238 

Raphael, 35, 41 ; Works of, 258, 259, 
260, 265, 266, 271, 275, 277, 279, 
282, 284, 285, 288, 289, 290, 291, 
292, 293, 296, 331, 337, 348, 359, 
360, 371, 377, 384. 391. 392, 396, 
420, 427, 443 

Raphael, Followers of, 47; Works 
of, 266, 289 



Ravestejm, J. van, 135 ; Works of^ 

307, 321, 332, 335, 34S, 360, 411 
Razzi— see Sodoma. 
Rembrandt, 155 ; Works of, 266, 271, 

281, 303, 307, 311, 314, 315, 316, 

318, 319, 321, 323, 332, 335, 337, 

341, 348, 349, 355, 360, 371, 372, 

378, 379, 384, 399, 404, 411, 415, 

419, 427, 443, 444 
Renaissance, The term, 8 
Reui — see Guido. 
Reynolds, Sir Joshua, 238 ; Works 

of, 392, 415. 431, 432, 444 
Rhenish School, Works of, 340 
Ribalta, Francisco de, 196 ; Works 

of, 384, 389, 444 
Ribalta, Juan de, 197 ; Works of, 389 
Ribtra, Jose' de, 89, 197 ; Works of, 

266, 271, 279, 292, 325, 332, 335, 

337, 349, 355, 360, 380, 384, 389, 

411, 444 
Ricci, Sebastiano, Works of, 396, 

399, 419 
Riccio, Felice, Works of, 396 
Richardson, Jonathan, 236 
Rigaud, Hyacinthe, 223; Works 

of, 349, 372, 409, 412, 415 427, 

444 
Riley, John, 236 ; Works of, 419 
Rincon, Antonio del, 193; Works 

of, 444 
Ring. L. van, Works of, 332 

„ P. de. Works of, 349 
Robusti, Jacopo — see Tintoretto. 
Roelas, Juan de las, 199 ; Works of, 

384, 388, 445 
Roestraten, Works of, 420 
Romanino, II, 64; Works* of, 260, 

277, 281, 332, 427 
Romano, Giulio, 44, 46 ; Works of, 

271, 274, 279, 284, 292, 293, 349, 

372, 396, 427, 428, 446 
Rombouts, Theodore, Works of, 815, 

445 
Rome — 

Accademia di Ban Luca, 283 
Barberini Palace, 284 
Borghese Palace, 284 
Golonna Falace^ 287 



464 



INDEX, 



Borne— continued. 

CorsiDi Palace, 287 
Doria Palace, 288 
Famese Palace, 289 
Gallery of Capitol, 286 
Quirinal Palace, 289 
Bospigliosi Palace, 290 
Boiarra Palace, 290 
Spada Palace, 291 
Vatican Collection, 291 
Villa Albani, 284 
Villa Farnesina, 289 
Villa LudovisT, 289 
Borne, School of, 41, 86 
Bomevn, Willem, Works of, 813 
Bomney, George, 243 ; Works of, 432 
Boos, 189 ; Works of, 445 
Bosa di Tivoli— «ee Boos. 
Bosa, Salvator, 90 : Works of, 266, 
271, 287, 332, 349, 372, 392, 396, 
415, 428, 445 
Bosselli, Cosimo, 16, 36 ; Works of, 

294, 332, 397, 428 
Bottenhammer, 188 ; Works of, 327, 

379, 404, 428, 445 
Botterdam, Museum, 322 
Bubens, 116 ; Works of, 266, 271, 
273, 277, 287, 303, 307, 314, 320, 
321, 324, 332, 333, 335, 337, 339, 
841, 349, 350, 355, 360, 364, 372, 
373, 377, 384, 385, 390, 391, 404, 
405, 411, 415, 428, 445, 446 
Bussia, Gallery of, 433 
Buysch, Rachel, 140 ; Works of, 266, 
271, 311, 319, 323, 332, 355, 360, 
361, 373, 379 
Buysdael, Jacob, 166; Works of, 
266, 307, 311, 313, 314, 315, 319, 
823, 332, 335, 337, 350, 355, 361, 
373, 379, 405, 415, 428, 446 
Buysdael, Solomon, Works of, 313 
Byckaert, 170 ; Works of, 308, 350, 
873, 379, 385, 399 



S. 

SabbatinU Andrea, Works of, 280 
Saoohl, Andrea, 81, 217; Works of, 
-2*^4 332, 897 



\ 



Sallaert, Works of, 308, 332 

Salvi — see Sassoferrato. 

Sandby, Paul, 251 

Sandrart, J. von, 189 

Santerre, 230; Works of, 409 

Santi, Giovanni, Works of; 297, 332 

Santvort, Works of, 341 

Sanzio — see Eaphael. 

Sarto, Andrea del, 38 ; Works of, 

263, 266. 271. 273, 279, 285, 350, 

361, 373, 385, 397, 415, 428, 446 
Sa.ssoterrato, 85; Works of, 271, 

285, 286, 292, 332, 337, 355. 373, 

397, 428, 446 
Savery, Jacob, Works of, 319 
„ R., Works of, 373, 428 
Savoldo, Girolamo, Works of, 267, 

272, 277, 296, 299, 332 
Saxony, School of, 186 
Scarseilino, Lo, Works of, 261, 266, 

278 
Schalken, G., 154 ; Works of, 272, 

308, 311, 319, 325, 341, 350, 355, 

373, 405, 428, 446 
Schedone, Bartolommeo, 83 ; Works 

of, 446 
Schiavone, Andrea, 61; Works of, 

373, 446 
Schiavone, G., Works of, 428 
Schidone, Works of, 278, 279 
Schoen — see Schonganer. 
Schongauer, Martin, 177 ; Works of, 

294, 308, 340, 341, 361, 363, 373, 

428 
Schoorl, Jan, 134; Works of, 378, 

428, 429, 446 
Sepfhers, Daniel, 129; Works of, 

303, 308 
Semitecolo, Nicoleis, Works of, 

299 
Sesto, Cesare, Works of, 275, 277, 

278, 291, 296, 353 
Seville, Provincial Museum, 388 

„ School of, 196, 198 
Siberechts, Jan, Works of, 308 
Siena — 

Gallery, 294 
YBlaaift^TxfeVXko, 295 



Sipna, School of((«e Tnscan), iS; 

Works of, 398 
SignoreUi, 15 ; Works of, 272, 277, 

2il4, 295, 332, 350, 371, 3S8, 429 , 
Sirani, Elisabetta, 86; Worka of, 

2S9, 2'JO, 3T4, 373, 446 
BUuc^Uml, P. vim, 154 ; Worka of, 

272, 311, 350, 355, 40S, 415 
SmejerB, Woik^j of, 308 
Smith, George, 251 
Snayers, Works of; 308, 374 
SnydeiB, Frana, 123 : Worka of, 

303, 308, 311, 320, 333. 330, 337, 

850, 355, 361, 374, 385, 3jl, 405, 

411, 446, 4*7 
Sodoma, 11, 40: Works of, 271, 

289, 294, 295, 296, 361, 374 
Solano, Andrea, 35 ; Works of, 277, 

aeo, 285, 333, 397, 399, 429 
Somer, Paul van. Works of, 419 
Speda, Lionello, S4; Worka of, 278, 



uLo, 1 



; Works of 



I Aretiuo, Wotka of, ' 



Bteei),Ja[i,145; Works of, 272, 
308, 311, 313, 314, 315, 316, 
321, 323, 333, 336, 337, 350, 355, 
361, 373, 392, 405, 411. 429, 447 

Steenwyk, H, van, 170; Worka of, 
308 

StofoDo, Tommaeo di, 6; Worka of, 
277 

Stone, Henrr, 234 ; Works of, 420 

Stoop, D., 170 ; Works of, 308 

Strozzi, B., Worka of; 350, 447 

BLubbs, Gearue, 250 

Stuttgart, (iallerr. 363 

Subleyraa, 230; Works of, 351, 409 



Suenr, Eustache le,221; Worksop 

409, 410 
Sunder — lee CraoBoh. 
jstennann, 113; Works of, 306, 

330, 440 
Sustermanns, Jnatiu, 129; Worka of, 

267, 373 
Swabian School, 177 
Swonevelt, 170 

, T. 

Tedesco— ae« Elzheimer. 
Teaiera, David, elder, 143 ; Worka 

of, 272, 351, 415, 429. 447 
Tenicra, David, yoanger, 144 

Works of, 296, 308, 311, 314, 

315, 320, 321. 333. 336, 337, 351, 

355, 361. 374. 379, 385, 391, 392, 

405,411.415,429,447 
Terburg, 6., 147; Works of, 272, 

303,311,312, 313, 314,315,316, 

319, 333, 336, 337, 338, 351, 355, 

361, 374, 378, 391, 392, 405, 411, 

429, 447 
Theotocopuli. D.—>ee Greco, IL 
Thomhill, Sir James, 236 ; Wnrka 

of, 4-20 
Thulden, Theodore van, 129 
Tiariui, Alteaandro, 84 ; Works o^ 

259, 351, 361, 397 
Tiepolo, 94 ; Works of, 333, 355, 899, 

415, 447 
Till.org, Wolks of, 308 
Tintoretto, 66; Worka of, 267, 272, 

278, 299, 300, 308, 325, 333, 351, 

374, 385, 397, 410, 429, 447, 448 
Titian, 35, 53, 66 ; Worka of, 267, 



272, -J 



, 277,2 



291, 202. 299, S 
339, Ml, 351, 355, 361, 364, 374; 
375, a85. 380, 397, 420, 429, 448 
Tobar, Ut; 211 ; Works of, 386 

" Louis. 230 : Works of, 410 



lole-io," 



)l of, 1 



rka of, 282 
Ti«vi80, Girolamo da. Works 0^428 
Tiioson, 230 
Triatsn, Luia, Works of, 448 



466 



INDEX. 



Troost, Gomelis, Works of, 319 
Troy, De, 230 ; Works of, 410 
Tura, Cosimo, 24 ; Works o^ 261, 

833, 398, 429 
Turchi, Works of, 351 
Turin, Pinaooteoa, 296 
Tuscan School, Definition of, 2 
„ Masters of^ 2, 4 



M 



u. 

Uocello, Paolo, 10 ; Works of, 272, 

398 429 
UchteWeld, 170; Works of, 819 
Udine, Martino da — see Pellegrino. 
Ugolino da Biena, Works of, 268 
Umbrian School, 16, 17 

„ „ Characteristics, 26 

Urbino, Museum, 297 
Utrecht, A. van, 448 

V. 

Vaooaio, Andrea, Works of, 448 
Valencia, Museum, 389 

„ School of, 194, 197 
Valentin, Mo'ise, 220; Works of, 

292, 386, 410, 448 
Valkenbbrck, Martin van. Works 

of, 333 
Valkeuburg, L. de, Works of, 375, 

386. 
Vanni, Works of, 397 
Vannucchi — see Sarto. 
Vannucci — see Perugino. 
Vargas, Luis de, 196 
Vasari, Giorgio, 40 ; Works of, 259, 

397 
Vasco, Gran, 213 
Vasquez, Alonso, Works of, 388 
Vecellio, Tiziano — see Titian. 
Veen, Otho van, 118 ; Works of, 361, 

405 
Vega, De la, 211 
Velasquez, Don Diego, 201, 206; 

Works of, 258, 267, 272, 287, 289, 
^96, 320, 333, 336, 351, 355, 361, 
373, 376, 386, 387, 399, 411, 416, 
420, 429, 448 



Velde, A. van de, 162, 164, 167; 
Works of, 310, 311, 312, 313, 314, 
315, 316, 319, 321, 333, 336, 338, 
3.n, 352, 405, 406, 415, 429, 430, 
448 

Velde, Willem van de, 169 ; Works 
of, 312, 314, 319, 338,352, 406, 
415, 416, 420, 430 
Venice — 

Academy, 297 
Ducal Palace, 299 
Scuoia di Sau Bocco, 300 
Venice, School of, 18, 50, 92 
Veune, A. van der, 170 ; Works of, 

406 
Verdier, Works of, 410 
Verdussen, Works of, 420 
Veiiolie, J., Works of, 406 
Vernet, Claude Joseph, 229 ; Works 
of, 272, 320, 352, 361, 376, 387, 
410, 416, 430 
Verona, Pinacoteca, 300 

„ School of, 25 

Veronese, Paolo, 68, 1 18 ; Works of, 

267, 272, 273, 277, 296, 299, 300, 

308, 333, 338, 352, 355, 361, 376, 

387, 391, 397, 398, 430, 448, 449 

Verrocchio, Andrea, 13 ; Works of, 

263, 333, 449 
Vertipronck, Jan, Works of, 317, 

333 
Vicentino, Andrea, Works of, 299, 

300 
Vicentino, Girolamo, Works of, 258 
Victor, Works of, 332, 333 
Vien, Joseph MArie, 229; Works 

0^ 410 
Vienna — 

The Belvedere, 864 
The Liechtenstein, 876 
Vinci, L. da, 30 ; Works of, 263, 267, 
272, 275, 277, 291, 292, 325, 352, 
398, 430, 449 
Vitale da Bologna, 8 ; Works o^ 259 
Viti, Timoteo, Works of, 259, 261, 

277, 284, 297, 333 
Vivarini, Antonio, 19; Works of, 
^^^,^';^,*2a^,383,430 



INDEX. 



467 



Vivarini, Bartolorameo, 19 ; Works 

of, 258, 259, 280, 299, 333, 376, 

430 
"Vivarini, Giovanni, 19; Works of, 

279, 299 
Vivarini, Luigi, 19 ; Works of, 279, 

299, 333 
Vlieger, S. de, 170 
Viiet, H. van, 170 ; Works of, 319 
Vois, A. de, 170; Works of, 312, 

406 
Volterra, Daniele da, 38 ; Works of, 

272, 398 
Volterra, Fi-flncesco da, 8 
Vos, Cornelia de, 116 ; Works of, 303, 

308, 333, 363 
Vos, Martin d^, 115 ; Works of, 272, 

303, 308, 334 
Vos, Simon de. Works of, 334 
Vouet, Simon, 217 ; Works of, 410 
Vroom, H. C, 170 ; Works of, 317 

W. 

Walker, Eobert, 235 ; Works of, 420, 

449 
Waterloo, A., 170 ; Works of, 361 
Wattean, Antoine, 224 ; Works of, 

272, 334, 336, 352, 362, 376, 387, 

410, 412, 416, 449 
Weenix, Jan, 141 : Works of, 303, 

308, 312, 314, 319, 323, 334, 352, 

355, 362, 379, 406, 430, 449 
Werff, Van der, 155 ; Works of, 272, 

296, 312, 319, 334, 352, 362, 406, 

416, 449 
West, Benjamin, 248 ; Works of, 

432 



Wevden, Rogier van der, elder, 106, 

177 ; Works of, 272, 303, 308, 320, 

334, 352, 355, 362, 376, 387, 399, 

430 
Wevden, Rogier van der, younger, 

1*08 ; Works of, 355, 430 
Willaertz, Adam, Works of, 334 
Wilson, R., 244 ; Works of, 416, 432 
Witte, E. de, 170 ; Works of, 308, 

323 334 
Wohlgemuth, 177, 183; Works of; 

325, 341, 362, 363 
Wouwerman, Jan, 163 

„ Philip. 162: Works 

of, 296, 312. 313, 314, 315, 316, 

319, 321, 338, 352, 362, 376, 392, 

406, 411, 416, 430, 449 
Wouwerman, Pieter, 163 
Wright, Joseph, 245 ; Works of, 420, 

432 
Wright, Michael, 251 
Wynant8, Jan, 141 ; Works of, 308, 

312, 313, 314, 321, 355, 362, 376, 

392, 406, 416, 430, 450 

Z. 

Zeitblom, 177 ; Works of, 325, 334, 

341, 363 
Zereso, Mateo, Works of,' 320 
Zoffany, 251 

Zoppo, Marco, 29 ; Works of, 430 
Zorg. Works of, 323, 406 
Zuccarelli, 251 ; Works of, 416 
Zucc'hero, Works of, 420 
Zuibaran, 200; Works of, 325, 334, 

352, 362, 380, 387, 388, 399, 430, 

450 



lovdon: 
fbtnteo by william clowes and sons, 

flTAMVOUI) STRRi?r ATZD CHAHrNG CBOSS.